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Colic- News article says folk Remidies DO NOT WORK? What do you think about that?

Posted by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 4:35 PM
  • 9 Replies

 

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CHICAGO (AP) — That nonstop crying of a baby with colic has some parents turning to popular folk remedies. Unfortunately, there's no good evidence they work, according to a review of 15 studies.

The results don't surprise New York City mom Leni Calas, 32. She tried many treatments studied, including fennel extract, sugar drops and massage, and says nothing worked for baby Roxy, who cried almost nonstop for six months.

"Our daughter would wake up and cry literally morning to night without napping," Calas said. "She would just literally scream herself purple, and then throw up because she had been screaming so much."

Calas said she and her husband couldn't accept what doctors told them — that there was nothing wrong with their baby and that she'd outgrow the crying spells. But that's exactly what happened.

And that's what most doctors believe about colic, which affects up to roughly 20 percent of U.S. babies, usually in the first few months of life.

If a physical problem can be found, the condition is usually not considered colic. Gastric reflux and protein allergies are among conditions that can cause digestive upsets and crying spells in babies, and are often mistakenly called colic.

That may explain why some remedies thought to ease digestive problems may not work in babies with true colic, including alternative treatments containing fennel, herbal teas and probiotics, which all were included in the medical review.

Alternative remedies are not tested and approved by the federal government, and the purity and amounts of their ingredients are not always verified. Parents should always check with their pediatricians if they plan to give their children an alternative treatment, said Dr. Jatinder Bhatia, head of the American Academy of Pediatrics nutrition committee.

The study by researchers at the University of Exeter in England was published online Monday in Pediatrics. The researchers analyzed results from 15 studies on various alternative remedies, massage and chiropractic methods advertised as effective against colic. Overall, almost 1,000 infants were involved.

Few of the studies were rigorously conducted and all had "major limitations," the researchers said.

"Thus, the notion that any form of complementary and alternative medicine is effective for infantile colic is currently not supported from the evidence" studied, they said.

None of the studies reported side effects, but one involving an herbal remedy listed vomiting, constipation and other symptoms possibly related to the treatment.

Although there were promising signs with a few treatments, including fennel extract, herbal teas and sugar solutions, better research is needed to provide conclusive evidence, said researcher Rachel Perry, the review's lead author.

Her own two children had colic, but it disappeared around the time she tried giving them an over-the-counter herbal liquid promoted as effective against colic.

Because colic does go away on its own, it's hard to determine whether specific treatments might work, she said.

"As a desperate mother, I can understand the sort of desire to try anything," Perry said.

She urged parents not to give up, since it's possible better designed studies on alternative remedies will show more definitive results.

Bhatia, a professor at Georgia Health Sciences University, said the study results don't mean that none of the treatments will work for any baby. Some parents do report success with alternative remedies. Sometimes that might be because parents think it will work and they feel calmer, which can in turn calm the baby — a placebo effect. But even if there's only a placebo effect, there's no reason not to continue, as long as doctors have been consulted and the treatment is safe, Bhatia said.

Parents should always check with their pediatricians if they plan to give their children an alternative treatment, said Bhatia, For Leni Calas' baby Roxy, now almost 2, the incessant crying spells tapered down and by 9 months disappeared.

Calas said she's convinced of one thing "that no one wants to hear — that the only thing that really does cure it is time."

 

HAVE YOU HAD A CHILD WITH COLIC?

What didn't work?

HAVE YOU FOUND ANY FOLK/NON-MEDICINAL OR NON-TRADITIONAL METHODS OR MEDICINES WHICH WORK..

(Seriously anything that works.. tell us about it!)

by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 4:35 PM
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Replies (1-9):
NookBoookMom
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 4:36 PM

omg NOTHING WORKED , for almost 9 months she WAILED and WAILED we thought we were going crazy we tried everything over the counter for gas etc, and even old wives tales nothing,

2boys4momma
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 4:39 PM

 The Vaccume running.. works for my son.. But you can only stand that noise just so long too.. :(

ShadowRaven
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 4:52 PM

I find this part interesting. In animals, they have classified the different types of colic. The causes (gastrointestinal/digestive issues, diet, etc). The symptoms (restlessness, arching back, crying, disdended stomach, bowel problems). And treatment.

And yet...if anything works for human colic, or if they find a cause, it's not classified as true colic.

Quoting 2boys4momma:

 

CHICAGO (AP) — That nonstop crying of a baby with colic has some parents turning to popular folk remedies. Unfortunately, there's no good evidence they work, according to a review of 15 studies.

The results don't surprise New York City mom Leni Calas, 32. She tried many treatments studied, including fennel extract, sugar drops and massage, and says nothing worked for baby Roxy, who cried almost nonstop for six months.

"Our daughter would wake up and cry literally morning to night without napping," Calas said. "She would just literally scream herself purple, and then throw up because she had been screaming so much."

Calas said she and her husband couldn't accept what doctors told them — that there was nothing wrong with their baby and that she'd outgrow the crying spells. But that's exactly what happened.

And that's what most doctors believe about colic, which affects up to roughly 20 percent of U.S. babies, usually in the first few months of life.

If a physical problem can be found, the condition is usually not considered colic. Gastric reflux and protein allergies are among conditions that can cause digestive upsets and crying spells in babies, and are often mistakenly called colic.

That may explain why some remedies thought to ease digestive problems may not work in babies with true colic, including alternative treatments containing fennel, herbal teas and probiotics, which all were included in the medical review.

Alternative remedies are not tested and approved by the federal government, and the purity and amounts of their ingredients are not always verified. Parents should always check with their pediatricians if they plan to give their children an alternative treatment, said Dr. Jatinder Bhatia, head of the American Academy of Pediatrics nutrition committee.

The study by researchers at the University of Exeter in England was published online Monday in Pediatrics. The researchers analyzed results from 15 studies on various alternative remedies, massage and chiropractic methods advertised as effective against colic. Overall, almost 1,000 infants were involved.

Few of the studies were rigorously conducted and all had "major limitations," the researchers said.

"Thus, the notion that any form of complementary and alternative medicine is effective for infantile colic is currently not supported from the evidence" studied, they said.

None of the studies reported side effects, but one involving an herbal remedy listed vomiting, constipation and other symptoms possibly related to the treatment.

Although there were promising signs with a few treatments, including fennel extract, herbal teas and sugar solutions, better research is needed to provide conclusive evidence, said researcher Rachel Perry, the review's lead author.

Her own two children had colic, but it disappeared around the time she tried giving them an over-the-counter herbal liquid promoted as effective against colic.

Because colic does go away on its own, it's hard to determine whether specific treatments might work, she said.

"As a desperate mother, I can understand the sort of desire to try anything," Perry said.

She urged parents not to give up, since it's possible better designed studies on alternative remedies will show more definitive results.

Bhatia, a professor at Georgia Health Sciences University, said the study results don't mean that none of the treatments will work for any baby. Some parents do report success with alternative remedies. Sometimes that might be because parents think it will work and they feel calmer, which can in turn calm the baby — a placebo effect. But even if there's only a placebo effect, there's no reason not to continue, as long as doctors have been consulted and the treatment is safe, Bhatia said.

Parents should always check with their pediatricians if they plan to give their children an alternative treatment, said Bhatia, For Leni Calas' baby Roxy, now almost 2, the incessant crying spells tapered down and by 9 months disappeared.

Calas said she's convinced of one thing "that no one wants to hear — that the only thing that really does cure it is time."


HAVE YOU HAD A CHILD WITH COLIC?

What didn't work?

HAVE YOU FOUND ANY FOLK/NON-MEDICINAL OR NON-TRADITIONAL METHODS OR MEDICINES WHICH WORK..

(Seriously anything that works.. tell us about it!)


erinsmom1964
by Gold Member on Mar. 28, 2011 at 5:03 PM

 I think that colic isn't real.  i think it is a catch all phrase used to try and calm parents fears( although alot of times justified)  and shut them up because the Dr can't figure out what is wrong.  I had 3 different Pedis tell me 2 of my children had colic when in realty they had reflux.  it was especially hard to figure it out for my DD as she has silent reflux meaning she doesn't throw up.  I have read studies from pedi GI Drs suggesting colic isn't real either but a milder form of reflux.  

I don't believe for a minute that babies cry incessantly for no real reason.  If we as adults where so misearble as to cry all day we would never accept some quack telling us just to wait 6-12 months and it will go away yet we do when it comes to our poor infants.  I think because they can't tell us.

Sofiabug
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 5:15 PM
My oldest had colic for her first six months. Time helped, nothing else.
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liteofmine71
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 5:19 PM

my brother in law had it, and MIL says that they didn't discover until he was around 7yo that he was allergic to everything! !  so, really, it wasn't colic at all, but a symptom of real suffering!

she said, looking back now, it's horrible to know that and not have been able to do anything about it.  he still has GI issues and it's always something he ate, that they find he is allergic to later.

liteofmine71
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 5:19 PM
Quoting erinsmom1964:

 I think that colic isn't real.  i think it is a catch all phrase used to try and calm parents fears( although alot of times justified)  and shut them up because the Dr can't figure out what is wrong.  I had 3 different Pedis tell me 2 of my children had colic when in realty they had reflux.  it was especially hard to figure it out for my DD as she has silent reflux meaning she doesn't throw up.  I have read studies from pedi GI Drs suggesting colic isn't real either but a milder form of reflux.  

I don't believe for a minute that babies cry incessantly for no real reason.  If we as adults where so misearble as to cry all day we would never accept some quack telling us just to wait 6-12 months and it will go away yet we do when it comes to our poor infants.  I think because they can't tell us.

i agree with you completely!!
ShadowRaven
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 5:40 PM

Your 1 month old? Try a white noise machine instead. Or a cd of crashing waves. Same effect, much quieter. :)

Quoting 2boys4momma:

 The Vaccume running.. works for my son.. But you can only stand that noise just so long too.. :(


jabs54
by Platinum Member on Mar. 28, 2011 at 9:22 PM

 Nothing worked for us. 

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