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Ratko Mladić

Posted by on Nov. 22, 2017 at 10:58 PM
  • 17 Replies


Evstafiev-ratko-mladic-1993-w.jpg

Ratko Mladić was the general in charge of the Serbian army, between 1992 and 1995.

He was in charge when a lot of Muslims were killed, which is the solution that many posters on CafeMom have claimed that they support.


I would like people, when they hear such cries, perhaps dressed up in pretty words, to remember that when you put troops on the ground, their ears fueled with rhetoric about 'defending their homeland against the cancer that is Islamic Sharia', actions like those that happened under Mladić become inevitable.

by on Nov. 22, 2017 at 10:58 PM
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Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Nov. 22, 2017 at 10:58 PM

THE WORST moment in Ziba's life occurred when a dozen drunken Serbian militiamen stormed into the school gymnasium in which she and more than 100 other young Muslim women were being held along with their infant children. 'They came in with guns and grenades and they screamed at us,' Ziba's friend Emira recalls. 'The Chetniks shouted at us: 'Look at how many children you can have. Now you are going to have our children. You are going to have our little Chetniks.' They said they weren't interested in women who were expecting babies because they couldn't make them pregnant.'

Ziba, 26, mother of two, was among the first 12 women and girls to be selected by the Serbs at the Kalinovik camp. 'They called us 'bitches' and one of them pointed at me,' said Ziba. 'My two children were clinging to me and I was forced to leave them. They thought I was going to be killed.'

Ziba and 11 other young women - the youngest, Sanela, was only 16 - were driven to Kalinovik's only hotel. Five of the women, including Ziba, were from the eastern Bosnian town of Gacko, the rest from Kalinovik itself. 'They made us clean the rooms in the hotel, made us wash the floors then they gave us food at some tables,' Ziba recalls. 'It was all planned for us. No one was shouting any more. They gave us bread and meat and water. After the food they told us to go with them to the rooms. Two Chetniks took me upstairs. They were both drunk, both dirty. They had huge beards which were filthy. I could smell the drink on their breath. I asked if I would see Yasmin and Mirnes (her two infant boys) again and one of them said I would. I was terrified they were going to kill the children while I was in the hotel.

'Then one of the two Chetniks told me to undress. He said if I didn't do what they wanted, they would cut my throat. I believed them. So they both raped me, one after the other. It took half an hour. Then they took me out and put me with the other women who had been brought back from the rooms. We were all told to clean the hotel again and after we had done this they took us back to the gymnasium. From that day it never stopped. The rapes went on day and night for a month.'

(SOURCE)

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Nov. 22, 2017 at 10:59 PM

During the Bosnian War, and the Bosnian genocide, the violence assumed a gender-targeted form through the use of rape. The geographical, cultural, religious and political tensions that accompanied the rise of nationalism in the former Yugoslav created a breeding ground for gender inequalities, and more specifically a political climate that encouraged rape as a strategic wartime device.

It is believed that the Bosnian War resulted in an estimate of 25,000 to 50,000 incidences of rape and or sexual violence between the years 1991 and 1995. [2] More specifically, degrading the femininity of female victims represents an underlying theme of the military tactics used in the Bosnian War. Women were subjected to having their genitals mutilated by military instruments by means of having their "breasts cut off" and their "pregnant bellies torn open".[2]

While men from all ethnic groups committed rape, the great majority of rapes were perpetrated by Bosnian Serb forces of the Army of the Republika Srpska (VRS) and Serb paramilitary units, who used genocidal rape as an instrument of terror as part of their programme of ethnic cleansing.[5][6][7] Estimates of the total number of women raped during the war vary. The European Union estimates a total of 20,000, while the Bosnian Interior Ministry claims 50,000.[8] The UN Commission of Experts identified 1,600 cases of rape, while experts connected to UNHCR provided evidence of 12,000 rapes.[9][10] Other estimates confirm the 12,000 to 50,000 range.[11]

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Nov. 22, 2017 at 10:59 PM

Men and Boys

A lesser known form of rape during the war was that which was perpetrated against men and boys. Though no concrete number has been determined, it has been estimated that some 3,000 were raped during the conflict[57]. However, it is assumed that hundreds, if not thousands, of victims have never come forward due to their deaths as well as the stigma regarding sexual abuse[58][57]. Many male victims were found to have been ostracized from their communities, often being stripped of their masculinity or accused of homosexuality due to the predominantly masculinist culture in Bosnia[57]. Other victims feared that coming forward would result in further abuse[59][60].

A majority of the instances took place in detention camps[57]. Some of these crimes were also committed elsewhere, for example during home raids[57]. The range of abuse varied widely. Some victims were sexually tortured, while others were forced to torture fellow prisoners[57]. Acts included forced oral and anal sex, genital mutilation, and blunt trauma to the genitals[57].

Reasons for these crimes mainly revolved around the humiliation and the assertion of dominance over victims rather than the sexual satisfaction of the perpetrators[58].

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Nov. 22, 2017 at 10:59 PM

Radovan Stanković was a member of an elite paramilitary unit from Vukovar which was commanded by Pero Elez. Following the death of Elez, Stanković took command of Karaman's house, which he ran as a brothel.[98] On 14 November 2006, the domestic court in Sarajevo tried Stanković and he was given a 16-year sentence for forcing women into prostitution. 

Neđo Samardžić was given a sentence of 13 years and 4 months after he was found guilty of crimes against humanity. He had been indicted on ten counts, four of which he was found guilty of. These included multiple rape, beatings, murder, and forcing women to be sexual slaves.

Gojko Janković surrendered himself to the authorities in Bosnia in 2005. He was transferred to the Hague for trial but the ICTY sent him back to Bosnia to be tried before the domestic court. He was indicted for the rights violations of, aiding and abetting and issuing orders during an attack on the non-Serbian population which resulted in the killing, and sexual abuse of, non-Serbians, the majority of whom were Bosniak women and girls.

Dragan Damjanović (24 years in prison) was convicted of war crimes including murder, torture and rape.[103]

Momir Savić was given 18 years' imprisonment in July 2009 for crimes he had carried out while a commander of the Serbian armies "Višegrad Brigade". He was convicted for the repeated rape of a Bosniak woman, arson, looting and carrying out executions.[104][105]

On 12 January 2009, Željko Lelek was given 13 years' imprisonment for crimes against humanity, which included rape. 

Ante Kovač, who was a commander of the military police in the Croat Defence Council, was indicted on 25 March 2008 on war crimes carried out against Bosniaks in the municipality of Vitez in 1993. The charges included allegations of rapes carried out at detention camps in the region.[111] Kovač was cleared on one count of rape but found guilty on another. He was sentenced to 9 years' imprisonment.[112]

Veselin Vlahović, also known as "Batko" or the "Monster of Grbavica", was sentenced to 45 years' imprisonment in March 2013, having been found guilty on more than sixty counts, including the murder, rape and torture of Bosniak and Croat civilians during the Siege of Sarajevo.

Reading.Rainbow
by Sif on Nov. 22, 2017 at 11:09 PM
1 mom liked this

I think it's important to learn as much as we can about these horrible crimes, ignorance of them is how they happen again.

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Nov. 22, 2017 at 11:16 PM

The victims were separated at Koricanske Stijene from a convoy transporting more than 1,200 people expelled from their homes. They were lined up at the top of a pit and shot at. Dozens of them survived.

To date, eleven wartime members of the Bosnian Serb police forces have been sentenced for the crime.

The exhumation at the site begun in early September. The remains will be transported on Friday to a morgue where their identities will be determined by DNA tests, Cengic said.

"In five previous exhumations in this area, conducted between 2003 and 2013, the remains of 117 victims were found and we were searching for 98 more victims," she said.

In another mass grave, uncovered last week near the eastern town of Vlasenica, remains of 10 victims, probably Bosnian Muslims killed in 1992, were exhumed.

At the end of the war, 31,500 people were reported missing. Since then, the remains of 25,000 victims have been exhumed from hundreds of mass graves, according to the Bosnian institute, leaving 6,500 unaccounted for.

SOURCE



Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Nov. 22, 2017 at 11:21 PM

Image result for serbian genocide mass graves


Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Nov. 22, 2017 at 11:21 PM

Image result for serbian genocide mass graves

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Nov. 22, 2017 at 11:22 PM

Image result for serbian genocide mass graves

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Nov. 22, 2017 at 11:23 PM

Image result for serbian genocide mass graves

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