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Liberal California Now Poorest in Nation

Posted by on Nov. 21, 2017 at 11:18 AM
  • 136 Replies
2 moms liked this

The evidence is clear that if you want to live in a well-run state, you’re better off moving to a red one

A study by the non-profit group Truth in Accounting looked at the public financing and debt burdens of all fifty states, which have a total of $1.5 trillion in long-term debt. In blue states, there is an average of $22,214 in unfunded debt. In red states, that taxpayer burden is only $1,473.

Every day, roughly 1,000 people move from blue states to red states on net balance. That’s good news for red states. In 2013, Florida gained $8.2 billion in adjusted gross income from out-of-staters. Texas gained $5.9 billion in one year. And given the more business-friendly environment in red states, they tend to outperform their liberal counterparts in both population and job growth.

If you want a more extreme example, look no further than the most liberal state in the nation: California.

According to Politifact, which was rating the truthfulness of a statement from California Republican Chad Mayes that “California has ‘the highest poverty rate in the nation’ when considering the U.S. Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure (adjusting for the cost of living),” California truly is now the poorest state in the nation.

From the report: “From 2013 to 2015, California had America’s 17th-highest poverty rate, 15 percent, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Official Poverty Measure. That measure uses income levels to determine poverty, but does not consider differences in cost-of-living among states. It lists the official poverty threshold for a two-adult, two-child family at $24,036 in 2015.
During the same period, California had the highest poverty rate, 20.6 percent, according to the census’ Supplemental Poverty Measure. That study does account for cost-of-living, including taxes, housing and medical costs, and is considered by researchers a more accurate reflection of poverty. For a two-adult, two-child family in California, the poverty threshold was an average of $30,000, depending on the region in the state, according to a 2014 analysis by Public Policy Institute of California. Looking at state poverty rates, the second highest is Florida’s 19 percent, followed by New York’s and Louisiana’s shared 17.9 percent rate. The national average is 15.1 percent using the supplemental measure.”

The #1 recipient of migrants from California is Texas, which shows that residents are fleeing the most liberal state to one of the least. In practically every economic measure, Texas does the opposite of California, and it’s worked out extremely well for them.

by on Nov. 21, 2017 at 11:18 AM
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Reading.Rainbow
by Sif on Nov. 21, 2017 at 11:25 AM
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 HowMuch.net found that the states with the largest economies are California (13.3 percent), Texas (9.5 percent), and New York (8.1 percent). The states with the smallest economies are Vermont (0.2 percent), Maine, Rhode Island, North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and Alaska, all of which represent about 0.3 percent of the U.S. economy.

Sisteract
by Whoopie on Nov. 21, 2017 at 11:26 AM
2 moms liked this


Quoting Reading.Rainbow:

 HowMuch.net found that the states with the largest economies are California (13.3 percent), Texas (9.5 percent), and New York (8.1 percent). The states with the smallest economies are Vermont (0.2 percent), Maine, Rhode Island, North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and Alaska, all of which represent about 0.3 percent of the U.S. economy.

CA- is on par with many, many countries.

I'll stay- most can't afford to be here though-

Reading.Rainbow
by Sif on Nov. 21, 2017 at 11:27 AM

We have one of the highest economies, highest living wages, and what is considered poverty here would be bringing in a gold mine in Alabama...


Reading.Rainbow
by Sif on Nov. 21, 2017 at 11:29 AM
1 mom liked this

We're #6 on the list :)

...

Quoting Sisteract:

Quoting Reading.Rainbow:

 HowMuch.net found that the states with the largest economies are California (13.3 percent), Texas (9.5 percent), and New York (8.1 percent). The states with the smallest economies are Vermont (0.2 percent), Maine, Rhode Island, North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and Alaska, all of which represent about 0.3 percent of the U.S. economy.

CA- is on par with many, many countries.

I'll stay- most can't afford to be here though-


Billiejeens
by Emerald Member on Nov. 21, 2017 at 11:31 AM
1 mom liked this

Study: Red States Run 10 Times Better Than Blue States

Whether it’s in the House of Representatives, the Senate, or the White House, Republicans and Democrats alike don’t appear to have much trouble spending like drunken sailors. However, that isn’t the case on the state level, as one new study reveals.


A study by the non-profit group Truth in Accounting looked at the public financing and debt burdens of all fifty states, which have a total of $1.5 trillion in long-term debt. Most of the debt is attributable to unfunded employee pensions and retiree health benefits. The overall conclusion of the study was that red states manage their finances a heck of a lot better than blue states. In this case, I’ll be using the terms “red states” and “blue states” to mean “states where Republicans/Democrats have control of the governorship and both legislative houses.”



As The Federalist Papers summarize:

  • In Blue States, there is an average of $22,214 in unfunded debt. In Red States, that taxpayer burden is only $1,473.
  • In States where power is split, the average is $14,963
  • The five best states, along with their “surplus” per taxpayer are: Alaska, +$38,200, North Dakota, +$24,000, Wyoming, +$20,500, Utah, +$4,600, Nebraska, +$2,600.
  • The five worst states, along with their debt per taxpayer are: New Jersey, -$67,200, Illinois, -$50,400, Connecticut, -$49,500 Kentucky, -$39,000 Massachusetts, -$32,900.

Those are striking differences – with the surplus in debt that blue states have over their red counterparts being tenfold.


Here’s the good news: Years of disastrous liberal policies are turning state and local governments red. From 2008-2015, Democrats lost 35.7% of their governors and 20.3% of their seats in state legislatures.


As a result, people are voting red with their feet too. Every day roughly 1,000 people movefrom blue states to red states on net balance. That’s good news for red states. In 2013, Florida gained $8.2 billion in adjusted gross income from out-of-staters. Texas gained $5.9 billion in one year. And given the more business-friendly environment in red states, they tend to outperform their liberal counterparts in both population and job growth.

ADVERTISING






https://thepoliticalinsider.com/study-red-state-blue-state/?source=TPIpost

Billiejeens
by Emerald Member on Nov. 21, 2017 at 11:33 AM
3 moms liked this

Do you know what debt is?

Quoting Reading.Rainbow:

We're #6 on the list :)

...

Quoting Sisteract:

Quoting Reading.Rainbow:

 HowMuch.net found that the states with the largest economies are California (13.3 percent), Texas (9.5 percent), and New York (8.1 percent). The states with the smallest economies are Vermont (0.2 percent), Maine, Rhode Island, North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and Alaska, all of which represent about 0.3 percent of the U.S. economy.

CA- is on par with many, many countries.

I'll stay- most can't afford to be here though-



Sisteract
by Whoopie on Nov. 21, 2017 at 11:33 AM
1 mom liked this

Keep on moving the goal posts.

Quoting Billiejeens:



Study: Red States Run 10 Times Better Than Blue States

Whether it’s in the House of Representatives, the Senate, or the White House, Republicans and Democrats alike don’t appear to have much trouble spending like drunken sailors. However, that isn’t the case on the state level, as one new study reveals.


A study by the non-profit group Truth in Accounting looked at the public financing and debt burdens of all fifty states, which have a total of $1.5 trillion in long-term debt. Most of the debt is attributable to unfunded employee pensions and retiree health benefits. The overall conclusion of the study was that red states manage their finances a heck of a lot better than blue states. In this case, I’ll be using the terms “red states” and “blue states” to mean “states where Republicans/Democrats have control of the governorship and both legislative houses.”


As The Federalist Papers summarize:

  • In Blue States, there is an average of $22,214 in unfunded debt. In Red States, that taxpayer burden is only $1,473.
  • In States where power is split, the average is $14,963
  • The five best states, along with their “surplus” per taxpayer are: Alaska, +$38,200, North Dakota, +$24,000, Wyoming, +$20,500, Utah, +$4,600, Nebraska, +$2,600.
  • The five worst states, along with their debt per taxpayer are: New Jersey, -$67,200, Illinois, -$50,400, Connecticut, -$49,500 Kentucky, -$39,000 Massachusetts, -$32,900.

Those are striking differences – with the surplus in debt that blue states have over their red counterparts being tenfold.


Here’s the good news: Years of disastrous liberal policies are turning state and local governments red. From 2008-2015, Democrats lost 35.7% of their governors and 20.3% of their seats in state legislatures.


As a result, people are voting red with their feet too. Every day roughly 1,000 people movefrom blue states to red states on net balance. That’s good news for red states. In 2013, Florida gained $8.2 billion in adjusted gross income from out-of-staters. Texas gained $5.9 billion in one year. And given the more business-friendly environment in red states, they tend to outperform their liberal counterparts in both population and job growth.

ADVERTISING






https://thepoliticalinsider.com/study-red-state-blue-state/?source=TPIpost


Billiejeens
by Emerald Member on Nov. 21, 2017 at 11:35 AM
2 moms liked this

Those are striking differences – with the surplus in debt that blue states have over their red counterparts being tenfold.


Here’s the good news: Years of disastrous liberal policies are turning state and local governments red. From 2008-2015, Democrats lost 35.7% of their governors and 20.3% of their seats in state legislatures.

GrayDuck41
by on Nov. 21, 2017 at 11:39 AM
3 moms liked this
https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/articles/2017-03-02/minnesota-ranks-no-3-among-best-states?context=amp

I live in a blue state. It's doing extremely well.
The state actually has a surplus.
It is ......wait for it....Spectacular!!!
Reading.Rainbow
by Sif on Nov. 21, 2017 at 11:39 AM
2 moms liked this

No, not really, I don't have any.   I'm in California   :)

Most of California's debt is tied up in mortgages...because we have bigger and nicer houses.

But as I'm sure you know... Richer States usually have more debt. Because of this reason... They're still the richer state though.

Quoting Billiejeens:

Do you know what debt is?

Quoting Reading.Rainbow:

We're #6 on the list :)

...

Quoting Sisteract:

Quoting Reading.Rainbow:

 HowMuch.net found that the states with the largest economies are California (13.3 percent), Texas (9.5 percent), and New York (8.1 percent). The states with the smallest economies are Vermont (0.2 percent), Maine, Rhode Island, North and South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and Alaska, all of which represent about 0.3 percent of the U.S. economy.

CA- is on par with many, many countries.

I'll stay- most can't afford to be here though-




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