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Live Longer - Cut Back on Red Meat - Do you eat a lot of red meat?

Posted by on Mar. 24, 2009 at 7:08 AM
  • 21 Replies

 Want to live longer? Cut back on red meat

 

  • Study: Big red meat eaters had higher risk of dying over 10-year period
  • Higher mortality mostly result of cardiovascular disease or cancer
  • People who ate the most white meat had slightly lower mortality risk during study
  • Researchers looked at more than 500,000 people who were aged 50 to 71
  •  

     Health

    Burger lovers beware: People who eat red meat every day have a higher risk of dying over a 10-year period -- mostly because of cardiovascular disease or cancer --than their peers who eat less red or processed meat, according to a new study of about half a million people.

    People who ate the most red meat had about a 30 percent greater risk of dying than those who ate the least.

    People who ate the most red meat had about a 30 percent greater risk of dying than those who ate the least.

    "This is the biggest and highest quality study like this," says Barry M. Popkin, Ph.D., from the University of North Carolina, who wrote an editorial accompanying the study, which was published Monday in Archives of Internal Medicine. "They collected the diet data very carefully, and it's saying to people, 'You don't have to eat red meat every day.' "

    In the study, a research team led by Rashmi Sinha, Ph.D., from the National Cancer Institute in Rockville, Maryland, looked at more than 500,000 people who were aged 50 to 71 when they enrolled in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health study.

    Over a 10-year period, people who ate the most red meat every day (about 62.5 grams per 1,000 calories per day, equivalent to a quarter-pound burger or small steak per day) had about a 30 percent greater risk of dying compared with those who consumed the least amount of red meat (a median of 9.8 grams per 1,000 calories per day). The excess mortality was mostly the result of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Health.com: No-brainer guide to healthy portions

    The red meat in the study included all types of beef and pork, including bacon, cold cuts, ham, hamburgers, hot dogs, and steak, as well as meat in pizza, chili, lasagna, and stew.

    In addition, those who ate the largest amounts of processed meat (defined as about 22.6 grams per 1,000 calories per day of bacon, red-meat sausage, poultry sausage, cold cuts, ham, regular hot dogs, and low-fat hot dogs) also had a slightly higher mortality risk than those who consumed the least.

    In contrast, people who ate the most white meat seemed to have a slightly lower mortality risk during the study than those who consumed the least amount of white meat. White meat included chicken, turkey, and fish, as well as some poultry products and canned tuna.

    The researchers estimate that 11 percent of deaths in men and 16 percent of deaths in women during the study could have been prevented by reducing consumption of red meat. Health.com: How I survived a heart attack at 43

    The American Institute of Cancer Research recommends that people consume less than 18 ounces of red meat (the equivalent of a child-size fast-food hamburger) per week to reduce the risk for cancer, and the American Heart Association recommends limiting saturated fats to less than 7 percent of total daily calories. (Animal products, such as meat and dairy, tend to be higher in saturated fat.) The United States Department of Agriculture food pyramid recommends two to three daily servings of protein, which can include lean meat, but can also come from plant sources. Health.com: Meat and dairy: How much should you eat for heart health?

    "It is important that people understand that they do not need to give up eating red meat, but should pay a little closer attention to how much they eat," says Lona Sandon, R.D., a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association and an assistant professor at UT Southwestern in Dallas, Texas. "Many people, particularly women, come up short on the nutrients that red meat has to offer."

    Red meat contains protein, iron, zinc, selenium, and B vitamins that are important to the body and help prevent nutrient deficiency, says Sandon.

    Sandon recommends that people replace high-fat red and processed meats with protein-rich foods such as poultry or fish, beans, eggs, and low-fat dairy. Also, she adds, filling half a plate with vegetables and a quarter with meat will help keep portions in control. Health.com: Fiber, starch, fats, and serving sizes: Eat right advice for your diet

    "What we need to keep in mind about this study is that it does not prove that red meat causes increased death; it simply shows an association," she says. "The study relied on people's recall of what they typically eat, which does not always match what they actually consumed."

    Popkin says that consuming meat in moderation is important for our diet, as well as the health of the planet. Americans consume around four times more meat and dairy than the rest of the world, which may contribute to a number of global concerns, including an increased demand and price for meat, increased greenhouse gases, and a rise in disease, he says.

    "All we have to do is eat red meat more infrequently and cut out the sausages and hot dogs," he says. "If we cut ours down just a little bit, it would be all it took because we consume so much."

     


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    by on Mar. 24, 2009 at 7:08 AM
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    Replies (1-10):
    yiayiaann
    by on Mar. 24, 2009 at 7:15 AM

    I HAVE CUT DOWN ON RED MEAT NOT BECAUSE OF HEALTH ISSUES SO MUCH, BUT OF COST. I EAT IT ABOUT ONCE A WEEK, NOW WE EAT MOSTLY CHICKEN,TURKEY AND FISH..

    Junebug926
    by Bronze Member on Mar. 24, 2009 at 8:05 AM

    We eat red meat but in moderation.

    dr_m
    by on Mar. 24, 2009 at 11:21 AM

    no, i don't eat a lot of red meat, but sometimes get the urge for a nice juicy steak, or a roast beef sandwich !

     

    jojo959
    by on Mar. 24, 2009 at 11:25 AM

    I eat some red meat but most we eat alot of chicken and turkey when I make spaghetti I use ground turkey it's pretty good   and it's healthy for you

    forsythia_18
    by on Mar. 24, 2009 at 11:35 AM

    Red meat is not bad for you.  However, now that we don't have to hunt, kill, and prepare the meat ourselves, it's easier to access it.  It has become an overindulgence.  Every once and a while is good for you but certainly not everyday.

    sweetie00
    by on Mar. 24, 2009 at 12:32 PM

    For the most part, we've switched to turkey. Lean ground turkey, turkey dogs, etc. More expensive, but we also eat less of it. DH's cholesterol is very high, so we made some changes. Very rarely, we barbecue steak or have a regular burger. Thanks for the post!

    Esmrlda
    by on Mar. 24, 2009 at 12:54 PM

    I like to shop at an organic store.  You cant beat organic meat and dairy. It dosent have all those hormones. Tastes better too.  We eat red meat about 2-3 times a week. My DD18 is a vegetarian and my SD9 is a carnivore. And of coarse DH likes red meat. I would be happy with a salad and a chicken breast.  So its hard to please everyone.

    sweetie00
    by on Mar. 24, 2009 at 7:07 PM

    P.S.- Producing 1 pound of meat requires 8 pounds of grain....Something else to think about. Lot's of good reasons to give it up.

    hsteele
    by on Mar. 24, 2009 at 8:21 PM

    Found this article for some additionaly info.

    http://www.sixwise.com/newsletters/07/07/18/Eating_Red_Meat_Once_and_for_All_Is_it_Bad_for_You_or_Good_for_You.htm

    Eating Red Meat: Once and for All,
    Is it Bad for You or Good for You?
    by www.SixWise.com


    Whether or not red meat can be included as part of a healthy diet is one of the most hotly debated topics in the nutrition field. From a purely health-minded perspective (there are those, of course, who choose not to eat meat for ethical reasons) the conventional and naturalist camps are clearly divided.

    Should You Limit or Avoid Red Meat in Your Diet?

    red meat

    According to the American Dietetic Association, lean beef is equal to skinless chicken when it comes to lowering cholesterol.

    The mainstream perspective in the United States is that red meat should be a very limited part of a healthy diet. This is primarily based on the fact that it contains saturated fat, which the American Heart Association says is the main dietary cause of high blood cholesterol.

    Meanwhile, studies have linked red meat to a number of chronic diseases, including:

    • Breast cancer

    • Colon cancer

    • Prostate cancer

    • Heart disease

    Conventionally speaking, it is because of findings like these that the common healthy diet mantra in the United States sounds something like this:

    "The less red meat the better," says Dr. Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. "At most, it should be eaten only occasionally. And it may be maximally effective not to eat red meat at all."

    Red Meat Does Contain Healthy Nutrients

    Then there are those who point out that red meat does have some redeeming qualities.

    "Meat is the single richest source of iron and zinc and contributes significant amounts of vitamins," says Mary Abbott Hess, a registered dietitian and former president of the American Dietetic Association (ADA).

    Meanwhile, a three-ounce serving of beef provides 50 percent of the daily recommended protein, along with beneficial B vitamins. And as for all that saturated fat, according to the ADA "more than half the fatty acids in beef are monounsaturated, the same type of fatty acids found in olive oil and championed for their heart-healthy properties. In addition, approximately one-third of the saturated fat in beef is stearic acid, which is shown to have a neutral effect on blood cholesterol."

    red meat

    Grilling red meat can lead to the formation of cancer-causing heterocyclic amines.

    The ADA advises that Americans can eat six ounces of lean red meat five or more days a week and still be eating a diet that could decrease cholesterol levels. Surprisingly, they say lean beef is just as effective as skinless chicken when it comes to lowering cholesterol.

    If You Eat Red Meat, What Kind is Best?

    There are those in the natural health field who oppose red meat for ethical reasons, and there are those who are fans of red meat ... as long as it comes from quality sources.

    Conventional meat is typically raised on corporate factory farms that are inhumane to animals and unhealthy for you. Animals raised in mass factory farms are pumped full of antibiotics, hormones and other drugs (about 70 percent of all antibiotics and similar drugs produced in the United States are given to livestock and poultry), while being fed an unhealthy mix of pesticide-laden grains.

    If you are not familiar with factory-farming practices and what that means for the food you feed your family, The Meat You Eat: How Corporate Farming Has Endangered America's Food Supply, is a highly recommended book on the topic. It's a quick read, and one that can help lead to a positive transformation in both a big-picture and personal sense.

    When it comes to red meat, choosing sources that have been raised in humane, natural ways --- which means being raised on pasture, or grass-fed -- is the healthier choice, according to many experts. Grass-fed beef has been found to contain less fat and more omega-3 fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and other beneficial compounds compared to grain-fed beef.

    What About Cooking and Processing?

    Adding to the complexity, the way red meat is cooked and processed can also impact its nutritional value. Processed meats are known to be among the worst way to consume red meats because they contain a number of additives, one being sodium nitrite, a preservative that's been linked to cancer.

    Cooking red meat at high temperatures, such as frying, searing, grilling or broiling, is also problematic. It's known to produce heterocyclic amines, chemicals that may cause cancer.

    Add up all of the above and you're left with a personal decision that only you can make. While some say you're better off avoiding red meat entirely, others point out its beneficial nutrients, particularly when it comes from a healthy, humanely raised grass-fed animal.

    Recommended Reading

    What is REALLY in a Hot Dog? And How Unhealthy Are They?

    The Number of Approved Meat Additives Expanded by the FDA -- and None of the Additives Need to be on the Label

    Heather

    Proud Pagan Mama

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin~

    Eilish
    by on Mar. 24, 2009 at 8:31 PM


    Quoting forsythia_18:

    Red meat is not bad for you.  However, now that we don't have to hunt, kill, and prepare the meat ourselves, it's easier to access it.  It has become an overindulgence.  Every once and a while is good for you but certainly not everyday.

    Ditto!


    ....Now Pork on the other hand, IS bad for you ....

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