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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Ahmadinejad won; get over it

Posted by on Jun. 21, 2009 at 4:54 PM
  • 11 Replies

But one could more plausibly suggest that if a “coup” is being attempted, it has been mounted by the losers in Friday’s election. It was Mousavi, after all, who declared victory on Friday even before Iran’s polls closed. And three days before the election, Mousavi supporter Rafsanjani published a letter criticizing the leader’s failure to rein in Ahmadinejad’s resort to “such ugly and sin-infected phenomena as insults, lies and false allegations.” Many Iranians took this letter as an indication that the Mousavi camp was concerned their candidate had fallen behind in the campaign’s closing days.

They ignore the fact that Ahmadinejad’s 62.6 percent of the vote in this year’s election is essentially the same as the 61.69 percent he received in the final count of the 2005 presidential election, when he trounced former President Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani. The shock of the “Iran experts” over Friday’s results is entirely self-generated, based on their preferred assumptions and wishful thinking.

Although Iran’s elections are not free by Western standards, the Islamic Republic has a 30-year history of highly contested and competitive elections at the presidential, parliamentary and local levels. Manipulation has always been there, as it is in many other countries.

But upsets occur — as, most notably, with Mohammed Khatami’s surprise victory in the 1997 presidential election. Moreover, “blowouts” also occur — as in Khatami’s reelection in 2001, Ahmadinejad’s first victory in 2005 and, we would argue, this year.

Like much of the Western media, most American “Iran experts” overstated Mir Hossein Mousavi’s “surge” over the campaign’s final weeks. More important, they were oblivious — as in 2005 — to Ahmadinejad’s effectiveness as a populist politician and campaigner. American “Iran experts” missed how Ahmadinejad was perceived by most Iranians as having won the nationally televised debates with his three opponents — especially his debate with Mousavi.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/articles/39/Ahmadinejad_won_get_over_it.html

by on Jun. 21, 2009 at 4:54 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Eilish
by on Jun. 21, 2009 at 4:55 PM

This really sounds like the Arab version of the Bush-Gore election.


mrs_khan07
by Silver Member on Jun. 21, 2009 at 5:07 PM

Once again Teri, awesome post. And it does sound like like our own Bush/Gore election.

Mrs. Khan

Gypsyuma
by Gold Member on Jun. 21, 2009 at 7:00 PM

I don't know who REALLY won, but what I do know is that this country has no business sticking their nose in it.  Iran has to work out Iran's problems.

As for speaking out against abuse of protestors, given our past and current relationship with Iran, I still do not feel we are in a position to butt in without it being anything but a hindrance.  The Ayatollah would be more likely to crack down on protestors to spite the American government.  So if we REALLY care about the protestors, we need to just mind our own business.


 

tericared
by on Jun. 21, 2009 at 7:08 PM


Quoting Gypsyuma:

I don't know who REALLY won, but what I do know is that this country has no business sticking their nose in it.  Iran has to work out Iran's problems.

As for speaking out against abuse of protestors, given our past and current relationship with Iran, I still do not feel we are in a position to butt in without it being anything but a hindrance.  The Ayatollah would be more likely to crack down on protestors to spite the American government.  So if we REALLY care about the protestors, we need to just mind our own business.


I agree we are only doing harm if we get into their business.

Della529
by Matlock on Jun. 21, 2009 at 7:39 PM


Quoting tericared:
Quoting Gypsyuma:

I don't know who REALLY won, but what I do know is that this country has no business sticking their nose in it.  Iran has to work out Iran's problems.

As for speaking out against abuse of protestors, given our past and current relationship with Iran, I still do not feel we are in a position to butt in without it being anything but a hindrance.  The Ayatollah would be more likely to crack down on protestors to spite the American government.  So if we REALLY care about the protestors, we need to just mind our own business.


I agree we are only doing harm if we get into their business.

I posted this link in two other posts, but I will add it here too.  http://www.counterpunch.org/roberts06162009.html

Gypsyuma
by Gold Member on Jun. 22, 2009 at 11:28 AM

EXCELLENT article Della.  Sums up my thoughts EXACTLY.


 

blondekosmic15
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Yesterday at 9:49 PM
by on Jun. 22, 2009 at 11:32 AM

quote...

Ahmadinejad won;  get over it! Are you fond of him?

blondekosmic15
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I love the Fall. Chill in the air decorated w/ bronze leaves & holidays approaching~
Yesterday at 9:49 PM
by on Jun. 22, 2009 at 11:33 AM

 

Iranian Police Attack Hundreds of Opposition Protesters

Monday, June 22, 2009 

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,528063,00.html

Gypsyuma
by Gold Member on Jun. 22, 2009 at 12:58 PM

I am fond of him. SO?

Am I fond of what the Supreme Leader is doing to the protestors?  Hell no.

Do I think that our involvement will only make things worse for Iranians?  Hell ya.


 

muslimah
by on Jun. 22, 2009 at 1:07 PM


Quoting Gypsyuma:

I am fond of him. SO?

Am I fond of what the Supreme Leader is doing to the protestors?  Hell no.

Do I think that our involvement will only make things worse for Iranians?  Hell ya.

And once again, we have some things in common.

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