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Christian Bibles used for ART... Seen as POOR TASTE...

Posted by on Aug. 21, 2009 at 9:32 PM
  • 12 Replies

LONDON -- A controversial art exhibit in Glasgow, Scotland, is causing a stir among Christians in the United Kingdom.

The display encouraged visitors to "write themselves back into the Bible," leading to what many called offensive remarks written on the pages.

It's part of an exhibit entitled "Made in God's Image" and was devised by a minister from a church that reaches out to gays and lesbians.

Art gallery visitors were urged to write on the pages of the Bible and express their feelings if they felt they had been excluded from it.

On the first page of the book of Genesis, one woman wrote, " I am bi, female and proud. I want no god who is disappointed in this." Another wrote the Bible is "the biggest lie in human history."

Others called God a fascist and included obscenities.

Earlier this summer, members of the Zion Baptist Church peacefully protested the defacing of the Bible displayed at the Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art.

More than 100 people gathered outside the gallery to protest what they claimed was an act of vandalism, but for the most part, the church in the U.K. has been silent.

Unlike the Pakistan incident, there was no violence there, no murder or mayhem or uncontrolled anger.

However, the Evangelical Alliance's Justin Thacker says gallery curators did receive some rude and offensive e-mails.

"There's no place for that whatsoever," he said. "Now there is a place, a rightful place for Christians to standup and say this is what we believe and we don't think you should scandalize the Bible in this way or deliberately seek to offend Christians in this way.

"But we ourselves must ensure the way we make those points is gracious and not offensive in itself," Thacker added.

Most of the outrage over the defaced Bible was muted.

The Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art responded to the protests by placing the Bible under a glass case.

Instead of writing on the pages of the Bible, visitors were urged to write comments on sheets of paper provided along side it.

"A compromise solution has been found," Thacker said. "The Bible is still on display, people can still write comments, but the really offensive, the really rude ones, will now be kind of weeded out and I think that is the right response."

The controversial exhibit came at a time when a recent report found that Bible knowledge in the U.K. is declining.

Only one in 10 Brits can name all of the Ten Commandments and young people say they view the Bible as "old fashioned."

Some believe the U.K. is losing its Christian heritage, while making concessions to the Islamic faith and the growing number of Muslim immigrants who live there.

One official with the Catholic Church said he wondered if the museum and Bible exhibit organizers would have been so willing to have the Koran defaced.

by on Aug. 21, 2009 at 9:32 PM
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Replies (1-10):
rocklovinggirl
by Bronze Member on Aug. 21, 2009 at 11:11 PM

I am not sure what to say here...but very interesting. I will have to think this over... I don't really know if this bothers me or not and I am a Christian!


Soon to be BFing, selective vaxing, cloth diapering and baby wearing momma to Josiah! Loves World of Warcraft, scrapbooking, reading, rock music, tattoos, the color pink and the Vampire Lestat! TX born and raised, open minded, Ron Paul supporting Libertarian, loving Army wife and most importantly Christian!
Raintree
by Ruby Member on Aug. 21, 2009 at 11:13 PM

Well, people are free to do what they want with religious books. Any religious book.

The liberal person shall be enriched, and he who waters shall himself be watered. Proverbs 11:25

rozepyle
by on Aug. 21, 2009 at 11:14 PM

i am in no way religious, i was born a roman catholic raised in a conservative jewish family and adopted out as a buddhist now i am.... me?


but i do fancy some good religious art work ( i have a couple pieces), i see nothing wrong with this it is simply expression and people are free to express as they please

Scorpio359
by on Aug. 22, 2009 at 2:27 AM

You never deface the Bible. I do wonder what would happen if this were the Koran. Interesting.

blondekosmic15
by on Aug. 22, 2009 at 2:51 AM


Quoting Scorpio359:

You never deface the Bible. I do wonder what would happen if this were the Koran. Interesting.


Agree.....

MissBearNMonkey
by on Aug. 22, 2009 at 8:55 AM

The exact same thing that is happening with the Bible: those who believe it is a sacred text will be deeply offended and post threads about  it on line. I'd even bet that some would say, "They wouldn't dare do this to a Bible."

Quoting blondekosmic15:

 

Quoting Scorpio359:

You never deface the Bible. I do wonder what would happen if this were the Koran. Interesting.


Agree.....


PurdueMom
by Sherri on Aug. 22, 2009 at 9:24 AM


Quoting Scorpio359:

You never deface the Bible. I do wonder what would happen if this were the Koran. Interesting.

I'm curious... do you know what the Koran says about homosexuality?  I'm now wondering, also, how Muslims treat other Muslims who are gay. 

Hmmm... I'm off to research!

Sherri
SillyJessi
by on Aug. 22, 2009 at 11:16 AM

Seems to me this could be the first/only time some folks have actually "talked to God" - in a way that's pretty cool right?  I mean, not everyone has Good things to say to God the first time they pray.  I wouldn't think discouraging them would be the answer.  I mean, if God is Real and True and all Loving and Understanding, etc., then how would prayers or even curses, scrawled into a book, really hurt Him?  Wouldn't it be seen as a direct and sincere attempt at communicating?  Isn't that sort of the goal?


Quote:



Instead of writing on the pages of the Bible, visitors were urged to write comments on sheets of paper provided along side it.

"A compromise solution has been found," Thacker said. "The Bible is still on display, people can still write comments, but the really offensive, the really rude ones, will now be kind of weeded out and I think that is the right response."



Who is it, that decides what's "really offensive, really rude"?  I mean I understand, if someone really wants to call God whatever they feel they should do it in the privacy of their own prayer and not one on display, and this is just "art" but sheesh...  seems awful tenderfooted all around.  Catering to sensitivity of the humans, not the God or even the art...



Blech, whatever.


it just rings silly and affected to me.  "Much ado about nothing".  And yet, I managed to waste my time thinking about it and elaborating on it.  Silly me.

rocklovinggirl
by Bronze Member on Aug. 22, 2009 at 11:25 AM


Quoting PurdueMom:


Quoting Scorpio359:

You never deface the Bible. I do wonder what would happen if this were the Koran. Interesting.

I'm curious... do you know what the Koran says about homosexuality?  I'm now wondering, also, how Muslims treat other Muslims who are gay. 

Hmmm... I'm off to research!


I would love to know this, too!


Soon to be BFing, selective vaxing, cloth diapering and baby wearing momma to Josiah! Loves World of Warcraft, scrapbooking, reading, rock music, tattoos, the color pink and the Vampire Lestat! TX born and raised, open minded, Ron Paul supporting Libertarian, loving Army wife and most importantly Christian!
Friday
by HRH of MJ on Aug. 22, 2009 at 11:35 AM

Poor taste? Perhaps, I would never disrespect ANY religious text even though I don't believe in any of them.

Free Speech is a beautiful thing. 

 


Thank God......it's Friday!!!

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