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Probiotics benefits

Posted by on May. 5, 2012 at 9:10 PM
  • 9 Replies

I was just wondering how would probiotic help my 3 old son? how often should he take it?

by on May. 5, 2012 at 9:10 PM
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Replies (1-9):
Reina13
by Bronze Member on May. 6, 2012 at 10:54 AM

I think that is something you should talk to your pedi about first.

erinsmom1964
by Gold Member on May. 6, 2012 at 11:33 AM
1 mom liked this

Probiotics help by giving you a good amount of the good bacteria that is needed to properly digest food.  When food is properly digested that strengthens your immune system.  We give ours twice a day to Erin ( she is 3) by splitting the package in half.

We found out about the benefits of them after Erin had 2 rounds of antibiotics for a bad sinus infection.  She became unable to keep any food or water down.  It was so bad she was hospitalized for 3 days on IVS.  immediately after being released( they tried to tell me she had just be dehydrated from the flu even though I argued it had something to do with the antibiotics as it happened both times after she stopped them) the symptoms returned.  We couldn't get enough in her to get a stool sample at first and she was literally an hour away from being re-hospitalized when we finally got her to take fluids.  Then we got a sample had it tested and found the only thing wrong was lack of fecal flora.  After her first dose she was actually hungry for the first time in over 2 weeks and it only got better from there.  She has never even had the sniffles since we started.  That was 7 months ago. If you research you will see many Drs call the digestive track an "organ" that is overlooked in our general health.  But if its off it lowers your immune response, interferes with absorption of the nutrients from the food you eat.

We use Culturelle for kids.  It has no odor no flavor no texture Erin just drinks it in a cup of water.  You can get it here at Walmart( cheapest) Walgreen and our Safeway even.  Mind you Erin already ate Greek yogurt and it just wasn't enough. ( this is why yogurt is good for you the good bacteria)  Erin also drinks Kefir milk.

marisab
by on May. 6, 2012 at 10:37 PM

probiotics help with digestive issues (like tummy troubles and diarrea)


AM-BRAT
by Amber on May. 6, 2012 at 10:44 PM
I take probiotics but don't give them to my children.

You can also get what you meed with yogurt.

Make yogurt a regular thing fof him maybe? Good stuff, not the dyes and hfcs stuff like gogurts.
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LindaClement
by on May. 7, 2012 at 12:08 AM

Regular, natural plain yogurt (the kind without pectin, gelatin and any kind of sugar or sweetener or flavouring) is all anyone 'needs'... they come with what are packaged and sold as extremely expensive 'probiotic' versions with pretty labels.

Little kids often prefer it with fresh fruit, dried fruit and nuts, or granola. A little (like less than a tsp per cup) maple syrup will kill the super-sour taste completely.

erinsmom1964
by Gold Member on May. 7, 2012 at 12:43 AM


Quoting LindaClement:

Regular, natural plain yogurt (the kind without pectin, gelatin and any kind of sugar or sweetener or flavouring) is all anyone 'needs'... they come with what are packaged and sold as extremely expensive 'probiotic' versions with pretty labels.

Little kids often prefer it with fresh fruit, dried fruit and nuts, or granola. A little (like less than a tsp per cup) maple syrup will kill the super-sour taste completely.

Actually that isn't true at all.  Yogurt especially regular plain has little probiotics in them.  Greek has more but it is still not enough to be a good dose.  My DD had eaten regular plain Greek yogurt which has way more strains in it everyday since about 8 months old and STILL was hospitalized once and almost rehospitalized from being so dehydrated because she couldn't keep anything down and what little made it in here and then was immediately was expelled thru diarrhea.  IF you are having issues JUST a yogurt especially the regular ones will not be of much if any benefit. 

OP do your research 

LindaClement
by on May. 7, 2012 at 2:10 AM

As much as the folks selling probiotics would LOVE to have everyone believe, they are not a panacea.

You can have 'lots of probiotics' throughout your whole body, and still catch e.coli O157:H7.

Fresh yogurt is populated with probiotics. Greek yogurt only has more because 1. they thrive in fats, and 2. it's strained, so it has less water by volume.

Greeks don't eat that kind of yogurt in Greece.

Quoting erinsmom1964:


Quoting LindaClement:

Regular, natural plain yogurt (the kind without pectin, gelatin and any kind of sugar or sweetener or flavouring) is all anyone 'needs'... they come with what are packaged and sold as extremely expensive 'probiotic' versions with pretty labels.

Little kids often prefer it with fresh fruit, dried fruit and nuts, or granola. A little (like less than a tsp per cup) maple syrup will kill the super-sour taste completely.

Actually that isn't true at all.  Yogurt especially regular plain has little probiotics in them.  Greek has more but it is still not enough to be a good dose.  My DD had eaten regular plain Greek yogurt which has way more strains in it everyday since about 8 months old and STILL was hospitalized once and almost rehospitalized from being so dehydrated because she couldn't keep anything down and what little made it in here and then was immediately was expelled thru diarrhea.  IF you are having issues JUST a yogurt especially the regular ones will not be of much if any benefit. 

OP do your research 


Taniaengel
by on May. 7, 2012 at 3:15 AM

While probiotics have known benefits, there are many factors to consider when choosing a specific probiotic supplement.

First, note that different probiotic products utilize different bacteria strains.  Numerous probiotic strains are available, many of which have very little to no clinical data regarding their benefit or physiological activity.

Second, stability is a huge problem with most strains of bacteria.  Shelf-life for most strains is very short and many strains need refrigeration.  Even refrigerated products can have poor viability and very short shelf-lives.  In addition, many strains that have good data in culture or in vitro show no viability when exposed to the acutal human digestive process.  If a strain does not make it through digestion all the way to the intestine to colonize, its benefit is questionable.

Research before you buy anything laying around or stuffed in the shelves....or worst ...showed on the TV

Tania

Taniaengel
by on May. 7, 2012 at 4:01 PM

what is it exacly that your son have? what is he taking?

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