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Introduction and needing work advice

Posted by on Dec. 27, 2012 at 1:18 PM
  • 15 Replies

My name is Martina. I have a 4 1/2 year old daughter and I rent space in a ladies house...who is raising the rent from 550-800 on the 1st of January. I have two part time jobs as it is. One working for a lawyer who rents space from another lawyer in the office. The other job I just started last weekend working as a hostess in a restaurant. I will be making roughly $350 a week with both jobs and that is not nearly enough to survive on especially with my rent being raised. Now, The office I work in, the other lawyer is about to fire their receptionist, the office manager asked if I was interested in the position. It's a full time postion. I'm a very motivated hard working person as long as I have work to do. The full time position also has full benefits. I want to work all three because I really really need the money...BAD, BUT the lady thinks it's impossible to work for both lawyers at the same time. I think I can do it, actually I know I can do it. It would be stressful, but It would be worth it. I would still have time for my daughter too.

I would totally leave one job for this, but the lawyer I work for now, I have known since I was a child and he is the best boss you could imagine. I lost a baby on November 1st of this year ( I was 6 months pregnant) and he was unbelievably understanding and was just there and supportive. He's great to say the least, so leaving him is no option for me because he has stuck by my side through all my ups and downs.

I need all the positions, but I have to make them believe I can do it too.

HELP!!

by on Dec. 27, 2012 at 1:18 PM
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Replies (1-10):
NearSeattleMom
by Gold Member on Dec. 27, 2012 at 3:17 PM

I don't see how you can work full-time for one lawyer and part-time for another lawyer and then also do a hostessing job.  Mainly because the hours for the full-time job would overlap with the hours for the part-tim legal job.

Do the lawyers share the space?  If they are in the same office, I can see how you might be able to do both jobs . . . the only way to know for sure if that would work for them would be to ask.

Good luck!  I hope things work out for you.

sabrtooth1
by on Dec. 27, 2012 at 3:23 PM

If the office manager of the full time position tells you she think's it's impossible to work for both lawyers, what she is REALLY saying is DO NOT DO IT.  In the first place, there would be too much temptation to try to work on the part-time job during the hours you are supposed to be working the full time job.  Second, it would be a conflict of interest.  If you need a third job, find one OUTSIDE of the office space, and working hours, of your full time job.

I do need to tell you tho, since my dd has been a legal secretary for 9 years, good law offices expect you to give your ALL to their practice.  Coming in early, and staying late is normal.  A receptionist is expected to help the secretaries whenever she has a spare minute, doing typing and filing.  You are NOT going to be just sitting there, pushing a button, and saying, "Doowe, Cheatum, and Howe, hold please."

mcr2008
by on Dec. 27, 2012 at 3:41 PM


Quoting NearSeattleMom:

I don't see how you can work full-time for one lawyer and part-time for another lawyer and then also do a hostessing job.  Mainly because the hours for the full-time job would overlap with the hours for the part-tim legal job.

Do the lawyers share the space?  If they are in the same office, I can see how you might be able to do both jobs . . . the only way to know for sure if that would work for them would be to ask.

Good luck!  I hope things work out for you.

Yes, they are both in the same office and the lawyer I already work for is very very slow, so I have lots of free time.

mcr2008
by on Dec. 27, 2012 at 3:51 PM


Quoting sabrtooth1:

If the office manager of the full time position tells you she think's it's impossible to work for both lawyers, what she is REALLY saying is DO NOT DO IT.  In the first place, there would be too much temptation to try to work on the part-time job during the hours you are supposed to be working the full time job.  Second, it would be a conflict of interest.  If you need a third job, find one OUTSIDE of the office space, and working hours, of your full time job.

I do need to tell you tho, since my dd has been a legal secretary for 9 years, good law offices expect you to give your ALL to their practice.  Coming in early, and staying late is normal.  A receptionist is expected to help the secretaries whenever she has a spare minute, doing typing and filing.  You are NOT going to be just sitting there, pushing a button, and saying, "Doowe, Cheatum, and Howe, hold please."

Oh I completely understand that. I have been here for about 6 months. I've watched the receptionist and understand that it's not just about pressing buttons and answering the phone, but I also see her with some free time also. The lawyer I currently work for is very understanding and very slow in business right now. I think he would be understanding of me trying to work both positions. He's always looking out for our best interest (my daughter's and mine). Also, the whole thing of getting a seperate 3rd job seems more challenging than just taking up the job in the same office due to the fact that the job at the restaurant will be different every week. My gut is telling me jump in and show them what I'm about because I'm a multi tasker at it's best, but a very little tiny spot is making me feel unsettled because the other girl says it's impossible. BUT she also thinks having one of her kids home for the holidays is way too much for her too, me on the other hand...I have my daughter full time, work 2 jobs, and also go to school and feel like I need more to do. I think writing down all the pros and cons would be best at this point.

sabrtooth1
by on Dec. 27, 2012 at 6:57 PM

<<<I also see her with some free time also>>>  You're not getting it.  Her "free time" is WHY SHE IS GETTING FIRED.  And it does not matter how understanding the PART time job is, it's about what the FULL TIME job expects.  They expect that during the hours you are working for them--you are ONLY working for THEM.  I was a supervisor, asst manager and manager of an insurance company for 15 years.  When employees were on my time, it was MINE.  It was NOT time to be on the phone, surfing the internet, selling Avon, volunteering for your kids' school, or doing your nails.  It was time to WORK FOR ME.  In between asnwering the phone, you find OTHER THINGS TO DO.  Whenever I look at you, I want to see you doing THIS COMPANY'S WORK.

If you want a career, if you want to be self supporting, this is how you make an employer value you, and offer you promotions and raises.  Listen to what you are being told.  Don't say, "Oh But..."  Don't assume you know more than your boss.  Keep yourself busy.  Take on more responsibility, but make sure you STILL do the original job wonderfully.  Work overtime without complaint.

gracieb3
by on Dec. 27, 2012 at 7:07 PM
1 mom liked this

Ask for what you need. See if they will give you a trial basis. I'm sure if you are upfront with the current good boss and explain your position that he won't mind trying to share you and in the event you can't swing both then I'd think him reasonable enough to let you go on good terms. If he is as caring as he sounds then he knows he can't offer you benefits and would not want to keep you from them. If you don't hang people out to dry they won't do it to you either. Do you know someone that could take your current job in the event you can't swing two? Having a back up plan to help out good people is helpful. If you really think you can swing all three jobs, go for it. My only concern comes from taking care of your little one and then if you are planning to add more children how you will fairly juggle all of this.

The first thing might be finding another place to live or asking current landlord to extend current rent rate for a few months as you can't afford the increase. If you have to move that is quite a hassle having a vacant place to rerent, the cost of advertising and in between tenant cleaning. Maybe they would be willing to work with you if you have been a long term, good renter. 

Sincere hugs for the baby loss and best wishes on future blessings, prayers too.

mcr2008
by on Dec. 28, 2012 at 9:35 AM


Quoting sabrtooth1:

<<>>  You're not getting it.  Her "free time" is WHY SHE IS GETTING FIRED.  And it does not matter how understanding the PART time job is, it's about what the FULL TIME job expects.  They expect that during the hours you are working for them--you are ONLY working for THEM.  I was a supervisor, asst manager and manager of an insurance company for 15 years.  When employees were on my time, it was MINE.  It was NOT time to be on the phone, surfing the internet, selling Avon, volunteering for your kids' school, or doing your nails.  It was time to WORK FOR ME.  In between asnwering the phone, you find OTHER THINGS TO DO.  Whenever I look at you, I want to see you doing THIS COMPANY'S WORK.

If you want a career, if you want to be self supporting, this is how you make an employer value you, and offer you promotions and raises.  Listen to what you are being told.  Don't say, "Oh But..."  Don't assume you know more than your boss.  Keep yourself busy.  Take on more responsibility, but make sure you STILL do the original job wonderfully.  Work overtime without complaint.

Oh no, I get it.Her free time is actually not why she is getting fired. She is getting fired because she has been late several times and has not called or shown up to work and she has only been here for 4 1/2 months and just took a two week vacation. The reason I know all of this is because I actually rent space from the office manager's house. So, I know everything about the office. I'm listening to what I'm told, BUT I also work alot harder and can handle a lot more than most people. I talked with Andy (the lawyer I work for already) and he said he would be more than willing to work it out because he doesn't want to let me go because of my work and he knows he cannot offer me more hours when I need it right now so he will work with me in any way that he can. I guess all I had to do was say something. The boss's, manager's, supervisor's, whatever you want to call them here are a little more caring than most. When they see you need help and they need help, they will work something out. They're not the typical boss. Thanks for the advice anyway.

furbabymum
by Bronze Member on Dec. 28, 2012 at 11:40 AM

 They might not want you working for multiple lawyers who are not in the same practice for confidentiality/conflict reasons. I work for 2 lawyers but they are in the same practice. We had a lawyer renting space from us and all I did for her was answer the phone. I couldn't help her with any legal work as she would often have a co-defendant to one of our defendants and that's just a conflict and problem waiting to happen. I could utter confidential information from one client to the other attorney without even realizing it. See what I'm saying?

Bmat
by Barb on Dec. 28, 2012 at 12:14 PM

Welcome, Martina!

It may be necessary to leave the lawyer you like so much to get the full time job- which may have benefits that a part time job doesn't. Perhaps the full time job as well as the hostess job.

mcr2008
by on Dec. 28, 2012 at 12:31 PM


Quoting furbabymum:

 They might not want you working for multiple lawyers who are not in the same practice for confidentiality/conflict reasons. I work for 2 lawyers but they are in the same practice. We had a lawyer renting space from us and all I did for her was answer the phone. I couldn't help her with any legal work as she would often have a co-defendant to one of our defendants and that's just a conflict and problem waiting to happen. I could utter confidential information from one client to the other attorney without even realizing it. See what I'm saying?


Oh yea. I could understand that. Thankfully both lawyers are on two completely different subjects. One is a divorce and one deals with the elderly and wills.

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