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Boy Scouts / Girl Scouts

Posted by on Aug. 21, 2009 at 8:41 PM
  • 8 Replies

Disclaimer: I admit this may just be my area as I have not personally researched where or not it is this way all over but from the brochures it seems that it is.


Why has the boy and girl scouts suddenly turned into this excuse for family togetherness and seemingly have lost all of the things that made them great when I was a child?

My husband took my son to the join night for the local boy scouts(all I am saying applies to the girl scout program as well) and of course when he came back we discussed if he felt my son was going to enjoy the troop and what they would be doing. He comes in with these sheet on how they are not a baby sitter and parents must accompany their children to all events and the parents are expected to do "dangerous" badge work for the child.They only go during school, and it has become more of a value extension to school rather than what my husband and I cherish from our childhoods in both these organizations.

I have nothing against family togetherness but to me the point of being a scout is to learn how to act on your own in a group setting separate from parents along side peers. I had to earn all my badges on my own short of the raft badge or others which require teamwork. Short of the endless supply of frivolous lawsuits (I have not seen any against these organizations) why are they turning this into some lack luster mundane way to force family?

Yes, my opinion is a bit strong but good grief it seems we are trying to turn the generation of tomorrow into complete dependants.


by on Aug. 21, 2009 at 8:41 PM
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Replies (1-8):
mamadixon
by Gold Member on Aug. 21, 2009 at 8:52 PM

I was so excited for my kids to join scouts....There is what you have mentioned for sure,but the biggest thing that did it for me was the almost vulgar amount of emphasis placed upon selling cookies/popcorn. I remember selling cookies, but it was a short time with no pressure to produce.Not so now.

We decided against scouts.

stormcris
by Christy on Aug. 21, 2009 at 8:59 PM

I remember selling cookies as a child and it is so far different than now. Selling cookies then I had to do and it was a sense of accomplishment, sure my parents introduced me to the people I sold to but it was for me to go up and ask. I thought that was the point of cookie selling to teach children to interact with different people and to raise money for the troup. Now I see these huge competitions of parents setting up selling points all over town and it is all about the parents. I have yet to see a kid do any selling. Its sad because that was a good experience for me.

Quoting mamadixon:

I was so excited for my kids to join scouts....There is what you have mentioned for sure,but the biggest thing that did it for me was the almost vulgar amount of emphasis placed upon selling cookies/popcorn. I remember selling cookies, but it was a short time with no pressure to produce.Not so now.

We decided against scouts.


Lizardannie1966
by on Aug. 21, 2009 at 9:52 PM

With our two daughters, we've had a total of three bad Girl Scouts experiences, and it was solely about the troop leaders. With our oldest daughter, the troop leader just didn't try or not as I remember a troop leader doing. "Do 10 push-ups, and there's a badge." "Color a page out of the coloring book, and there's another badge." She didn't challenge the kids and cookies? She apparently hadn't handed in some sort of required paperwork on time, and their troop couldn't sell the cookies that year. I just honestly do not think her heart was in it.

With our youngest daughter, she has had two bad experiences, as well. One troop leader in particular got VERY upset with me as she was a teacher at the school where they met for meetings (and the same school our youngest Dd attended) and I happened to have mentioned what was bothering our youngest daughter to her own school teacher. The problem had to do with the GS meeting the day before and our daughter's teacher had called, asking what was going on. Word evidently got back to the GS troop leader, and I was given a reprimand by the troop leader. We'd walk in to pick up our daughter from meetings, and the only thing she had done the entire time was color in coloring books. When I finally asked what else they were going to do, I was told (and rather rudely) by the assistant leader, "Well..we're teachers and we're only volunteering to do this." Then why the heck did they bother volunteering?

I've given our youngest Dd the opportunity to try another troop and she says she'll "think about it." I don't blame her.

From our experiences, it's changed a lot and I'm not sure of what type of screening is done for the volunteer leaders, but something needs to change. At least in OUR district here and from what WE have seen.


 

Quoting stormcris:

Disclaimer: I admit this may just be my area as I have not personally researched where or not it is this way all over but from the brochures it seems that it is.

 

Why has the boy and girl scouts suddenly turned into this excuse for family togetherness and seemingly have lost all of the things that made them great when I was a child?

I have nothing against family togetherness but to me the point of being a scout is to learn how to act on your own in a group setting separate from parents along side peers. I had to earn all my badges on my own short of the raft badge or others which require teamwork. Short of the endless supply of frivolous lawsuits (I have not seen any against these organizations) why are they turning this into some lack luster mundane way to force family?


BlueDolphins3
by Member on Aug. 22, 2009 at 8:03 AM

Boy Scouts are very different from Girl Scouts. During Girl Scouts parents are not required to stay during meetings. Selling cookies are not a requirement neither. Parents can CHOOSE to be volunteers and help during meetings/events. I'm sorry some of you have had less than pleasant Girl Scout experiences but if you ever have a problem with Girl Scouts in the future you could contact you local Girl Scout Council. If that does not help you can contact Girl Scouts of the USA directly. They would not allow a poor leader to continue to operate a troop. Leaders have been removed from troops in the past because of poor performance. Girl Scout leaders are trained and are held to a high standard.  Do report when you have concerns on the quality of the Girl Scout experience your daughter is receiving.

conniecabe
by on Aug. 22, 2009 at 10:03 AM

My  almost 11 year old daughter has a fantastic girl scout leader. We are very fortunate as I think she's a rare breed of leader. Kiley has been a part of this troop for 5 years.  Yes, there is a ton of emphasis placed on selling cookies. But, every year, our girls get to do something great with their earnings.  In addition to it paying their membership fee and dues, they also go on a trip.  This year they are going to San Diego to surf camp.

Parents aren't made to feel guilty if they can't volunteer.  My work schedule makes volunteering difficult, so I rarely volunteer my time except during cookie season. Really, this group of 8 girls gets together at the leaders house about every 4-6 weeks (Thank Goodness, it's not every 2 weeks!) and the parents leave. The girls decide on their next charity (usually operation stocking stuffer) and their next fun event.  The troop is as active as the girls want to be.  I think that's the best part.  They run the show. 

 I should point out it's not all fun and games either.  Once a year, Intel hosts a talent show to raise monies for a charity.  Last years charity was the House of Refuge.  The House of Refuge is a community center for families that are fleeing abusive souses/parents.  The kids that spend time there range in age from 4-17.  The kids from the house of refuge wanted to perform at the talent show as a way to say thank you for helping them out.  My daughter and another girl from the troop volunteered their time to help choreograph and teach this group of kids a dance to High School Musical.  I have to tell you, I cried when the kids finished their dance.  They did an amazing job and their faces lit up when the crowd gave them a standing ovation.  I was so happy that my daughter got to experience that.  It's not something she would have been involved with otherwise.  They did earn a bronze award for their efforts...which is the highest award a Junior scout can earn. 

 If my girl scout troop had been like this as a kid, I'd probably lasted longer than I did.  All we did was bake sales.  ;)

stormcris
by Christy on Aug. 22, 2009 at 1:58 PM

Hi Blue, thanks for letting us know this. When in the OP I say it applies to girl scouts as well I mean that the girl scout program here operates that way. Once again thanks for the information on who to contact.

Quoting BlueDolphins3:

Boy Scouts are very different from Girl Scouts. During Girl Scouts parents are not required to stay during meetings. Selling cookies are not a requirement neither. Parents can CHOOSE to be volunteers and help during meetings/events. I'm sorry some of you have had less than pleasant Girl Scout experiences but if you ever have a problem with Girl Scouts in the future you could contact you local Girl Scout Council. If that does not help you can contact Girl Scouts of the USA directly. They would not allow a poor leader to continue to operate a troop. Leaders have been removed from troops in the past because of poor performance. Girl Scout leaders are trained and are held to a high standard.  Do report when you have concerns on the quality of the Girl Scout experience your daughter is receiving.


momandvet
by on Aug. 22, 2009 at 2:09 PM

The boy scouts does not belong in the same category as the girl scouts.

The girl scouts do not discriminate and they are moving more towards teaching girls to be strong independent women. 

The boy scouts discriminate against atheist and homosexuals.  They should not be supported.  It is like Hitlers youth for Christians.

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stormcris
by Christy on Aug. 22, 2009 at 2:15 PM

It is completely for the way they operate in my particular town that they are placed together for the actions mentioned above.

Quoting momandvet:

The boy scouts does not belong in the same category as the girl scouts.

The girl scouts do not discriminate and they are moving more towards teaching girls to be strong independent women. 

The boy scouts discriminate against atheist and homosexuals.  They should not be supported.  It is like Hitlers youth for Christians.


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