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Hot Topic (9/7): Should teenagers be able to get birth control without parental permission?

Posted by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 2:52 AM
  • 47 Replies

 AUSTIN – Texas, a leader in teen pregnancy and the state where more teens give birth to subsequent children than in any other, maintains one of the most restrictive policies in the nation for minors to obtain prescription birth control.

Not even young parents in Texas can get birth control without their own parents' permission at nearly a third of the family planning clinics on contract with the state health department.

While most privately and publicly funded clinics in North Texas prescribe contraceptives without insisting that parents be notified, all 10 school-based clinics run by Parkland Health & Hospital System in Dallas must have a parent's signed consent. One in Carrollton-Farmers Branch, at the school district's insistence, can't prescribe any birth control.

And many doctors in private practice in Dallas-Fort Worth also won't prescribe birth control confidentially. Public health officials and women's health advocates say some doctors aren't aware that Texas laws are silent on whether a minor may independently obtain contraceptives.

As a new report last week showed, Dallas leads all U.S. cities in the percentage of teen births that weren't the mother's first delivery. Critics of state policies said they are idealistic, ideologically driven and woefully out of touch.

"We're in denial that our teens are sexually active," said Janet Realini, a doctor and former Bexar County health department leader seeking to reduce teen pregnancy. "Parents think they've talked to their kids about sex but if you talk to their kids, at least half the time, the kids don't remember that."

She cited the latest federal survey of teenagers' risky behavior, which showed that 53 percent of Texas high school students said in 2007 they'd had sexual intercourse.


Parental rights

While some social conservatives blame the state's high teen pregnancy and birth rates on immigration and cultural decline, others said they struggle to find solutions that don't impinge on parental rights.

Sen. Dan Patrick, R-Houston, acknowledged that teen pregnancy is a "serious problem," but said he felt compelled to oppose a bill last spring that would have let unmarried 16- and 17-year-old mothers give "medical consent" to obtain contraceptives, without involving their parents.

"I supported the general concept [but] the majority of the Senate agreed with me that a doctor should not prescribe contraceptives to minors without giving the parents notice," he said. "The problem is not that we need more contraceptives but more parenting."

Patrick won approval for the parental-notification provision. But the bill's author, Leticia Van de Putte, D-San Antonio, let it die rather than see Patrick's provision become law.

Van de Putte said it's ironic that under existing law, a young mother calls the shots on her child's medical care but isn't trusted to do things to prevent a quick second pregnancy, which for teens carries high risk of a premature baby.

"Until we can as legislators look at common sense rather than trying to win the next primary, we're not going to be courageous enough" to help teens, Van de Putte said.


Teaching abstinence

Texas carefully controls what public schools tell youngsters about sex and how health care providers dispense birth control. A recent study showed only 4 percent of Texas schools teach about potential benefits, as well as risks, of contraception. Abstinence-only instruction focuses on different methods' failure rates.

With the power change in Washington this year, federal funding for abstinence-only education appears to be dying. And in the Legislature, resurgent Democrats tried but failed to soften laws that make it hard for minors to be taught about contraceptives, obtain them and avoid "coverage gaps" in various health programs.

Texas is one of four states that doesn't let its Children's Health Insurance Program for low-income youngsters provide contraceptives. Though it spends $1.2 billion for Medicaid to cover 228,000 births each year, it doesn't automatically enroll those women in a 3-year-old offshoot of Medicaid that covers family planning services for a year at a time, as some states do. And minors aren't allowed in anyway.

Only Texas and Utah forbid giving teens birth control without a parent's consent at state-funded clinics.

"Texas is kind of on its own," said Elizabeth Nash, who tracks state policies for the Guttmacher Institute, a nonpartisan health research center that supports abortion rights.

She said Utah is "more straightforward" because it tells youths on a state health department Web site that they'll have to go to Planned Parenthood clinics if they want birth control and are unwilling to involve their parents.

Gov. Rick Perry, a Republican seeking re-election, "continues to support a focus on abstinence education, and he has advocated strongly for a number of initiatives that protect marriage, strengthen parental rights and provide children the best opportunity to succeed in life," said spokeswoman Katherine Cesinger.

Perry believes "the state should not usurp the role" of parents, but should try to empower them to discuss sex and its consequences with their children, Cesinger said.

Doctors who work with teens say that while some who are sexually active can navigate through a confusing state system of care, others lack street smarts – and transportation.

"The trend is the teens seem to be knowing less," said Celia Neavel, an Austin doctor who runs an adolescent health center at People's Community Clinic, a nonprofit that serves the working poor. "We certainly see some that don't know their own body at all. Or they'll come in pregnant and not even understand their own anatomy. It's really frustrating."

Kathryn Allen, vice president for community relations at Planned Parenthood of North Texas, said local doctors are "very mixed" in responses to minors' requests for birth control pills, implants or shots.

"A lot of young people switch to us when they're 16 and 17 because they're unsure whether the family doctor will immediately turn and walk out of the room and tell the parents in the waiting room," she said.

But minors generally have to have a car and $100 to get on birth control on their own at a clinic, she said. The clinics encourage young women to consult their parents, but many feel they can't, Allen said.

Van de Putte, the Democrats' leader in the Senate, said state officials need a new approach to reduce teen births.

"I've been a pharmacist for over 30 years," she said. "And I can tell you, once they start having sex, they ain't going to stop."

* * *

Should teens be given contraceptives at state-funded clinics or in public schools? 

Would you be in favor of your child being given medical care and/or contraceptives at school without your knowledge or permission?  

What do you think of "abstinence" based sex education?

 

 





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by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 2:52 AM
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Replies (1-10):
mamaof2angles
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 3:01 AM

Should teens be given contraceptives at state-funded clinics or in public schools?  As long as they know the risks associcated with taking birth control yes, how else are some young women going to be able to get birth control?

Would you be in favor of your child being given medical care and/or contraceptives at school without your knowledge or permission?  

When your child sees the school nurse for a cut finger or because they dont feel good when the nurse takes their temp, unless they are running a fever then you are not made kown of every single time your child sees the school nurse so techinally schools already give medical care with out knowledge or permission, Not that it would happen here we have Planned Parenthood for that but the second one does not apply to me.

What do you think of "abstinence" based sex education?

Its a farce, it does NOT work and its a waste of time and money.

amygray
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 8:23 AM

Should teens be given contraceptives at state-funded clinics or in public schools?  

Yes..  we end up paying for these kids having kids..  and if the young girl chooses abortion, she lives with consequences forever.. she should have the option of preventing pregnancy

Would you be in favor of your child being given medical care and/or contraceptives at school without your knowledge or permission?  

Yes. If my daughters didn't feel like they could come to me, I would rather they get birth conrtol at planned parenthood or some where like that instead of having an unplanned pregancy.  I think they should have access to condoms too so they can prevent an STD..  If they are smart and mature enough to seek the prevention, then maybe they should have access to it.  We would all love to think that our children would come to us with anything, but the reality is sometimes they don't.

What do you think of "abstinence" based sex education?

Good idea.. but I'm not sure they are being abstinent..  My step daughter had a serious boyfriend at seventeen (she is nineteen now and still with this young man) and we are pretty sure they are sexually active.. she says no, but come on.  Her momma and I made sure she has protection, and she was put on bc.  Not as permission, but as prevention for just in case she is sexally active.  She says she is not sexually active, but we all have that little bit of a doubt so we want her to be protected.  We love her and want what's best for her.

KellyGirl_TX
by Member on Sep. 7, 2009 at 1:13 PM

    **First of all, if they would close our borders or build a 40ft wall that can't be scaled and stop letting over 13,000 or more illegals cross the river every single day...alot of this would atleast slow down! 
     **Speak for yourself...I'm NOT in denial and my teens are NOT sexually active and I HAVE talked to them about sex in depth and detail many times AND I make sure they listen and UNDERSTAND.  They do remember. The problem with most is that "Parents just aren't fully parenting".  We didn't have a problem of this magnitude back in the older generations.  They knew a thing or two about "raising children" and they raised their own children...they didn't let daycares and the public school system MOSTLY do the raising of the children.  They spent something called "quality time" with them and I'm not talking about shuffling them back and forth to soccer practice and cheer practice.

   **I like how they worded that..."social conservatives blame" LOL.  It's true though that if you knew the statistics in this state on how many teen pregnancies are hispanic or white.  The latter is not the highest.  Again, if you're letting over 13,000 illegals move in every single day...that's 91,000 new people in the state every week and heading for a half a million in a month!  It IS a huge problem.  They may not all STAY in this state forever but we take the brunt anyway.

   ** Again....here we go...letting the government be in charge of teaching our kids about things like abstinence and birth control!  It should absolutely start in the home!!  If PARENTS would just DO THEIR JOB and do it right....we wouldn't be needing to be dependent on the government to step in and take matters into their hands for our minors.  Our society is just slowly crumbling over the last 50 yrs or so in that sense (and others).  Too many people have children and then don't FULLY PARENT them.  Their too busy earning money for more STUFF!!  Meanwhile, little Johnny and Susie get most of their information from anyone but their parents.  Of course you're going to end up with kids having babies this way. Geez.  It's so simple if people would just follow their repsonsibilities of raising children into RESPONSIBLE ADULTS.  I'm so sick of the people who want to just let everyone else do their job!  You shouldn't be having any children if you can't give 100% to the children you have! Ugh...this is getting frustrating.  
   ** Go Rick Perry!  You rock!  That's right...it's not the governments job to teach our kids.  It's our responsibility from beginning to end!  The government was never intended to have to do such things as help us parent our children.  Again...it all goes back to US...AS PARENTS!
   **Again...teens seem to be KNOWING LESS?(first of all,overall, in the big picture it's purposely 'dumbing them down'--more dumb people =more people who need big government to live their lives for them)  Hmmm...Why are they 'knowing less'? Maybe because no one has REALLY spent any serious TIME with them discussing things like: their body, sex, pregnancy and all that goes with it.  I'm so glad I have.  I have daughters that will tell you to your face that...they don't believe they need to date if they aren't looking for a husband (dating is just something society says teens need to do because they need fun in their lives).  I've taught my girls something different and they are proud of it.  They watch all the other girls having fun dating, getting their hearts broken, getting used and left behind and also walking the halls 9mos pregnant and passing the guy that helped get them that way while he has his arm around his new girl for the week.  Yeah, that's fun isn't it?? I love my daughters enough to teach them something they will thank me for later.  Nothing will convince me any different. NOTHING.
quote:"""I've been a pharmacist for over 30 years," she said. "And I can tell you, once they start having sex, they ain't going to stop." ""
  **That's right!  So lets do what we can beforehand to parent and teach our kids that...just because other kids all do it-THAT DOESN'T MAKE IT THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  I get so tired of hearing how parents just want their kids to have happy teen years".....let me tell you, at the rate we're going with this.  THIS ISN'T MAKING THEM HAPPY in the long run.  It's ruining their futures!
   I am in no way in favor of government being in charge of teaching my kid about sex or helping them get contraceptives. I'd rather teach my daughters to keep their legs closed!  Wow...what an easy fix.  It's so simple it's just that in todays society...it's not "the fun thing to do" and if it isn't FUN then life just sucks.  This is what's wrong with our kids today.

Yeah, I know...this was extra long but it's something I feel strongly about and yes, I know.  I'm extremely opinionated on some things.  It's just IN ME.  Maybe my parents instilled that in me...imagine that.

cowgirlsr2
by Silver Member on Sep. 7, 2009 at 1:39 PM

I have 3 teen girls 19-17-13 and only 1 is sexually active. The 17 yr old has been active since she was 12 ans she was sneaking off to the Planned parenthood clinic which can not give out info to parents. Now the older 2 live with dad except for 2 yrs the 19 yr old lived with me. I know she is not active she never told me or anyone she had been severely abused and I don't know if she will ever be active and my youngest I talk to her all the time about sex and abstinence.Me and her have always had an open relationship.I believe parents are in charge of all of there children's health concerns until they are 18.If I found out my youngest went behind my back to one of these clinics there would be hell to pay. I would want to know if she is receiving proper treatment the right kind of birth control for her and any other concerns there may be. They are our responsibility and just because they think they know what they are doing doesn't make it so.


bakebiscotti
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 1:43 PM

Yes to the OP, young women should have unfettered access to birth control.

Aldea
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 1:48 PM

I totally agree with all this !

I have two teens and 1 adult child now.  We have taught abstinence to them by talking to them, being open.  And using "Passport To Purity" throu AFA.  American Family Association.  My oldest 21 and her beau are courting .  I believe if more parents parented rather than sending their children to nanny government to teach them all they want them to know about there would not be such a problem.  Parents need to get more involved in their childrens lives.


Quoting KellyGirl_TX:

    **First of all, if they would close our borders or build a 40ft wall that can't be scaled and stop letting over 13,000 or more illegals cross the river every single day...alot of this would atleast slow down! 
     **Speak for yourself...I'm NOT in denial and my teens are NOT sexually active and I HAVE talked to them about sex in depth and detail many times AND I make sure they listen and UNDERSTAND.  They do remember. The problem with most is that "Parents just aren't fully parenting".  We didn't have a problem of this magnitude back in the older generations.  They knew a thing or two about "raising children" and they raised their own children...they didn't let daycares and the public school system MOSTLY do the raising of the children.  They spent something called "quality time" with them and I'm not talking about shuffling them back and forth to soccer practice and cheer practice.

   **I like how they worded that..."social conservatives blame" LOL.  It's true though that if you knew the statistics in this state on how many teen pregnancies are hispanic or white.  The latter is not the highest.  Again, if you're letting over 13,000 illegals move in every single day...that's 91,000 new people in the state every week and heading for a half a million in a month!  It IS a huge problem.  They may not all STAY in this state forever but we take the brunt anyway.

   ** Again....here we go...letting the government be in charge of teaching our kids about things like abstinence and birth control!  It should absolutely start in the home!!  If PARENTS would just DO THEIR JOB and do it right....we wouldn't be needing to be dependent on the government to step in and take matters into their hands for our minors.  Our society is just slowly crumbling over the last 50 yrs or so in that sense (and others).  Too many people have children and then don't FULLY PARENT them.  Their too busy earning money for more STUFF!!  Meanwhile, little Johnny and Susie get most of their information from anyone but their parents.  Of course you're going to end up with kids having babies this way. Geez.  It's so simple if people would just follow their repsonsibilities of raising children into RESPONSIBLE ADULTS.  I'm so sick of the people who want to just let everyone else do their job!  You shouldn't be having any children if you can't give 100% to the children you have! Ugh...this is getting frustrating.  
   ** Go Rick Perry!  You rock!  That's right...it's not the governments job to teach our kids.  It's our responsibility from beginning to end!  The government was never intended to have to do such things as help us parent our children.  Again...it all goes back to US...AS PARENTS!
   **Again...teens seem to be KNOWING LESS?(first of all,overall, in the big picture it's purposely 'dumbing them down'--more dumb people =more people who need big government to live their lives for them)  Hmmm...Why are they 'knowing less'? Maybe because no one has REALLY spent any serious TIME with them discussing things like: their body, sex, pregnancy and all that goes with it.  I'm so glad I have.  I have daughters that will tell you to your face that...they don't believe they need to date if they aren't looking for a husband (dating is just something society says teens need to do because they need fun in their lives).  I've taught my girls something different and they are proud of it.  They watch all the other girls having fun dating, getting their hearts broken, getting used and left behind and also walking the halls 9mos pregnant and passing the guy that helped get them that way while he has his arm around his new girl for the week.  Yeah, that's fun isn't it?? I love my daughters enough to teach them something they will thank me for later.  Nothing will convince me any different. NOTHING.
quote:"""I've been a pharmacist for over 30 years," she said. "And I can tell you, once they start having sex, they ain't going to stop." ""
  **That's right!  So lets do what we can beforehand to parent and teach our kids that...just because other kids all do it-THAT DOESN'T MAKE IT THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  I get so tired of hearing how parents just want their kids to have happy teen years".....let me tell you, at the rate we're going with this.  THIS ISN'T MAKING THEM HAPPY in the long run.  It's ruining their futures!
   I am in no way in favor of government being in charge of teaching my kid about sex or helping them get contraceptives. I'd rather teach my daughters to keep their legs closed!  Wow...what an easy fix.  It's so simple it's just that in todays society...it's not "the fun thing to do" and if it isn't FUN then life just sucks.  This is what's wrong with our kids today.

Yeah, I know...this was extra long but it's something I feel strongly about and yes, I know.  I'm extremely opinionated on some things.  It's just IN ME.  Maybe my parents instilled that in me...imagine that.


witch_e_woman
by Bronze Member on Sep. 7, 2009 at 2:32 PM
1. This should be a nation wide law to begin with.

2. Yes, it should be given to all kids w/o the parents having to be told.

3. Kids should be given the chance to obtain all forms of birth control starting in the 6th grade.


Quoting Cafe GroupAdmin:

AUSTIN – Texas, a leader in teen pregnancy and the state where more teens give birth to subsequent children than in any other, maintains one of the most restrictive policies in the nation for minors to obtain prescription birth control.


Not even young parents in Texas can get birth control without their own parents' permission at nearly a third of the family planning clinics on contract with the state health department.


While most privately and publicly funded clinics in North Texas prescribe contraceptives without insisting that parents be notified, all 10 school-based clinics run by Parkland Health & Hospital System in Dallas must have a parent's signed consent. One in Carrollton-Farmers Branch, at the school district's insistence, can't prescribe any birth control.


And many doctors in private practice in Dallas-Fort Worth also won't prescribe birth control confidentially. Public health officials and women's health advocates say some doctors aren't aware that Texas laws are silent on whether a minor may independently obtain contraceptives.


As a new report last week showed, Dallas leads all U.S. cities in the percentage of teen births that weren't the mother's first delivery. Critics of state policies said they are idealistic, ideologically driven and woefully out of touch.


"We're in denial that our teens are sexually active," said Janet Realini, a doctor and former Bexar County health department leader seeking to reduce teen pregnancy. "Parents think they've talked to their kids about sex but if you talk to their kids, at least half the time, the kids don't remember that."


She cited the latest federal survey of teenagers' risky behavior, which showed that 53 percent of Texas high school students said in 2007 they'd had sexual intercourse.



Parental rights


While some social conservatives blame the state's high teen pregnancy and birth rates on immigration and cultural decline, others said they struggle to find solutions that don't impinge on parental rights.


Sen. Dan Patrick, R-Houston, acknowledged that teen pregnancy is a "serious problem," but said he felt compelled to oppose a bill last spring that would have let unmarried 16- and 17-year-old mothers give "medical consent" to obtain contraceptives, without involving their parents.


"I supported the general concept [but] the majority of the Senate agreed with me that a doctor should not prescribe contraceptives to minors without giving the parents notice," he said. "The problem is not that we need more contraceptives but more parenting."


Patrick won approval for the parental-notification provision. But the bill's author, Leticia Van de Putte, D-San Antonio, let it die rather than see Patrick's provision become law.


Van de Putte said it's ironic that under existing law, a young mother calls the shots on her child's medical care but isn't trusted to do things to prevent a quick second pregnancy, which for teens carries high risk of a premature baby.


"Until we can as legislators look at common sense rather than trying to win the next primary, we're not going to be courageous enough" to help teens, Van de Putte said.


Teaching abstinence


Texas carefully controls what public schools tell youngsters about sex and how health care providers dispense birth control. A recent study showed only 4 percent of Texas schools teach about potential benefits, as well as risks, of contraception. Abstinence-only instruction focuses on different methods' failure rates.


With the power change in Washington this year, federal funding for abstinence-only education appears to be dying. And in the Legislature, resurgent Democrats tried but failed to soften laws that make it hard for minors to be taught about contraceptives, obtain them and avoid "coverage gaps" in various health programs.


Texas is one of four states that doesn't let its Children's Health Insurance Program for low-income youngsters provide contraceptives. Though it spends $1.2 billion for Medicaid to cover 228,000 births each year, it doesn't automatically enroll those women in a 3-year-old offshoot of Medicaid that covers family planning services for a year at a time, as some states do. And minors aren't allowed in anyway.


Only Texas and Utah forbid giving teens birth control without a parent's consent at state-funded clinics.


"Texas is kind of on its own," said Elizabeth Nash, who tracks state policies for the Guttmacher Institute, a nonpartisan health research center that supports abortion rights.


She said Utah is "more straightforward" because it tells youths on a state health department Web site that they'll have to go to Planned Parenthood clinics if they want birth control and are unwilling to involve their parents.


Gov. Rick Perry, a Republican seeking re-election, "continues to support a focus on abstinence education, and he has advocated strongly for a number of initiatives that protect marriage, strengthen parental rights and provide children the best opportunity to succeed in life," said spokeswoman Katherine Cesinger.


Perry believes "the state should not usurp the role" of parents, but should try to empower them to discuss sex and its consequences with their children, Cesinger said.


Doctors who work with teens say that while some who are sexually active can navigate through a confusing state system of care, others lack street smarts – and transportation.


"The trend is the teens seem to be knowing less," said Celia Neavel, an Austin doctor who runs an adolescent health center at People's Community Clinic, a nonprofit that serves the working poor. "We certainly see some that don't know their own body at all. Or they'll come in pregnant and not even understand their own anatomy. It's really frustrating."


Kathryn Allen, vice president for community relations at Planned Parenthood of North Texas, said local doctors are "very mixed" in responses to minors' requests for birth control pills, implants or shots.


"A lot of young people switch to us when they're 16 and 17 because they're unsure whether the family doctor will immediately turn and walk out of the room and tell the parents in the waiting room," she said.


But minors generally have to have a car and $100 to get on birth control on their own at a clinic, she said. The clinics encourage young women to consult their parents, but many feel they can't, Allen said.


Van de Putte, the Democrats' leader in the Senate, said state officials need a new approach to reduce teen births.


"I've been a pharmacist for over 30 years," she said. "And I can tell you, once they start having sex, they ain't going to stop."


* * *


Should teens be given contraceptives at state-funded clinics or in public schools?


Would you be in favor of your child being given medical care and/or contraceptives at school without your knowledge or permission?


What do you think of "abstinence" based sex education?



Raven (WitchE)


*****************)O(******************
~* "I AM a Wife, Mother/Grandmother, Supporter of OUR Brave Men & Woman Fighting to Keep this Country Safe, Feminist, Nature Loving Conservationist, ProChoice Advocate, Advocate for Abused/Exploited & Neglected Children, Advocate for Abused Animals, Member of the Local Humane Society, Harley-Davidson Member, Member of the NRA, Member of the Democratic Party, Heavy Metal/Rock-n-Roll listener, Beer Drinking, Whiskey Drinking, Smoking, Lesbian, Witch - & YES, I AM Damn Proud of Who & What I AM"!!! *~
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tericared
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 2:38 PM


Quoting bakebiscotti:

Yes to the OP, young women should have unfettered access to birth control.

this......my friend you dont know what a beacon of light your reply was when  I saw one about blaming this "problem" on illegals...sweet niblets the insanity..

MarineWife1108
by on Sep. 7, 2009 at 2:50 PM

 

Should teens be given contraceptives at state-funded clinics or in public schools? 

Yes. If for some reason my relationship with my teen was not open enough that they could talk to me about sex and pregnancy prevention, I would not care if they gave him/her contraceptives. I would rather them be safe than sorry.

Would you be in favor of your child being given medical care and/or contraceptives at school without your knowledge or permission?  

As a PP pointed out, schools don't tell you when your child goes in for a cut on the finger or when they get their temp checked. I would be in favor of schools handing out contraceptives. I intend on having a conversationally open relationship with my daughter to where she can ask me to take her to the doctor to get on BC whenever she decides she's ready to have sex.

What do you think of "abstinence" based sex education?

I think it is a waste and it NEVER works. These days it takes a special kind of person to wait until marraige and those people are few and far between. I believe those numbers will only dwindle. It may work for a day or two but not much longer. I think they should have an abstinence class for the parents who aren't comfortable with anything else and a class that will hand out condoms for parents who are comfortable with it. Can be the same teacher just slightly different focus.

emilysmom1966
by Silver Member on Sep. 7, 2009 at 2:54 PM

I think so but I would like to think that education and counseling comes with it. To have my daughter face the horrors of teen sex all alone is frightening. I remember my experience- I know I would have never gone to my mother but, I would have like to have some counseling besides my friends who knew less about the matter.

The latest statistics on the world epidemic of HIV and AIDS were published by UNAIDS/WHO in July 2008, and refer to the end of 2007.


Estimate Range
People living with HIV/AIDS in 2007 33.0 million 30.3-36.1 million
Adults living with HIV/AIDS in 2007 30.8 million 28.2-34.0 million
Women living with HIV/AIDS in 2007 15.5 million 14.2-16.9 million
Children living with HIV/AIDS in 2007 2.0 million 1.9-2.3 million
People newly infected with HIV in 2007 2.7 million 2.2-3.2 million
Children newly infected with HIV in 2007 0.37 million 0.33-0.41 million
AIDS deaths in 2007 2.0 million 1.8-2.3 million
Child AIDS deaths in 2007 0.27 million 0.25-0.29 million

More than 25 million people have died of AIDS since 1981.

Africa has 11.6 million AIDS orphans.

At the end of 2007, women accounted for 50% of all adults living with HIV worldwide, and for 59% in sub-Saharan Africa.

Young people (under 25 years old) account for half of all new HIV infections worldwide.

In developing and transitional countries, 9.7 million people are in immediate need of life-saving AIDS drugs; of these, only 2.99 million (31%) are receiving the drugs.

Quoting tericared:


Quoting bakebiscotti:

Yes to the OP, young women should have unfettered access to birth control.

this......my friend you dont know what a beacon of light your reply was when  I saw one about blaming this "problem" on illegals...sweet niblets the insanity..

 

Luc and Emily my reason for breathing!


About 35 and over with small children:This group is for Mommies wanting to make new friends with other Moms of "advanced maternal age" with little ones. http://www.cafemom.com/group/35andoversmallchildren

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