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 I have seen a couple of comments, over the past couple of weeks, that truly baffle me. There are really still people here in America that believe that education is NOT a right, and that there should NOT be public education? If so, please tell me why.

http://gmoerch.avonrepresentative.com/
A pond am I, not deep, not shallow.
by on Aug. 24, 2009 at 11:00 AM
Replies (11-20):
Stefanie1085
by Silver Member on Aug. 24, 2009 at 2:00 PM


Quoting norwegianwood:

Well, let's turn that around. Can you point to the part of the Constitution that makes it a RIGHT?

P 

I have the right to vote for representation who agrees that we need public school so that everyone can get an education and will vote for laws that instill this.

norwegianwood
by Platinum Member on Aug. 24, 2009 at 2:07 PM


Quoting Stefanie1085:


Quoting norwegianwood:

Well, let's turn that around. Can you point to the part of the Constitution that makes it a RIGHT?

P 

I have the right to vote for representation who agrees that we need public school so that everyone can get an education and will vote for laws that instill this.

That wasn't what you asked..YOU stated you thought education was a right. Please first define what constitutes a RIGHT, and then explain exactly HOW it is so by using the Constitution to do so.

And, IF we operated as we SHOULD be from the founding, no...nobody who doesn't KNOW that education is NOT a right would not have the PRIVILEGE--it's not a right, rights cannot be legally taken away from you--to vote. No ma'am.

P

P

Stefanie1085
by Silver Member on Aug. 24, 2009 at 2:08 PM


Quoting norwegianwood:


Quoting Stefanie1085:


Quoting norwegianwood:

Well, let's turn that around. Can you point to the part of the Constitution that makes it a RIGHT?

P 

I have the right to vote for representation who agrees that we need public school so that everyone can get an education and will vote for laws that instill this.

That wasn't what you asked..YOU stated you thought education was a right. Please first define what constitutes a RIGHT, and then explain exactly HOW it is so by using the Constitution to do so.

And, IF we operated as we SHOULD be from the founding, no...nobody who doesn't KNOW that education is NOT a right would not have the PRIVILEGE--it's not a right, rights cannot be legally taken away from you--to vote. No ma'am.

P

P

I never said it was a right. I said it was important.

Gypsyuma
by Gold Member on Aug. 24, 2009 at 5:20 PM

According to Wikepedia:

Not all legal rights of citizens of the United States derive from the United States Constitution. Legal rights of U.S. citizens and U.S. entities also derive from state constitutions, statute, common law, and contracts.

Human rights refer to the "basic rights and freedoms to which all humans are entitled."[1] Examples of rights and freedoms which have come to be commonly thought of as human rights include civil and political rights, such as the right to life and liberty, freedom of expression, and equality before the law; and economic, social and cultural rights, including the right to participate in culture, the right to food, the right to work, and the right to education.

I really like this saying alot:

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

—Article 1 of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)[2]

I wonder if those who dimiss the rights to education and healthcare actually understand the concept of "brotherhood". 

  Maryam

Gretchen2876
by Silver Member on Aug. 24, 2009 at 7:04 PM

 The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

Does this answer your question? BTW, I would really love to know what has happened to all of my posts. 

mccainiac
by on Aug. 24, 2009 at 7:27 PM


Quoting Stefanie1085:

 

I believe the reason our public education system is failing is because of the lack of parent involvement. We should be supplementing. We as parents should be encouraging them to learn and show interest and discipline in teaching them. I think public school is very important.


Well said!!!Parents mistake teachers for babysitters.Then when little Johnny is failing,it's somebody elses fault.

AMom29
by Gold Member on Aug. 25, 2009 at 1:37 PM


Quoting PamR:

I wonder what happens to a country, as a whole, when there is no public education system in place - who benefits from having a poorly educated populace?  Public education in this country has a lot of problems that need to be addressed, but throwing it out isn't the solution.  Of course, in the richest nation in the world, education is a right that everyone should have.

Who benefits?  Those in power (I don't mean dems vs. repubs, I mean in general) -- or those who think they have power.

I am reminded of the Middle Ages, where the leaders kept the "peasants" from learning how to read the ancient texts, so that those in power could interpret the laws any way they wanted without fear of reprisal.

hkowalski
by New Member on Aug. 25, 2009 at 1:44 PM


Quoting norwegianwood:

Well, let's turn that around. Can you point to the part of the Constitution that makes it a RIGHT?

P 

Let me answer your question with another question.....Correct me if I am wrong but does it not seem funny that the constitution says you have the right to bare arms but not an education? The constitution should not be the "Say all"

H.

Stefanie1085
by Silver Member on Aug. 25, 2009 at 1:48 PM


Quoting hkowalski:

 

Quoting norwegianwood:

Well, let's turn that around. Can you point to the part of the Constitution that makes it a RIGHT?

P 

Let me answer your question with another question.....Correct me if I am wrong but does it not seem funny that the constitution says you have the right to bare arms but not an education? The constitution should not be the "Say all"

H.

That's why the constitution says this as Grethen pointed out in another post:

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

hkowalski
by New Member on Aug. 25, 2009 at 1:49 PM


Quoting Gypsyuma:

According to Wikepedia:

Not all legal rights of citizens of the United States derive from the United States Constitution. Legal rights of U.S. citizens and U.S. entities also derive from state constitutions, statute, common law, and contracts.

Human rights refer to the "basic rights and freedoms to which all humans are entitled."[1] Examples of rights and freedoms which have come to be commonly thought of as human rights include civil and political rights, such as the right to life and liberty, freedom of expression, and equality before the law; and economic, social and cultural rights, including the right to participate in culture, the right to food, the right to work, and the right to education.

I really like this saying alot:


All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

—Article 1 of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)[2]

I wonder if those who dimiss the rights to education and healthcare actually understand the concept of "brotherhood". 

Your last comment is outstanding. I totally agree...why are more people not thinking like this.

 H

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