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College Course needing to do a paper, taking a poll please help me out.

Posted by on May. 14, 2009 at 8:28 AM
  • 14 Replies

 

Poll

Question: Should the doctor be able to assist in the suicide of a person who is terminally ill or suffering from a painful disease?

Options:

yes

no

indifferent


Only group members can vote in this poll.

Total Votes: 34

View Results

Almost finished with my paper but wanted to get others opinions on this subject. Thanks for your opinions in advance.

 

As im sure everyone has heard of Jack Kevorkian, Dr. Death,  he specialized in euthanization or assisted suicide.

Please also leave why you believe this

by on May. 14, 2009 at 8:28 AM
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Replies (1-10):
athenax3
by on May. 14, 2009 at 8:29 AM

I gave my final persausive speech on this topic! Good luck on your paper!

I believe in assisted suicide as an alternative for those who are suffering from incurable often painful, humiliatiing and terminal illness. It is what I would want for myself, and I think if it's possible and available people SHOULD be allowed the option of avoiding the last indignities of illness and death. If it be a sin or against God, I am content to let the individual come to terms with that issue for themselves- as I will should I ever need to make the choice.


PurdueMom
by Sherri on May. 14, 2009 at 8:43 AM

I'm sorry I couldn't vote.  The "yes" and "no" are too black and white, and I'm not indifferent to this issue.

I would agree that physicians should be allowed to assist in suicides, but only in a very limited and indirect way.  For example, writing a prescription for a lethal dose of a sedative, but not being involved in the filling of the prescription nor the ingestion of such.        

Sherri
athenax3
by on May. 14, 2009 at 8:51 AM


Quoting PurdueMom:

I'm sorry I couldn't vote.  The "yes" and "no" are too black and white, and I'm not indifferent to this issue.

I would agree that physicians should be allowed to assist in suicides, but only in a very limited and indirect way.  For example, writing a prescription for a lethal dose of a sedative, but not being involved in the filling of the prescription nor the ingestion of such.        

I defintely think there would have to be very specific guidelines and procedural rules regarding this type of thing. And of course no matter how many safety precautions are taken some will find a way to abuse this proposed right-someone always does.


PurdueMom
by Sherri on May. 14, 2009 at 9:03 AM


Quoting athenax3:

 

Quoting PurdueMom:

I'm sorry I couldn't vote.  The "yes" and "no" are too black and white, and I'm not indifferent to this issue.

I would agree that physicians should be allowed to assist in suicides, but only in a very limited and indirect way.  For example, writing a prescription for a lethal dose of a sedative, but not being involved in the filling of the prescription nor the ingestion of such.        

I defintely think there would have to be very specific guidelines and procedural rules regarding this type of thing. And of course no matter how many safety precautions are taken some will find a way to abuse this proposed right-someone always does.


Yes, this is definitely why I have problems with this issue.   I'm an RN who worked critical care for many years.  I have run into some pretty unsavory family members who were making decisions when a patient was at his/her most vulnerable state.   

I have read many times people's posts regarding end-of-life issues and it scares me how callous many people are about it.  Unless you have been there, it's hard to fathom how hard it really is. 

 

Sherri
athenax3
by on May. 14, 2009 at 9:10 AM


Quoting PurdueMom:


Quoting athenax3:

 

Quoting PurdueMom:

I'm sorry I couldn't vote.  The "yes" and "no" are too black and white, and I'm not indifferent to this issue.

I would agree that physicians should be allowed to assist in suicides, but only in a very limited and indirect way.  For example, writing a prescription for a lethal dose of a sedative, but not being involved in the filling of the prescription nor the ingestion of such.        

I defintely think there would have to be very specific guidelines and procedural rules regarding this type of thing. And of course no matter how many safety precautions are taken some will find a way to abuse this proposed right-someone always does.


Yes, this is definitely why I have problems with this issue.   I'm an RN who worked critical care for many years.  I have run into some pretty unsavory family members who were making decisions when a patient was at his/her most vulnerable state.   

I have read many times people's posts regarding end-of-life issues and it scares me how callous many people are about it.  Unless you have been there, it's hard to fathom how hard it really is. 

 

And that is the biggest and most logical argument against assisted suicide- and a very valid one at that- how to keep greedy or simply black hearted family members from making this an UNwilling choice for the patient- if we could address this issue, I think this issue could move forward.

In my case, my proposal was simply that only patients deemed of sound mind by thier physician could make the choice for THEMSELVES- no one has the authority to make the decision for anyone else. But this too leaves some loopholes, as will any proposed solutions, but I feel it closes a significant window of opportunity for abuse.


momaof8
by Bronze Member on May. 14, 2009 at 9:15 AM

I think it is a slippert slope when we decide the worth of someone.

Quoting athenax3:

 

Quoting PurdueMom:


Quoting athenax3:

 

Quoting PurdueMom:

I'm sorry I couldn't vote.  The "yes" and "no" are too black and white, and I'm not indifferent to this issue.

I would agree that physicians should be allowed to assist in suicides, but only in a very limited and indirect way.  For example, writing a prescription for a lethal dose of a sedative, but not being involved in the filling of the prescription nor the ingestion of such.        

I defintely think there would have to be very specific guidelines and procedural rules regarding this type of thing. And of course no matter how many safety precautions are taken some will find a way to abuse this proposed right-someone always does.


Yes, this is definitely why I have problems with this issue.   I'm an RN who worked critical care for many years.  I have run into some pretty unsavory family members who were making decisions when a patient was at his/her most vulnerable state.   

I have read many times people's posts regarding end-of-life issues and it scares me how callous many people are about it.  Unless you have been there, it's hard to fathom how hard it really is. 

 

And that is the biggest and most logical argument against assisted suicide- and a very valid one at that- how to keep greedy or simply black hearted family members from making this an UNwilling choice for the patient- if we could address this issue, I think this issue could move forward.

In my case, my proposal was simply that only patients deemed of sound mind by thier physician could make the choice for THEMSELVES- no one has the authority to make the decision for anyone else. But this too leaves some loopholes, as will any proposed solutions, but I feel it closes a significant window of opportunity for abuse.


DawnVirgin
by Member on May. 14, 2009 at 9:19 AM

I voted yes, but only at the request of the patient themselves. No family members involved unless it is in writing from the patient that these are their wishes.

PurdueMom
by Sherri on May. 14, 2009 at 9:43 AM

I just want to point out the question was not whether people have the right to decide when they die during a terminal illness/condition, but whether a doctor should be able to assist in the suicide.  I think my previous response got me off track...

When you have a patient who is being kept alive by breathing machines, medications, and/or feeding tubes and there is no hope of recovery, I believe any physician would support stopping the life-preserving measures when the patient and family is ready.  However, asking them (physicians) to assist in the actual 'killing' a terminally ill patient is another matter, even if it's the patient's wish.   The fine line is in one case we are prolonging death artificially, the other is we are hastening death artificially, follow me? 

There are ways to make death comfortable and natural, through Hospice, for example.  Dying doesn't have to be an uncomfortable nor a painful process.  We have the means to make a person comfortable at the end of his or her life, and I am more comfortable following that path as are many physicians.  I personally would not follow a physician's order to inject a lethal dose of morphine, and I would not expect a physician to do what I would not do myself.   This is just my opinion, of course.  I respect that not everyone will agree with me.

Sherri
athenax3
by on May. 14, 2009 at 1:13 PM


Quoting PurdueMom:

I just want to point out the question was not whether people have the right to decide when they die during a terminal illness/condition, but whether a doctor should be able to assist in the suicide.  I think my previous response got me off track...

When you have a patient who is being kept alive by breathing machines, medications, and/or feeding tubes and there is no hope of recovery, I believe any physician would support stopping the life-preserving measures when the patient and family is ready.  However, asking them (physicians) to assist in the actual 'killing' a terminally ill patient is another matter, even if it's the patient's wish.   The fine line is in one case we are prolonging death artificially, the other is we are hastening death artificially, follow me? 

There are ways to make death comfortable and natural, through Hospice, for example.  Dying doesn't have to be an uncomfortable nor a painful process.  We have the means to make a person comfortable at the end of his or her life, and I am more comfortable following that path as are many physicians.  I personally would not follow a physician's order to inject a lethal dose of morphine, and I would not expect a physician to do what I would not do myself.   This is just my opinion, of course.  I respect that not everyone will agree with me.


Excellent points.


athenax3
by on May. 14, 2009 at 1:16 PM

I agree it could definitley be a crack into the door of things we aren't anticipating- but in regards to deciding the worth of someone, I don't consider assisted suicide deciding the worth of life or human beings, I think of it as an individual deciding for themselves what they are willing to endure, and since ultimately it is thier pain, thier life, thier body- I fully condone giving those capable of doing so the ability to make this decision for themselves, and if there are physicians willing and of the same view to aid patients in this endeavor I think it should allowed- again, under strict and well outline regulation.

Quoting momaof8:

I think it is a slippert slope when we decide the worth of someone.

Quoting athenax3:

 

Quoting PurdueMom:


Quoting athenax3:

 

Quoting PurdueMom:

I'm sorry I couldn't vote.  The "yes" and "no" are too black and white, and I'm not indifferent to this issue.

I would agree that physicians should be allowed to assist in suicides, but only in a very limited and indirect way.  For example, writing a prescription for a lethal dose of a sedative, but not being involved in the filling of the prescription nor the ingestion of such.        

I defintely think there would have to be very specific guidelines and procedural rules regarding this type of thing. And of course no matter how many safety precautions are taken some will find a way to abuse this proposed right-someone always does.


Yes, this is definitely why I have problems with this issue.   I'm an RN who worked critical care for many years.  I have run into some pretty unsavory family members who were making decisions when a patient was at his/her most vulnerable state.   

I have read many times people's posts regarding end-of-life issues and it scares me how callous many people are about it.  Unless you have been there, it's hard to fathom how hard it really is. 

 

And that is the biggest and most logical argument against assisted suicide- and a very valid one at that- how to keep greedy or simply black hearted family members from making this an UNwilling choice for the patient- if we could address this issue, I think this issue could move forward.

In my case, my proposal was simply that only patients deemed of sound mind by thier physician could make the choice for THEMSELVES- no one has the authority to make the decision for anyone else. But this too leaves some loopholes, as will any proposed solutions, but I feel it closes a significant window of opportunity for abuse.

 



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