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Why Primarys are fed up.

Posted by on Aug. 25, 2009 at 8:09 AM
  • 4 Replies

Makes you wonder, but then again most that are becoming Drs. are chooseing "specialties" and not General Pratice or Family medical.

http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/08/25/harris.primary.care.doctor/index.html

by on Aug. 25, 2009 at 8:09 AM
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mamapotter
by Member on Aug. 25, 2009 at 8:17 AM

When we relocated and I had to find a new primary care doctor, I was actually turned down by several on the grounds that my medical history was too complicated.  They all directed me to the state college teaching hospital where a large group with bunch of med students would treat me.  The advantage of this was also that in such a large practice like that, in a hospital, nobody would catch any grief for ordering expensive tests and treatments for me.

Dr. Phil said that the secret to inner peace was to finish everything you started.  So I looked around the house, finished the book I wanted to read, my old Prozac prescription, the rest of the cheesecake, and a bottle of Jack Daniels.  You wouldn't believe how calm I am now.
mamaof2angles
by on Aug. 25, 2009 at 8:19 AM

Not all of us have that luxuary though. For my daughters medical needs I have to travel out of town and out of state to see the doctors that she needs, I cant even take her the so-called hosptial here in town because they dont know how to handle REAL medical cases.

Quoting mamapotter:

When we relocated and I had to find a new primary care doctor, I was actually turned down by several on the grounds that my medical history was too complicated.  They all directed me to the state college teaching hospital where a large group with bunch of med students would treat me.  The advantage of this was also that in such a large practice like that, in a hospital, nobody would catch any grief for ordering expensive tests and treatments for me.


mamapotter
by Member on Aug. 25, 2009 at 8:24 AM

Oh I was being sarcastic whhen I said it was an advantage.  I have to travel 45 minutes to my PCP and I see him at least once every 60 days.

We used to live in WV, and there is a big problem there with malpractice insurance being so high.  It has forced a lot of doctors to leave the state.  It's gotten to the point where the only way to see a specialist (especially for a child) was to go to WVU's hospital in Morgantown.  That was several hours away for me.  I had to take my daughter there because it was the only pediatric urologist in-state.

Quoting mamaof2angles:

Not all of us have that luxuary though. For my daughters medical needs I have to travel out of town and out of state to see the doctors that she needs, I cant even take her the so-called hosptial here in town because they dont know how to handle REAL medical cases.

Quoting mamapotter:

When we relocated and I had to find a new primary care doctor, I was actually turned down by several on the grounds that my medical history was too complicated.  They all directed me to the state college teaching hospital where a large group with bunch of med students would treat me.  The advantage of this was also that in such a large practice like that, in a hospital, nobody would catch any grief for ordering expensive tests and treatments for me.

 


Dr. Phil said that the secret to inner peace was to finish everything you started.  So I looked around the house, finished the book I wanted to read, my old Prozac prescription, the rest of the cheesecake, and a bottle of Jack Daniels.  You wouldn't believe how calm I am now.
mamaof2angles
by on Aug. 25, 2009 at 8:28 AM

45 mintues??? thats it???  surprised   damn you got it easy, I have to travel 1hour and 45 minutes north to Great Falls for nureosurgon, 2 hours west for Urology, and 6+ hours (mind you all this depends on weather) west for Orthopeditics.  Yes the 2 closest ER's are 1hour and 45 mintues north and 2 hours west. All because the "so-called" hosptial here does not know anything about SB or what not.

Quoting mamapotter:

Oh I was being sarcastic whhen I said it was an advantage.  I have to travel 45 minutes to my PCP and I see him at least once every 60 days.

We used to live in WV, and there is a big problem there with malpractice insurance being so high.  It has forced a lot of doctors to leave the state.  It's gotten to the point where the only way to see a specialist (especially for a child) was to go to WVU's hospital in Morgantown.  That was several hours away for me.  I had to take my daughter there because it was the only pediatric urologist in-state.

Quoting mamaof2angles:

Not all of us have that luxuary though. For my daughters medical needs I have to travel out of town and out of state to see the doctors that she needs, I cant even take her the so-called hosptial here in town because they dont know how to handle REAL medical cases.

Quoting mamapotter:

When we relocated and I had to find a new primary care doctor, I was actually turned down by several on the grounds that my medical history was too complicated.  They all directed me to the state college teaching hospital where a large group with bunch of med students would treat me.  The advantage of this was also that in such a large practice like that, in a hospital, nobody would catch any grief for ordering expensive tests and treatments for me.

 

 


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