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OT--Health disparities amongst Black Americans and or LGBTQ community

Posted by on Jan. 16, 2018 at 9:06 AM
  • 35 Replies

I am doing some research about health disparities amongst the gay community, and or the black community. 

Reasearch has shown that many in the black community or in the LGTBQ community do not continue to get health care, because of distrust with the medical community--per an article from Thehill, which I cannot paste for some reason here.

I want to hear from some women that are part of these communities, what would be a reason, you or your family wouldnt get the continued care that they need. 

Thanks so much.

by on Jan. 16, 2018 at 9:06 AM
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Replies (1-10):
M4LG5
by Gold Member on Jan. 16, 2018 at 9:18 AM
1 mom liked this
I am not black or LGBTQ but a friend of mine is both. One of his concerns as a trans man is finding a doctor that understands him as a trans man. He has felt some of the medical world is still behind in their understanding and dealing with people like him.

What's funny is that he also said something to the effect of "and I don't want someone that will order a bunch of medicine I don't need." Haha. I grew up low income (half mexican) and I remember my parents making decisions about things that were "not necessary"
billsfan1104
by Emerald Member on Jan. 16, 2018 at 9:22 AM
1 mom liked this
Thank you for this. It was very eye opening and I appreciate you taking the time out to share it with me. I will definitely use this.


Quoting nb34:

This is a very eye openning read from NPR.

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/07/568948782/black-mothers-keep-dying-after-giving-birth-shalon-irvings-story-explains-why

billsfan1104
by Emerald Member on Jan. 16, 2018 at 9:31 AM
Did you find a language barrier was a problem as well, that’s if your parents didn’t speak English.

Quoting M4LG5: I am not black or LGBTQ but a friend of mine is both. One of his concerns as a trans man is finding a doctor that understands him as a trans man. He has felt some of the medical world is still behind in their understanding and dealing with people like him.

What's funny is that he also said something to the effect of "and I don't want someone that will order a bunch of medicine I don't need." Haha. I grew up low income (half mexican) and I remember my parents making decisions about things that were "not necessary"
Debmomto2teens
by Ruby Member on Jan. 16, 2018 at 9:33 AM
4 moms liked this

Healthy People 2020 gives statistics on health disparities.  It is also very eye opening.  I use a documentary called World's Apart in my class.  One vignette is an African American man on dialysis and is perception of the inequality of healthcare. He talks about seeing more white people getting a new kidney.  Also, he discusses how events such as Tuskegee Experiment have contributed to the AA communities lack of trust in the medical community. 

Quoting nb34:

This is a very eye openning read from NPR.

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/07/568948782/black-mothers-keep-dying-after-giving-birth-shalon-irvings-story-explains-why


SuG4
by Firestarter on Jan. 16, 2018 at 9:38 AM
1 mom liked this
THAT was an eye opener. I read this a few weeks ago.

Quoting nb34:

This is a very eye openning read from NPR.

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/07/568948782/black-mothers-keep-dying-after-giving-birth-shalon-irvings-story-explains-why

Reading.Rainbow
by Sif on Jan. 16, 2018 at 10:19 AM
1 mom liked this

Have you ever seen the movie Miss Evers' Boys ?

True story, that's a huge reason for mistrust.




In 1932 Macon County, Alabama, the federal government launched into a medical study called The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Blacks with Syphilis. The study selected 412 men infected with the disease and faked long term treatment, while really only giving them placebos and liniments. The premise of the action was to determine if blacks reacted similar to whites to the overall effects of the disease. The experiment was only discontinued 40 years later when a Senate investigation was initiated. At that time, only 127 of the original study group were left alive. The story is told from the point of view of Nurse Eunice Evers, who was well aware of the lack of treatment being offered, but felt her role was to console the involved men, many of whom were her direct friends. In fact, the movie's name comes from the fact that a performing dancer and three musicians named their act for her - "Miss Evers' Boys". All had the disease. A romance with one goes unrequited even after he joins the Army during World War II and is treated and cured by penicillin. As the result of the Senate investigation, the medical experimentation on humans has been curbed. 

M4LG5
by Gold Member on Jan. 16, 2018 at 10:22 AM
1 mom liked this
My dad is first generation Americannd my mom is as white as can be. It wasn't language....it was more about money. Also, the perception toward anything medical is "only if you need it". Unfortunately, my parents didn't understand that ongoing check ups (medical and dental) could prevent future, expensive work

Quoting billsfan1104: Did you find a language barrier was a problem as well, that’s if your parents didn’t speak English.

Quoting M4LG5: I am not black or LGBTQ but a friend of mine is both. One of his concerns as a trans man is finding a doctor that understands him as a trans man. He has felt some of the medical world is still behind in their understanding and dealing with people like him.

What's funny is that he also said something to the effect of "and I don't want someone that will order a bunch of medicine I don't need." Haha. I grew up low income (half mexican) and I remember my parents making decisions about things that were "not necessary"
Debmomto2teens
by Ruby Member on Jan. 16, 2018 at 10:24 AM
1 mom liked this
I have read a lot on this experiment and it is really unbelievable that anyone thought this was ethical. It is one of the main reasons there is such tight controls on human subjects now.

Even when I am just doing research on education interventions, I have to go thru IRB. People complain but there is a good reason for it.


Quoting Reading.Rainbow:

Have you ever seen the movie Miss Evers' Boys ?

True story, that's a huge reason for mistrust.

In 1932 Macon County, Alabama, the federal government launched into a medical study called The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Blacks with Syphilis. The study selected 412 men infected with the disease and faked long term treatment, while really only giving them placebos and liniments. The premise of the action was to determine if blacks reacted similar to whites to the overall effects of the disease. The experiment was only discontinued 40 years later when a Senate investigation was initiated. At that time, only 127 of the original study group were left alive. The story is told from the point of view of Nurse Eunice Evers, who was well aware of the lack of treatment being offered, but felt her role was to console the involved men, many of whom were her direct friends. In fact, the movie's name comes from the fact that a performing dancer and three musicians named their act for her - "Miss Evers' Boys". All had the disease. A romance with one goes unrequited even after he joins the Army during World War II and is treated and cured by penicillin. As the result of the Senate investigation, the medical experimentation on humans has been curbed. 

billsfan1104
by Emerald Member on Jan. 16, 2018 at 10:27 AM
Thank you so much for your perspective.
I have done more research, and it seems that many of the migrant workers think like that as well. They will take a pain pill like Advil or Asprin before going to the doctors.


Quoting M4LG5: My dad is first generation Americannd my mom is as white as can be. It wasn't language....it was more about money. Also, the perception toward anything medical is "only if you need it". Unfortunately, my parents didn't understand that ongoing check ups (medical and dental) could prevent future, expensive work

Quoting billsfan1104: Did you find a language barrier was a problem as well, that’s if your parents didn’t speak English.

Quoting M4LG5: I am not black or LGBTQ but a friend of mine is both. One of his concerns as a trans man is finding a doctor that understands him as a trans man. He has felt some of the medical world is still behind in their understanding and dealing with people like him.

What's funny is that he also said something to the effect of "and I don't want someone that will order a bunch of medicine I don't need." Haha. I grew up low income (half mexican) and I remember my parents making decisions about things that were "not necessary"
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