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Trump announces new sanctions on North Korea through executive order

Posted by on Sep. 21, 2017 at 12:47 PM
  • 26 Replies

Trump announces new sanctions on North Korea through executive order


Trump announces new sanctions on North Korea through executive order


President Trump on Thursday announced he would sign an executive order imposing new sanctions on North Korea, as the U.S. and its allies sought to ramp up pressure on Kim Jong Un to abandon his nuclear ambitions.

“I am announcing a new executive order to sign that significantly expands authorities to target individuals, companies, financial institutions that finance and facilitate trade with North Korea,” Trump said.

The president made the announcement just before a United Nations summit with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korean President Moon Jae-in, two key allies in the region.

The U.N. recently passed two resolutions recently aimed at squeezing the North Korean economy by cutting off oil, labor and exports to the nation.

“We have strangled their economic situation at this point,” U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley told reporters on Friday. “That’s going to take a little bit of time, but it has already started to take effect.”

Trump had thanked the U.N. Security Council for voting unanimously to impose the latest sanctions but indicated last week he found them insufficient.

“It’s just another very small step. Not a big deal … I don’t know if it has any impact, but certainly it was nice to get a 15-0 vote,” Trump said at the White House.

In his maiden address to the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday, Trump took a hard line on Kim’s nuclear ambitions, threatening to “totally destroy” the nation if it continued its provocations. 

Updated 12:40 p.m.


http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/351746-trump-announces-new-sanctions-on-north-korea-through-executive-order


by on Sep. 21, 2017 at 12:47 PM
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Replies (1-10):
VooDooB
by Emerald Member on Sep. 21, 2017 at 2:04 PM

Big news?

No?

billsfan1104
by on Sep. 21, 2017 at 2:16 PM

i wonder how this iwll help

Billiejeens
by The Librarian on Sep. 21, 2017 at 2:17 PM

Trump had thanked the U.N. Security Council for voting unanimously to impose the latest sanctions but indicated last week he found them insufficient.

“It’s just another very small step. Not a big deal … I don’t know if it has any impact, but certainly it was nice to get a 15-0 vote,” Trump said at the White House.



3 Dimensional chess - baby

meriana
by Ruby Member on Sep. 21, 2017 at 2:22 PM
1 mom liked this

He really does want to push Kim Jong-Un into doing something completely stupid doesn't he. 

VooDooB
by Emerald Member on Sep. 21, 2017 at 2:23 PM
Well , in my opinion - I think NK will respond by firing another missile in the next 48 hours.

It won't help. But it's gotten to the point that small measures (such as more sanctions) have to be taken until we are out of options.

NK has been ramping up threats and wanting to fight with America since the war about 70 years ago.
This issue should have been addressed a long time ago. But every president has brushed it aside. Now NK has a leader who refuses to be ignored and America has a leader who is easily provoked. It's a recipe for disaster.


Quoting billsfan1104:

i wonder how this iwll help

joyfree
by Platinum Member on Sep. 21, 2017 at 2:23 PM
😂😂🤣😂🤣😂🤣😂

No.

Quoting Billiejeens:

Trump had thanked the U.N. Security Council for voting unanimously to impose the latest sanctions but indicated last week he found them insufficient.

“It’s just another very small step. Not a big deal … I don’t know if it has any impact, but certainly it was nice to get a 15-0 vote,” Trump said at the White House.

3 Dimensional chess - baby

joyfree
by Platinum Member on Sep. 21, 2017 at 2:25 PM
1 mom liked this
He so wants to push the missile button.

Asshole.

Quoting meriana:

He really does want to push Kim Jong-Un into doing something completely stupid doesn't he. 

VooDooB
by Emerald Member on Sep. 21, 2017 at 2:25 PM

This has been ramping up since the 50's. It's completely ignorant to place the blame on Trump for Kim's actions.

Quoting meriana:

He really does want to push Kim Jong-Un into doing something completely stupid doesn't he. 


billsfan1104
by on Sep. 21, 2017 at 2:31 PM
1 mom liked this
I agree with you. Each of these presidents kicked the van down the road and now Trump has to deal with it.
Funny how all of a sudden, every one else has the answers, but didn't do shit for the last 30 years


Quoting VooDooB: Well , in my opinion - I think NK will respond by firing another missile in the next 48 hours.

It won't help. But it's gotten to the point that small measures (such as more sanctions) have to be taken until we are out of options.

NK has been ramping up threats and wanting to fight with America since the war about 70 years ago.
This issue should have been addressed a long time ago. But every president has brushed it aside. Now NK has a leader who refuses to be ignored and America has a leader who is easily provoked. It's a recipe for disaster.


Quoting billsfan1104:

i wonder how this iwll help

VooDooB
by Emerald Member on Sep. 21, 2017 at 2:36 PM

A Timeline of North Korea’s Missile Launches and Nuclear Detonations


The North Korean weapons program now testing U.S. President Donald Trump stretches back decades, when the regime began reverse-engineering Scud missiles acquired from Egypt. International efforts to curb North Korea’s nuclear threat were dealt a setback in 2006 with the country’s first successful bomb test, and former leader Kim Jong Il abandoned talks a few years later. His son and successor, Kim Jong Un, has only accelerated the program, testing more sophisticated technology in defiance of international sanctions.

Here’s a detailed history of North Korea’s weapons programs:

1976-81: North Korea begins missile development using Scud-B from the Soviet Union and launchpad from Egypt

1984: First Scud-B missile test firing

1988: Operational deployment of Scud-B and Scud-C missiles

1990: First Rodong missile test firing

July 1994: North Korea’s founding leader Kim Il Sung dies, allowing son and heir Kim Jong Il to assume full leadership

1998: Operational deployment of Rodong missiles, which have a range of 1,300 kilometers (800 miles). Firing of Taepodong-1 missile, which North Korea says was satellite launch

January 2002: U.S. President George W. Bush cites weapons programs in placing North Korea alongside Iran and Iraq in an “axis of evil” 

2003: North Korea withdraws from the Non-Proliferation Treaty, beginsacquiring weapons-grade plutonium from spent fuel rods. First so-called six-party talks held to resolve concerns over the country’s activities, including China, Japan, Russia, South Korea and the U.S.

2005: North Korea announces possession of nuclear weapons and its withdrawal from six-party talks aimed at ending its atomic program

July 2006: Test firings of Taepodong-2, Rodong and Scud missiles. The Taepodong-2 is a long-range missile that capable of traveling 15,000 kilometers and striking U.S. targets. Even so, analysts say it’s mostly used to launch satellites and would be difficult to convert into a rocket that can deliver weapons

October 2006: The official Korean Central News Agency announces a “successful nuclear test”

2007: Operational deployment of Rodong missiles

April 2009: Firing of Taepodong-2 missile, which North Korea says was satellite launch. United Nations strengthens sanctions and North Korea withdraws from six-party talks

May 2009: North Korea carries out second nuclear test

July 2009: Test-firing of Scud and Rodong missiles

December 2011: North Korean leader Kim Jong Il dies, clearing way for Kim Jong Un to take power

April 2012: North Korea reports failed Unha-3 rocket launch

December 2012: North Korea launches Unha-3 rocket that puts its first satellite into space

February 2013: North Korea conducts third underground nuclear test

August 2013: North Korea reported to have restarted nuclear reactor to produce plutonium

May 2015: North Korea claims to have tested a submarine-launched missile; says it developed technology to mount nuclear warhead on a missile

July 2014: North Korea conducts series of missile tests ahead of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit to Seoul

September 2015: North Korea threatens nuclear attack against U.S. and reaffirms its main reactor is operational. South Korean President Park Geun-hye says North will “pay a price” for fourth test

December 2015: Kim Jong Un says North Korea is “ready to detonate” a hydrogen bomb

Jan. 6, 2016: North Korea says it successfully tests hydrogen bomb

Feb. 7, 2016: North Korea launches a long-range rocket that it says successfully put a satellite into orbit

Aug. 24, 2016: North Korea successfully launches a ballistic missile from a submarine

Sept. 5, 2016: North Korea fires three ballistic missiles about 1,000 kilometers, at least one of which entered Japan’s air defense zone

Sept. 9, 2016: North Korea conducts fifth nuclear test

Oct. 16, 2016: North Korea fires a ballistic missile that immediately explodes after launch

Feb. 12, 2017: North Korea fires an intermediate-range Pukguksong-2 ballistic missile into nearby seas, drawing a joint rebuke from Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who were meeting in Florida

March 6, 2017: North Korea fires four ballistic missiles, with three falling into Japan’s exclusive economic zone

April 16, 2017: North Korea fired an unidentified ballistic missile that exploded almost immediately after launch, defying warnings from the Trump administration to avoid any further provocations





This article was dated in April, 2017.  https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-04-16/north-korea-missile-launches-nuclear-detonations-timeline

Continuing 2017:  source 7 days ago  http://abcnews.go.com/International/north-korean-missile-test-year/story?id=46592733





April 4

On April 4, a KN-17 missile launch came just days before Chinese President Xi Jinping met with Trump at Mar-a-Lago, during which the pair discussed how to curb North Korea's missile and nuclear programs.

The Trump administration is hoping China will exert its economic influence over North Korea since the country controls eighty percent of all foreign trade with the reclusive regime.

U.S. officials said the missile spun out of control and landed in the Sea of Japan after traveling 34 miles. It was being assessed as an in-flight failure.

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson released a terse statement following Tuesday's test, saying, "North Korea launched yet another intermediate range ballistic missile. The United States has spoken enough about North Korea. We have no further comment."

The KN-17 is a new mobile-launched, single-stage missile that uses liquid fuel. It has not been successfully tested by North Korea, so it's difficult to assess its full range.

April 15

Less than two weeks later, North Korea launched another KN-17 that exploded shortly after launch.

"The launch failed very early on, so that makes it harder to know exactly what they were trying to do," Susan Thornton, acting assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, said days later. "But I think that our understanding is that it was not one of the longer-range missiles that they were trying to test there; it was something like a medium-range ballistic missile."

Vice President Mike Pence was briefed on the failed missile launch en route to South Korea on Air Force 2.

While speaking with U.S. members of the military in Seoul, Pence described it as a "provocation."

"This morning's provocation from the North is just the latest reminder of the risks each one of you face every day in the defense of the freedom of the people of South Korea and the defense of America in this part of the world," Pence said. "Your willingness to step forward, to serve, to stand firm without fear inspires our nation and inspires the world, and it's an honor for us to share this meal with you today."

April 28

North Korea fired a KN-17 for at least the third launch in April; this time the missile traveled 21 miles before breaking up in mid-air, according to a U.S. official.

A U.S. Pacific Command spokesman noted that it was "aware of the event" but gave no further comment in the immediate aftermath of the launch.

May 14

The U.S. believes the ballistic missile North Korea launched was a KN-17 medium range missile, not a new intermediate range missile. The launch was the first successful test of this type after several previous failures.

Launched from Kusong, in western North Korea, the missile flew for 435 miles before landing in the Sea of Japan, 60 miles from the Russian border. The Japanese Defense Minister Tomomi Inada told reporters that the missile reached an unprecedented altitude of 2,000 kilometers (1,245 miles), which raised speculation that North Korea may have developed a new intermediate range missile. Experts claim the missile would have flown a much greater distance if launched on a maximum trajectory, perhaps reaching military bases in Guam.

North Korea boasted the "medium long-range" ballistic rocket is capable of carrying a heavy nuclear warhead, but most experts view that claim with skepticism believing the North Koreans have yet to perfect the necessary technology.

The missile was first seen publicly in a military parade in Pyongyang on April 15.

May 21

On May 21, the White House confirmed that North Korea successfully launched a medium-range ballistic missile with a shorter range than missiles in previous tests. The South Korean military said the missile traveled over 500 kilometers (just over 300 miles) into the Sea of Japan.

A U.S. official told ABC News that it was a KN-15, the same solid-fueled missile tested on February 11 that can be fired at short notice.

North Korea said shortly after the test that they were ready to mass produce medium-range ballistic missiles capable of reaching Japan and US military bases there.

This test occurred as Trump was in Saudi Arabia, the first stop on his first foreign trip as president.

May 28

On May 28 at 10:40 p.m. Hawaii time, North Korea conducted its ninth test, a short-range ballistic missile launched from near Wonsan Airfield.

The missile was tracked for six minutes by U.S. Pacific Command before it landed in the Sea of Japan.

A U.S. defense official told ABC News it appeared to be a SCUD-type missile.

North Korea said this latest launch was aimed at testing a new precision-guidance system.

July 4

North Korea launched, for the first time, a two-stage intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) to mark the U.S. holiday of July 4.

The missile was launched into a high-altitude trajectory of 1,730 miles and flew horizontally about 577 miles into the Sea of Japan.

The missile emerged from the north of Kusong, a city located in the far northwestern corner of North Korea, an area used for launches in the past.

"The United States strongly condemns North Korea's launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile," Tillerson said in a statement. "Testing an ICBM represents a new escalation of the threat to the United States, our allies and partners, the region, and the world."

July 28

Three weeks after its first ICBM launch, North Korea tested a second ICBM from Mupyong-ni, in the far north of the country, near an arms plant.

It traveled 621 miles laterally for 45 minutes and landed in the Sea of Japan, inside Japan’s Economic Exclusion Zone, about 88 nautical miles west of Hokkaido.

It marked the longest flight of a ballistic missile in North Korea's history, according to the Pentagon.

According to the South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff, the ICBM traveled 2,300 miles into space. Experts fear that if North Korea angled the trajectory of that missile, it could potentially travel as far as Washington, D.C., or New York.

In a statement, Trump condemned the launch, saying that North Korea's "second such test in less than a month" is the "latest reckless and dangerous action" by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's regime.

U.S. officials had suspected a test could occur on July 27 to mark the North Korean holiday known as "Day of Victory," which celebrates the end of hostilities in the Korean War in 1953. But rainy weather at the launch location and technical difficulties appeared to have prevented a launch then.

Aug. 25

PACOM confirmed that North Korea fired three short-range ballistic missiles into the Sea of Japan with the first and third failing in flight. The second "appears to have blown up almost immediately," PACOM said.

The launches came after escalating rhetoric between Trump and Kim.

On Aug. 8, Trump threatened North Korea with "fire and fury like the world has never seen," touching off a war of words between the two governments.

Kim said he would consider sending missiles into the waters off the coast of Guam in "mid-August." Guam is a U.S. island territory that is home to two American military bases.

But, after reviewing those plans, Kim ultimately decided he would “watch a little more the foolish and stupid conduct of the Yankees," seeming to walk back an imminent threat to the island and de-escalating tensions on the Peninsula -- at least for now.

Aug. 28

The Pentagon and Japanese government each confirmed a North Korean missile traveled over Japan and landed in the ocean.

A U.S. official later said that the missile fired was a KN-17 intermediate-range missile that flew 1,667 miles horizontally and broke apart at the end of its flight.

The flight path of a missile spurred a notification to Japanese citizens from the country's emergency alert system.

In response, Trump issued a statement that "all options are on the table" and continued to criticize North Korea for its "threatening and destabilizing actions.

Sept. 14

North Korea launched a missile over Japanese airspace, U.S. officials confirmed.

The missile passed over Japanese airspace near Hokkaido, the same prefecture under which a KN-17 intermediate-range missile traveled on August 28.

Japanese broadcaster NHK reported that the missile traveled up 478 miles high, and traveled for about 2,300 miles.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called on “all nations” to take measures against North Korea, specifically named China and Russia.

“China and Russia must indicate their intolerance for these reckless missile launches by taking direct actions of their own,” Tillerson said in a statement.

This is the 14th missile test conducted by North Korea in 2017.








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