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Here's How the End of Net Neutrality Will Change the Internet

Posted by on Nov. 24, 2017 at 9:39 AM
  • 26 Replies
1 mom liked this
Internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon may soon be free to block content, slow video-streaming services from rivals, and offer “fast lanes” to preferred partners. For a glimpse of how the internet experience may change, look at what broadband providers are doing under the existing “net neutrality” rules.

When AT&T customers access its DirecTV Now video-streaming service, the data doesn’t count against their plan’s data limits. Verizon, likewise, exempts its Go90 service from its customers’ data plans. T-Mobile allows multiple video and music streaming services to bypass its data limits, essentially allowing it to pick winners and losers in those categories.

Consumers will likely see more arrangements like these, granting or blocking access to specific content, if the Federal Communications Commission next month repeals Obama-era net neutrality rules that ban broadband providers from discriminating against lawful content providers. The commission outlined its proposed changes on Tuesday, and published them Wednesday. The proposal would also ban states from passing their own versions of the old rules. Because Republicans have a majority in the agency, the proposal will likely pass and take effect early next year.

Because many internet services for mobile devices include limits on data use, the changes will be visible there first. In one dramatic scenario, internet services would begin to resemble cable-TV packages, where subscriptions could be limited to a few dozen sites and services. Or, for big spenders, a few hundred. Fortunately, that’s not a likely scenario. Instead, expect a gradual shift towards subscriptions that provide unlimited access to certain preferred providers while charging extra for everything else.

Net neutrality advocates have long worried that these sorts of preferential offerings harm competition, and by extension, consumers, by making it harder for smaller providers to compete. A company like Netflix or Amazon can likely shell out to sponsor data, but smaller companies don't necessarily have the budget.

"Net neutrality is incredibly important for small startups like Discord because all internet traffic needs to be treated as equal for us all to have access to the same resources as the big companies," says Jason Citron, co-founder and CEO of the videogame-centric chat and video-conferencing app Discord. Citron's company is well funded and boasts 45 million users. But it competes with larger players like Microsoft's Skype, Google's Hangouts, and Facebook's WhatsApp. Even if Discord can offer a better experience for gamers, bigger companies might be able to gain an advantage by partnering with broadband providers to prioritize or subsidize their apps.

For even smaller video providers, the end of net neutrality could be dire. "We believe this would affect more than just our voice and video equipment, but our entire ability to host folks interacting across our services," says Nolan T. Jones, managing partner and co-creator of Roll20, a video-conferencing and community platform for tabletop role-playing gamers.

WIRED
https://apple.news/AEpqkiA65QzKaQjJzKFPF6A
by on Nov. 24, 2017 at 9:39 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Wolffie
by Bronze Member on Nov. 24, 2017 at 11:31 AM
My hubs is pissed about this. And it takes a lot to ruffle his feathers.
nb34
by Platinum Member on Nov. 24, 2017 at 11:38 AM

This is a disaster.

nb34
by Platinum Member on Nov. 24, 2017 at 11:39 AM

As an educator I especially find this a travesty.

Seashell77
by Bronze Member on Nov. 24, 2017 at 8:49 PM


Quoting nb34:

As an educator I especially find this a travesty.

I am not an educator, but from your perspective, how would this negatively impact on students?  In regard to students using the internet to serch for information (ie: for research, reports for school) and learning opportunities. Does this change mean that to have better access to information on the internet, you would need to pay large sums of money for this? 

AdrianneHill
by Ruby Member on Nov. 24, 2017 at 9:04 PM
Information monopolies
nb34
by Platinum Member on Nov. 24, 2017 at 9:25 PM
4 moms liked this

Yes. That's exactly what it means. This means certain companies are going to control what you see, based on how much they are paid. It's a very bad idea. It's like supermarket shelving, but for information.


Quoting Seashell77:

Quoting nb34:

As an educator I especially find this a travesty.

I am not an educator, but from your perspective, how would this negatively impact on students?  In regard to students using the internet to serch for information (ie: for research, reports for school) and learning opportunities. Does this change mean that to have better access to information on the internet, you would need to pay large sums of money for this? 


Seashell77
by Bronze Member on Nov. 24, 2017 at 9:46 PM

That is terrible. I hope and pray this does't go through. 

Quoting nb34:

Yes. That's exactly what it means. This means certain companies are going to control what you see, based on how much they are paid. It's a very bad idea. It's like supermarket shelving, but for information.


Quoting Seashell77:

Quoting nb34:

As an educator I especially find this a travesty.

I am not an educator, but from your perspective, how would this negatively impact on students?  In regard to students using the internet to serch for information (ie: for research, reports for school) and learning opportunities. Does this change mean that to have better access to information on the internet, you would need to pay large sums of money for this? 


NWP
by guerrilla girl on Nov. 24, 2017 at 9:51 PM
2 moms liked this
I would hope this could be a unifying non-partisan concern.

Call your congressmen and women!!!!!
Donna6503
by Platinum Member on Nov. 24, 2017 at 10:16 PM
1 mom liked this
If you're a fan of liberties and individual rights; then ending net neutrality will help you continue being a fan of such liberties.
stacymomof2
by Ruby Member on Nov. 24, 2017 at 10:45 PM
How so?

Quoting Donna6503: If you're a fan of liberties and individual rights; then ending net neutrality will help you continue being a fan of such liberties.
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