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Bottle-Feeding Moms Ignored by Medical Staff

Posted by on Jul. 16, 2009 at 9:07 AM
  • 56 Replies

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

 
Many feel pressured to breast-feed and ill-informed about alternative, researchers find.

woman bottlefeeding baby

Getty Images

HealthDay News: The lack of information and support for mothers who bottle-feed could put the health of their infants at risk, say British researchers who reviewed 23 studies that included more than 13,000 participants.

Most infants will receive some formula milk during their first year of life, even if their mothers have decided to breast-feed, said Dr. Rajalakshmi Lakshman and colleagues, from the University of Cambridge. Variations in bottle-feeding can have long-term health consequences for children, they noted.

Their review of published studies identified several common themes:

Some mothers who bottle-fed -- either because they couldn't breast-feed or because they prefer to bottle-feed -- experienced negative emotions such as guilt, worry about the impact on their baby, concern about health professionals' opinions, uncertainty about how to proceed, a sense of failure and anger at feeling pressure to breast-feed.

Some mothers said they didn't receive enough information on correct bottle-feeding techniques, which made it difficult to make decisions about whether they should bottle-feed and left them unsure about proper feeding frequencies and quantities.

It was common for mothers to make mistakes in bottle-feeding preparation. Incorrect preparation can increase the risk of infection, promote excessive weight gain or leave babies undernourished.

Some mothers who bottle-fed felt that hospital midwives spent far more time with breast-feeding mothers.

The findings appear online July 14 in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood.

It's important to promote breast-feeding because it's the healthiest option for both mother and baby, said the authors. But they added that it's "also necessary to ensure that the needs of bottle-feeding mothers are met ... Inadequate information and support for mothers who decide to bottle-feed may put the health of their babies at risk."

If health-care professionals don't provide correct information about bottle-feeding, mothers will seek help from family and friends, which may increase the risk of incorrect bottle-feeding practices being handed down, the researchers said.
 
 

 





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by on Jul. 16, 2009 at 9:07 AM
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Replies (1-10):
IhartU
by Gold Member on Jul. 16, 2009 at 9:21 AM

Funny, I was pressured to BOTTLE FEED by the medical staff. I was never even asked if I was going to breast feed and the nurse gave my daughter her first bottle without ASKING me.

Blueroses_78
by Member on Jul. 16, 2009 at 9:24 AM
When I had DS, I was so excited about breast feeding. Unfortunately, for some reason, I could not make enough milk (I would get only 1/8 of a cup total out of both breasts), so we had to also formula feed. I kept trying, but the pediatrician would come in and tell me that I was not trying hard enough and I needed to stop feeding him formula no matter what. My milk would come in eventually, she said. I kept thinking "what if it doesn't?" When I asked her that, she told me that it would, just trust her. Well, it did NOT come in at all. I dried up within 2 weeks of having him, and I never did figure out what caused it. But I plan on attempting to breast feed again with the one I have on the way, and if the same thing happens again, back to formula I go. It's better than starving an innocent baby.

As for these medical "professionals" who refuse to discuss bottle feeding, they need to get off their high horse and realize that they are putting more children at risk than helping.


babies
pregnancy
lilyrose73
by on Jul. 16, 2009 at 9:24 AM

 I don't understand why it's so difficult to support a mother no matter HOW she chooses to feed her child...

 

 

Champions find a way... Losers find an excuse

Raintree
by Ruby Member on Jul. 16, 2009 at 9:28 AM

Same here! Want us to take the baby and give him a bottle?? Huhhuhhuh??

NO!

Well, he could be hungry!

That's good, I said!

Yeah- I worked for three years- almost four, actually- on l&d and postpartum. I knew the l.c. nurses very well. They got yelled at on one side for not talking enough people into breastfeeding and on the patient side for, you know, asking if they were interested. I saw it personally several times (I did paperwork for birth certificates part of the time). Quiet little Julie would come in and say, 'I'm Julie from lactation, can I leave you a brochure?' and the patient would shout- 'Can't you people just READ the chart?? I'm NOT going to do that. Get out!'

And out she would creep.

Actually, Britain has a umm... not so great rate of breastfeeding.

Quoting IhartU:

Funny, I was pressured to BOTTLE FEED by the medical staff. I was never even asked if I was going to breast feed and the nurse gave my daughter her first bottle without ASKING me.


Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. - Michael Pollan

And while you're at it, remember that when you purchase food, you're voting with your dollar. Local farms, diversity, sustainability- all these should be positively answered by your vote. 


Raintree
by Ruby Member on Jul. 16, 2009 at 9:34 AM

Try to relax next time. That first time sounds pretty stressful. Also, were you pumping alot?

As for the medical profession, most of them still don't actively suggest breastfeeding. I know 24 OBs, somewhere around 48 L/D, postpartum, nursery and NICU nurses and only a handful advocate breastfeeding exclusively. Probably about 5 of all of those people. I heard their remarks/conversations, and read the charts of every patient every day to record orders. Our floor director often said there wasn't any difference between formula and breastmilk. The American Academy of Pediatrics is behind the World Health Organization in its recommendation on breastfeeding as well.

Anyway, it's a growing interest, but I've NEVER run into an OB or a nurse that goes breastfeeding nazi on a patient. Most of them don't give a hoot.

Quoting Blueroses_78:

When I had DS, I was so excited about breast feeding. Unfortunately, for some reason, I could not make enough milk (I would get only 1/8 of a cup total out of both breasts), so we had to also formula feed. I kept trying, but the pediatrician would come in and tell me that I was not trying hard enough and I needed to stop feeding him formula no matter what. My milk would come in eventually, she said. I kept thinking "what if it doesn't?" When I asked her that, she told me that it would, just trust her. Well, it did NOT come in at all. I dried up within 2 weeks of having him, and I never did figure out what caused it. But I plan on attempting to breast feed again with the one I have on the way, and if the same thing happens again, back to formula I go. It's better than starving an innocent baby.

As for these medical "professionals" who refuse to discuss bottle feeding, they need to get off their high horse and realize that they are putting more children at risk than helping.



Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. - Michael Pollan

And while you're at it, remember that when you purchase food, you're voting with your dollar. Local farms, diversity, sustainability- all these should be positively answered by your vote. 


Blueroses_78
by Member on Jul. 16, 2009 at 10:30 AM
Quoting Raintree:




The pediatrician was a female, and boy she is DEFINITELY a BF Nazi.

I was under a lot of stress. No one came to see me or my baby, no one bothered to call to see how I was doing. My then "husband" had to be forced to come see us. He wouldn't even stay with us. I was going through depression because of loneliness, and I had no one to talk to. I tried so hard, but it just didn't work out for me.

I agree that nurses and docs these days, at least in this country, for the most part encourage bottle feeding, but there are plenty who screech about BF only - no matter what, even if it means your baby goes hungry. It's upsetting, especially when you're trying your best and it just isn't good enough.

I think that women should be reading about the options LONG BEFORE they give birth, and make up their minds based on that research what their plan is for their child.


babies
pregnancy
Raintree
by Ruby Member on Jul. 16, 2009 at 10:51 AM

There are only, oh... 5 or 6 female OBs in my area. The rest are males. Surprisingly, the few I know that are the most encouraging of breastfeeding are men. Weirdness. The ladies could care less, seemingly. But anyway, probably not the point.

Yeah, try to relax as much as possible. Stress can and does inhibit milk production. And relying on pumping to build supply isn't technically the way to go. It'll work in the opposite direction.

You've got to hand it to the docs/nurses/hospitals that go out on a limb and encourage breastfeeding. Many receive a ot of pressure (money) from formula companies.

Quoting Blueroses_78:

Quoting Raintree:




The pediatrician was a female, and boy she is DEFINITELY a BF Nazi.

I was under a lot of stress. No one came to see me or my baby, no one bothered to call to see how I was doing. My then "husband" had to be forced to come see us. He wouldn't even stay with us. I was going through depression because of loneliness, and I had no one to talk to. I tried so hard, but it just didn't work out for me.

I agree that nurses and docs these days, at least in this country, for the most part encourage bottle feeding, but there are plenty who screech about BF only - no matter what, even if it means your baby goes hungry. It's upsetting, especially when you're trying your best and it just isn't good enough.

I think that women should be reading about the options LONG BEFORE they give birth, and make up their minds based on that research what their plan is for their child.



Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. - Michael Pollan

And while you're at it, remember that when you purchase food, you're voting with your dollar. Local farms, diversity, sustainability- all these should be positively answered by your vote. 


Stefanie1085
by Silver Member on Jul. 16, 2009 at 10:56 AM


Quoting Raintree:

There are only, oh... 5 or 6 female OBs in my area. The rest are males. Surprisingly, the few I know that are the most encouraging of breastfeeding are men. Weirdness. The ladies could care less, seemingly. But anyway, probably not the point.

Yeah, try to relax as much as possible. Stress can and does inhibit milk production. And relying on pumping to build supply isn't technically the way to go. It'll work in the opposite direction.

You've got to hand it to the docs/nurses/hospitals that go out on a limb and encourage breastfeeding. Many receive a ot of pressure (money) from formula companies.



I agree. When I volunteered in the nursery here, they had ALL kinds of formula stuff! They gave away diaper bags and such with simliac or enfamil advertising on them. I didn't noticed that they pressured into bf or ff. The lactation specialist just went in to help the bf moms. For the most part, the babies stayed in the rooms with the parents regardless.

ain-gell72
by on Jul. 16, 2009 at 10:58 AM

the part in red I must disagree with. I don't know about other formula companies, but with Abbott, the makers of Similac, they encourage bf. they even say on the wesite, and to their employees, that bf is a better way to feed, but they uphold their product to the best standards and regulations and care and consideration they can. Abbott is one of the most who gives the little diaper bags to new moms, coupons, free formula, free consult for bf options, etc.

yes- you could say I am biased, I ff and my dh works at Abbott! lol

Quoting Raintree:

There are only, oh... 5 or 6 female OBs in my area. The rest are males. Surprisingly, the few I know that are the most encouraging of breastfeeding are men. Weirdness. The ladies could care less, seemingly. But anyway, probably not the point.

Yeah, try to relax as much as possible. Stress can and does inhibit milk production. And relying on pumping to build supply isn't technically the way to go. It'll work in the opposite direction.

You've got to hand it to the docs/nurses/hospitals that go out on a limb and encourage breastfeeding. Many receive a ot of pressure (money) from formula companies.

Quoting Blueroses_78:

Quoting Raintree:




The pediatrician was a female, and boy she is DEFINITELY a BF Nazi.

I was under a lot of stress. No one came to see me or my baby, no one bothered to call to see how I was doing. My then "husband" had to be forced to come see us. He wouldn't even stay with us. I was going through depression because of loneliness, and I had no one to talk to. I tried so hard, but it just didn't work out for me.

I agree that nurses and docs these days, at least in this country, for the most part encourage bottle feeding, but there are plenty who screech about BF only - no matter what, even if it means your baby goes hungry. It's upsetting, especially when you're trying your best and it just isn't good enough.

I think that women should be reading about the options LONG BEFORE they give birth, and make up their minds based on that research what their plan is for their child.




Raintree
by Ruby Member on Jul. 16, 2009 at 11:24 AM

Regardless of whether a formula company states that breastmilk is better on the side of their product- they are still in the business of making money. If they are still marketing their product, they are still discouraging breastfeeding. And they also spend a lot of money encouraging formula feeding in countries that really do not have the ability to do it safely. The Philippines- for instance- has bought into this big time. My husband was born in Manilla and NONE of the women I know from the Philippines have the confidence to breastfeed past a couple weeks. They also believe that formula is either superior or just as good as breastmilk. They also claim to 'not make enough milk' (probably from the supplementary feedings).

I don't have a big issue with people formula feeding. If they have health issues or whatever- that's their choice. But until the makers of breastpumps or nutritional supplements for breastfeeding can afford to hand out freebies in the hospitals- I'd hardly say there was an equal playing field.

And of course- there isn't money in health.

I left the can of formula and all the literature every time I left the hospital.

Quoting ain-gell72:

the part in red I must disagree with. I don't know about other formula companies, but with Abbott, the makers of Similac, they encourage bf. they even say on the wesite, and to their employees, that bf is a better way to feed, but they uphold their product to the best standards and regulations and care and consideration they can. Abbott is one of the most who gives the little diaper bags to new moms, coupons, free formula, free consult for bf options, etc.

yes- you could say I am biased, I ff and my dh works at Abbott! lol

Quoting Raintree:

There are only, oh... 5 or 6 female OBs in my area. The rest are males. Surprisingly, the few I know that are the most encouraging of breastfeeding are men. Weirdness. The ladies could care less, seemingly. But anyway, probably not the point.

Yeah, try to relax as much as possible. Stress can and does inhibit milk production. And relying on pumping to build supply isn't technically the way to go. It'll work in the opposite direction.

You've got to hand it to the docs/nurses/hospitals that go out on a limb and encourage breastfeeding. Many receive a ot of pressure (money) from formula companies.

Quoting Blueroses_78:

Quoting Raintree:




The pediatrician was a female, and boy she is DEFINITELY a BF Nazi.

I was under a lot of stress. No one came to see me or my baby, no one bothered to call to see how I was doing. My then "husband" had to be forced to come see us. He wouldn't even stay with us. I was going through depression because of loneliness, and I had no one to talk to. I tried so hard, but it just didn't work out for me.

I agree that nurses and docs these days, at least in this country, for the most part encourage bottle feeding, but there are plenty who screech about BF only - no matter what, even if it means your baby goes hungry. It's upsetting, especially when you're trying your best and it just isn't good enough.

I think that women should be reading about the options LONG BEFORE they give birth, and make up their minds based on that research what their plan is for their child.





Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. - Michael Pollan

And while you're at it, remember that when you purchase food, you're voting with your dollar. Local farms, diversity, sustainability- all these should be positively answered by your vote. 


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You must be a member to reply to this post.
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