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can someone please explain the phrase

Posted by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 12:10 AM
  • 6 Replies
"you can't have your cake and eat it too"????

From what I understand it mean you can't have everything you want. But I don't really get it... It's your cake, why can't you eat it??? Lol
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by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 12:10 AM
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Replies (1-6):
Rockabye
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 12:15 AM
2 moms liked this

If you eat its gone so you cant keep it and eat it

phoenixmom2011
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 12:18 AM



Quoting Rockabye:

If you eat its gone so you cant keep it and eat it


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tth328
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 12:19 AM
Ohhhhhhhh. Okay now that make more sense. Thanks.


Quoting Rockabye:

If you eat its gone so you cant keep it and eat it


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MrsTBailey
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 12:19 AM
Darn i thought it had to do with the aspect of losing weight! Oh well lol
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caro100
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 12:26 AM
I thought it meant you cant have your cake ie. save it and eat it too.
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offrdngal
by Terri on Feb. 12, 2012 at 9:15 AM

 

To have one's cake and eat it too is a popular English idiomatic proverb or figure of speech, sometimes stated as eat one's cake and have it too or simply have one's cake and eat it. This is most often used negatively, to connote the idea of consuming a thing whilst managing to preserve it. This may also indicate having or wanting more than one can handle or deserve, or trying to have two incompatible things. The proverb's meaning is similar to the phrases, "you can't have it both ways" and "you can't have the best of both worlds." Conversely, in the positive sense, it would refer to "having it both ways" or "having the best of both worlds."

 

[edit] History

The phrase's earliest recording is from 1546 as "wolde you bothe eate your cake, and have your cake?" (John Heywood's "A dialogue Conteinyng the Nomber in Effect of All the Prouerbes in the Englishe Tongue").[1] This phrase alludes to the impossibility of eating your cake and still having it afterwards. The modern version (where the clauses are reversed) is a corruption which was first signaled in 1812. Further misconception has been perpetuated in main-stream media by Douglas Pace[citation needed] during his argument that it is in fact the order of the eating and having which matters, similar to the chicken and the egg conundrum.

Modern Usage

"You want to save it and destroy it at the same time"

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