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So the gov failed. Let's tell them how to fix our health care system

Posted by on Aug. 12, 2009 at 6:57 PM
  • 26 Replies

Okay, so I think the majority of people are not satisfiedwith our current health care system.  A reform is needed.
The government ispulling the wool over our eyes by trying to push through a bill with so many ammendments and articles that no one has had a chance to truly understand what they are voting for.

So, let's be proactive!  Instead of sitting around pissing and moaning about left and right BS,  let's tell the government how to do their job.  We are a group of -mostly- intelligent women.  Let's put ittopractice.  

Let's find ways that we can lower the cost of health care.  Post ideas and research with monetary amounts that would be saved.   I think this will be fun, educational, and quite eye opening for everyone!


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by on Aug. 12, 2009 at 6:57 PM
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Replies (1-10):
MattisMommy08
by Bronze Member on Aug. 12, 2009 at 7:01 PM

I say we cap malpractice suits.  It will save tons of money  (I remember reading $500 bil, but I will find the study) in unnecessary tests and procedures done by doctors who fear a malpractice suit.  This will also save doctors money because their insurance will not need to be so high.
Let me go find my studies to validate =)   I have them bookmarked somewhere:

 

$700 billion spent on unnecessary medical procedures.  Two main reasons: 1, to avoid a malpractice suit. 2, for monetray gain.  So, let's change the dr.s pay to salary, not on a fee-for-service- basis.
http://healthcare-economist.com/2008/11/07/us-spends-700-billion-on-unnecessary-medical-tests/


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Raintree
by Ruby Member on Aug. 12, 2009 at 7:37 PM

Prevention.

Everyone should drop their insurance coverage. I have a feeling that that would accomplish something. Quickly.

Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. - Michael Pollan

And while you're at it, remember that when you purchase food, you're voting with your dollar. Local farms, diversity, sustainability- all these should be positively answered by your vote. 


MattisMommy08
by Bronze Member on Aug. 12, 2009 at 7:40 PM

Let's stick a border patrol agent in every hospital.  No legal proof of citizenship, no healthcare.


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katy_kay
by on Aug. 12, 2009 at 7:49 PM

The health care debate is JUST getting started.  NOBODY has said it was going to be an instant fix so no the government hasn't failed, they are just getting started.   

Obama has made it clear this is process that will take years as steps are taken towards a program that will provide access to health care for all Americans. 

Now if you want to discuss what people would like to see in a program GREAT, but if you are going to use this topic as a platform to jump off into an anti immigration rant then why bother talking to your closed mind. 

conniecabe
by on Aug. 12, 2009 at 7:53 PM


Quoting MattisMommy08:

Let's stick a border patrol agent in every hospital.  No legal proof of citizenship, no healthcare.


How do we prove we're citizens? Can't illegals get drivers licenses (not being snarky, I'm genuinely not sure if they can or can't).  If they can obtain a DL, would that mean we'd have to carry our birth certificates around with us?   Or do you favor some sort of national id system?

Raintree
by Ruby Member on Aug. 12, 2009 at 7:59 PM

Ah yes, the national id question. I'd like to know about this, too...

Quoting conniecabe:


Quoting MattisMommy08:

Let's stick a border patrol agent in every hospital.  No legal proof of citizenship, no healthcare.


How do we prove we're citizens? Can't illegals get drivers licenses (not being snarky, I'm genuinely not sure if they can or can't).  If they can obtain a DL, would that mean we'd have to carry our birth certificates around with us?   Or do you favor some sort of national id system?


Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. - Michael Pollan

And while you're at it, remember that when you purchase food, you're voting with your dollar. Local farms, diversity, sustainability- all these should be positively answered by your vote. 


katy_kay
by on Aug. 12, 2009 at 8:00 PM


Quoting conniecabe:

 

Quoting MattisMommy08:

Let's stick a border patrol agent in every hospital.  No legal proof of citizenship, no healthcare.


How do we prove we're citizens? Can't illegals get drivers licenses (not being snarky, I'm genuinely not sure if they can or can't).  If they can obtain a DL, would that mean we'd have to carry our birth certificates around with us?   Or do you favor some sort of national id system?

Good question...my guess is the OP supports a National ID plan.  For those that claim they want LESS government involvement they sure seem to want to turn the US into a Police State. 

lilyrose73
by on Aug. 12, 2009 at 8:06 PM

If Congress is serious about controlling the high costs of health care, there needs to be some sort of Tort reform in this bill... which probably won't happen because a lot of our Congressmen and Senators are lawyers. 

Champions find a way... Losers find an excuse

conniecabe
by on Aug. 12, 2009 at 8:08 PM


Quoting MattisMommy08:

I say we cap malpractice suits.  It will save tons of money  (I remember reading $500 bil, but I will find the study) in unnecessary tests and procedures done by doctors who fear a malpractice suit.  This will also save doctors money because their insurance will not need to be so high.
Let me go find my studies to validate =)   I have them bookmarked somewhere:

 

$700 billion spent on unnecessary medical procedures.  Two main reasons: 1, to avoid a malpractice suit. 2, for monetray gain.  So, let's change the dr.s pay to salary, not on a fee-for-service- basis.
http://healthcare-economist.com/2008/11/07/us-spends-700-billion-on-unnecessary-medical-tests/

I think this is a good start.  However, our soaring health care costs can not be blamed on malpractice lawsuits.  Let's say Joe Smith has the wrong leg amputated and is now a bilateral amputee for no reason other than negligence. How do we justify capping that award?  Here's an article from 2007.  The answer is making medicine safer, not capping lawsuits. Which, coincidentally, HR 3200 is supposed to be addressing. (See items in blue below).

Oddly enough, the thing that's bankrupting doctors isn't malpractice lawsuits, but wait for it....malpractice INSURANCE!  Imagine that? 

WASHINGTON, D.C. –The new report, “The Great Medical Malpractice Hoax,” dispels oft-repeated myths of dwindling doctors and spiraling insurance premiums used to support limits on the ability of injured patients to seek redress in the courts.

The real problems are a lack of attention to patient safety, the high incidence of preventable medical error and the lack of accountability for a small set of doctors who account for a majority of medical malpractice payments, the report reveals. The report also presents several recommendations for Congress, state governments and hospitals to reduce health care costs and save lives.

Public Citizen reviewed publicly available information from 1990 to 2005 from the federal government’s National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB), which contains data on malpractice payments made on behalf of doctors as well as disciplinary actions taken against them by state medical boards or hospitals. According to the analysis, the total number of malpractice payments paid on behalf of doctors, with judgments and settlements, declined 15.4 percent between 1991 and 2005, and the number of payments per 100,000 people in the country declined more than 10 percent. In addition, the average payment for a medical malpractice verdict, adjusted for inflation, dropped eight percent in the same period.

The numbers show that patients do not win large jury awards for less serious claims but that payments usually correspond to the severity of injury.  In 2005, less than three percent of all payments were for million-dollar verdicts and more than 64 percent of payments involved death or significant injury – while less than one-third of one percent were for “insignificant injury.”

“Despite assertions by the medical and business lobbies that physicians are leaving practice because of burdensome malpractice lawsuits, the number of doctors is increasing faster than the population,” said Laura MacCleery, director of Public Citizen’s Congress Watch group. “In recent years, medical malpractice insurers have been reaping huge profits, not paying out excessive jury awards. The false claims of a malpractice lawsuit crisis are really about putting profits ahead of patients. They distract from real health care reform designed to improve patient safety, enhance efficiency and cut costs.”

Public Citizen’s analysis indicates that to limit preventable patient deaths and injury and rising health care costs, reforms should reduce medical errors and tighten lax doctor discipline and oversight.

To improve patient safety and prevent errors, Congress should establish a national mandatory adverse event reporting system so that hospitals share information that can help them correct faulty systems and practices. To combat medication errors, hospitals should invest in computer physician order entry systems. This would avoid mistakes associated with illegible handwriting and automatically check for errors or bad drug interactions. Despite a 2006 study by the Institute of Medicine concluding that medication error is one of the most common preventable mistakes and costs as much as $3.5 billion annually, fewer than five percent of hospitals have implemented such a system. Hospitals and medical practices should also limit physicians’ workweeks to reduce fatigue-induced error.

Improving physician oversight is vital to addressing the small percentage of repeat offenders who continue to practice despite being responsible for a majority of malpractice claims in America. The report documents that just 5.9 percent of doctors have been responsible for 57.8 percent of the number of malpractice payments from 1991 to 2005, with each of these doctors making at least two payments. The vast majority of doctors – 82 percent – have never had a medical malpractice payment since the NPDB was created in 1990. State medical boards, which are largely responsible for doctor discipline, should be given greater funding and staffing, and be required to provide stricter oversight to prevent dangerous doctors from practicing in their own or other states.

Greater disclosure of offenders would also provide consumers with the information necessary to make informed decisions about their health care. Congress should lift the veil of secrecy on the national database by allowing the public access to the names of doctors – which are now kept secret – and state legislatures should require state medical boards to improve their Web sites to provide better quality and accessibility of information about doctor discipline.

To read the report, click here.

 

Raintree
by Ruby Member on Aug. 12, 2009 at 8:13 PM

The thing about the lawsuit capping stuff is that it places ALL of the restriction on THE VICTIM.

That's not anywhere close to fair. Or right.

Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. - Michael Pollan

And while you're at it, remember that when you purchase food, you're voting with your dollar. Local farms, diversity, sustainability- all these should be positively answered by your vote. 


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