Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Advice for Moms Advice for Moms

opinions about smoking while pregnant , breast feeding, and smoking around children.

Posted by   + Show Post
Want to get everyones opinions on smoking while prego, while breastfeeding, and while your holding your babies...

Ill be honest i smoked probley four cigs after i found out
i was prego with both pregnancies. I didnt smoke.while
bfing and never smoked holdin either of my children.
But my SIL smoked heavily (a pack-apack n a half) daily
threw out her last pregnancy. Her son is 8months has
bad reflux, is constantly fighting ear infections and docs
r worried about the growth of his head. She also
smoked while bfing and smokes while holding him. I
know that kids get sick and have those same issues
and it has nothing to do with weather there parents
smoke or not. but all those at once plus he always has
a runny nose and slit cough. ? Shes prego again with
her 3rd child and shes doing the same thing . Well
actually shes up to bout 2packs a day. Im trying.to
explain to her that alot of those issues probley have to
do with her smoking so much. She always argues that
her first child is perfectly healthy. Even tho her first child
is 3 and still has to do breathing treatments 2x a day.
So plz give me ur opinions on the smoking. And tell me
if im wrong to keep trying to get her to stop smoking for
now
PS im going to have her read this post
by on Oct. 1, 2012 at 11:14 PM
Replies (11-20):
Gina_C
by on Oct. 2, 2012 at 3:29 AM
No one is attacking you. I'm just saying, it can be done.


Quoting opinionatedmom:

 why are you attacking me? I am not the one doing it. I have had no luck with quitting. I have tried lots of times.


Quoting Gina_C:

Actually, you can. I smoked for 14 years before I got pregnant. People quit smoking every day. And it's not even that. How hard is it to set your damn kid down before you light up? Or maybe take it outside so no one else has to suffer through it? Especially when it's making your kids sick!! Just disgusting, it really is.



Quoting opinionatedmom:


 you cant just break an addiction overnight. its not that easy



 


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
opinionatedmom
by on Oct. 2, 2012 at 3:33 AM

 I wish it was as easy for me as it was for you. I have tried everything to quit. I just can't do it.

Quoting Gina_C:

No one is attacking you. I'm just saying, it can be done.


Quoting opinionatedmom:

 why are you attacking me? I am not the one doing it. I have had no luck with quitting. I have tried lots of times.


Quoting Gina_C:

Actually, you can. I smoked for 14 years before I got pregnant. People quit smoking every day. And it's not even that. How hard is it to set your damn kid down before you light up? Or maybe take it outside so no one else has to suffer through it? Especially when it's making your kids sick!! Just disgusting, it really is.



Quoting opinionatedmom:


 you cant just break an addiction overnight. its not that easy



 


 

-PB
by Gold Member on Oct. 2, 2012 at 6:57 AM

 I think all are a horrible idea but I read an article a while back that said if you are going to smoke during pregnancy and around your baby the best thing you can do is breastfeed because of the antibodies in breast milk help to keep allergies/asthma at bay.

And to the people who think that an addiction can't just be kicked overnight....I quit cold turkey April 15, 2008 and never looked back.  Its take a few days to get through the cravings but if you truly want to quit you can do it.

-PB
by Gold Member on Oct. 2, 2012 at 7:00 AM

 I found the article....Its on kellymom.com

http://kellymom.com/bf/can-i-breastfeed/lifestyle/smoking/

Should a mother who smokes cigarettes breastfeed?

First of all, a mom who can’t stop smoking should breastfeed. Breastfeeding provides many immunities that help your baby fight illness and can even help counteract some of the effects of cigarette smoke on your baby: for example, breastfeeding has been shown to decrease the negative effects of cigarette smoke on a baby’s lungs. It’s definitely better if breastfeeding moms not smoke, but if you can’t stop or cut down, then it is better to smoke and breastfeed than to smoke and formula feed.

The more cigarettes that you smoke, the greater the health risks for you and your baby. If you can’t stop smoking, or don’t want to stop smoking, it’s safer for your baby if you cut down on the number of cigarettes that you smoke.

What happens to babies when they are exposed to cigarette smoke?

  • Babies and children who are exposed to cigarette smoke have a much higher incidence of pneumonia, asthma, ear infections, bronchitis, sinus infections, eye irritation, and croup.
  • Colic occurs more often in babies whose mothers or fathers smoke or if a breastfeeding mother smokes. Researchers believe that not only does the nicotine transferred into mother’s milk upset baby but the passive smoke in the home acts as an irritant. Babies of smoking parents fuss more, and mothers who smoke may be less able to cope with a colicky baby (due to lower levels of prolactin).
  • Heavy smoking by breastfeeding moms occasionally causes symptoms in the breastfeeding baby such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea.
  • Babies of smoking mothers and fathers have a seven times greater chance of dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
  • Children of smoking parents have two to three times more visits to the doctor, usually from respiratory infections or allergy-related illnesses.
  • Children who are exposed to passive smoke in the home have lower blood levels of HDL, the good cholesterol that helps protect against coronary artery disease.
  • Children of smoking parents are more likely to become smokers themselves.
  • A recent study found that growing up in a home in which two parents smoked could double the child’s risk of lung cancer later in life.

How does does smoking affect breastfeeding?

Smoking has been linked to:

  • Earlier weaning. One study showed that the heaviest smokers tend to wean the earliest.
  • Lower milk production
  • Interference with milk let-down
  • Lower levels of prolactin. The hormone prolactin must be present for milk synthesis to occur.
  • One study (Laurberg 2004) indicated that smoking mothers who live in areas of mild to moderate iodine deficiency have less iodine in their breastmilk (needed for baby’s thyroid function) compared to nonsmoking mothers. The study authors suggested that breastfeeding mothers who smoke consider taking an iodine supplement.

Although smoking has been linked to milk production and let-down problems, this may be related to poor lactation management rather than physiological causes. Dr. Lisa Amir, in a review published in 2001, concluded that “Although there is consistent evidence that women who smoke breastfeed their infants for a shorter duration than non-smokers, the evidence for a physiological mechanism is not strong.”

How to minimize the risk to your baby if you smoke

  • The ideal: Stop smoking altogether.
  • Cut down. The less you smoke, the smaller the chance that difficulties will arise. The risks increase if you smoke more than 20 cigarettes per day.
  • Don’t smoke immediately before or during breastfeeding. It will inhibit let-down and is dangerous to your baby.
  • Smoke immediately after breastfeeding to cut down on the amount of nicotine in your milk during nursing. Wait as long as possible between smoking and nursing. It takes 95 minutes for half of the nicotine to be eliminated from your body.
  • Avoid smoking in the same room with your baby. Even better, smoke outside, away from your baby and other children. Don’t allow anyone else to smoke near your baby.
Sunshine257
by on Oct. 2, 2012 at 7:03 AM
I think it is sick and incredibly selfish of her. I am a smoker and I quit while I was pregnant. Smoking while holding children!?!? Tacky low selfish uncalled for ugh I could go on and on.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
cherinmichael
by on Oct. 2, 2012 at 7:16 AM
1 mom liked this
I remember hearing that if a mother smokes cigarettes while pregnant it was found to cause more problems for baby/child than a mother that did crack while pregnant. I guess it was a big study after there was such a big deal made over the "crack babies" of the 80s. That has to say something about how horrible smoking is.

Most of the babies/kids I know that had smoking parents have lots of health problems. Just something I don't understand. I understand it has to be hard to quit-but there is a lot at stake when it comes to this choice. I'd hate for my child to have asthma or be born premature because of something I did when pregnant.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
beco8627
by Bronze Member on Oct. 2, 2012 at 7:21 AM
2 moms liked this
I'm a very heavy smoker, and have been smoking for 15 years.....I was able to quit cold turkey as soon as I found out I was pregnant with my now 4.5 and 2.5 yr olds. It came easily to me for some reason. I did smoke right afterwards even when I was breastfeeding...I was told by the professionals that if smoke at least 2 hrs before a feeding, that the milk should be fine...I don't smoke in my home, in the family van where we haul the kids, and never around my children.
I do have a serious addiction...however, when it comes to my kids, I'm able to hold off until they're not around it...I just find it to be common sense in my opinion. I'm harming myself, but why on Earth would I subject my children to such harm??!
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
emmy526
by Silver Member on Oct. 2, 2012 at 7:32 AM

when i stopped smoking around my kids, they stopped getting sick with colds all the time, and so did i

atlmom2
by Ruby Member on Oct. 2, 2012 at 7:50 AM

The kid has breathing treatments.  Someone should take that child away.  It is neglect.  The kid could have asthma because the Mom smokes, probably does.  Very sad.  At least smoke outside totally away from kids and NEVER around them.  What a loser Mom. 

heidi749
by Ruby Member on Oct. 2, 2012 at 8:18 AM

 She is smoking way to much, she should at least try and cut back, if not quit, unfortunatly this is her choice, and you can tell her all the risks involved until you are blue in the face, but she is selfish about her habbit, and does not care about the effects it is having on her children obviously. 

It is not as easy to quit for some, as it is others, it is completly up to the individule if they truley WANT to QUIT or not, if they are not ready to, then they will make any excuse, as to why they can not, been there done that, thankfully I have quit with the help of Champix. 

 I know of no smoker that will quit, because of being pressured by others to quit, if they do, they start back up, and sometimes it will actually make them smoke more, since they are being told they should not, it is just the way some people are.

 Maybe with some luck, where she lives, it is ilegal to smoke in the vehical, if there is a child/children in the car. At least it is one less place she can smoke infront of her children, if it is like that.

 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)