Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Advice for Moms Advice for Moms

Alarming Findings About What's Really in Fish: Is It Safe to Eat Anymore? Do you plan to cut back on how much fish you eat?

Posted by on Jan. 15, 2013 at 2:16 PM
  • 9 Replies

Alarming Findings About What's Really in Fish: Is It Safe to Eat Anymore? (VIDEO)

Posted by Maressa Brown on January 15, 2013 

fish dinnerFor years, we've known that tuna and even swordfish are more polluted with mercury than most seafood. And sure, knowing this has been a bummer for people who enjoy the occasional tuna salad sandwich or spicy tuna roll, but it really wasn't anything all that alarming. But now, new research has revealed a fact that anyone who likes to eat fish should find truly upsetting ... 84 percent of fish have unsafe levels of mercury, according to a study from the Biodiversity Research Institute in Maine and the International POPs Elimination Network. Ugh. This is no joke. It could have serious health implications for us.

But, okay, say you only really eat fish on Saturday nights when you go out for a hot date night with your honey ... or when it's on sale? So you should be safe -- for the most part -- right?

Not necessarily. The researchers warned:

Fish samples from around the world regularly demonstrate mercury concentrations exceeding human health advisory guidelines based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reference dose. Our findings demonstrate that 84 percent of the fish sampled were not safe for consumption for more than one meal per month.

Yup, more than once a month! They might as well say never eat it! So sad. Apparently, we've polluted our waters so much -- they say concentrations of mercury have increased approximately threefold as the result of us humans treating the planet like a trash dump -- that the majority of our fish may be too high in mercury to enjoy. Seriously, this is seriously heartbreaking for anyone who enjoys seafood.

Still, there are some fish that are better than others. According to MontereyBayAquarium.org's "The Super Green list" seafood list, the following fish contain low levels of contaminants, provide a daily minimum of omega-3s, and are classified as a Seafood Watch "Best Choice": Albacore tuna (troll- or pole-caught, from the U.S. or British Columbia); freshwater Coho salmon (farmed in tank systems, from the U.S.); oysters (farmed); Pacific sardines (wild-caught); rainbow Trout (farmed); salmon (wild-caught, from Alaska).

Ultimately, though, let's hope negotiators from more than 130 countries, who are working to finalize a treaty to reduce the use of mercury and limiting emissions into the environment, succeed. Because how sad would it be if we get to the point where fish is off the menu for good?

Here's the news report on the study ...

CLICK HERE FOR KHOU's REPORT

Video | News | Weather | Sports

Mon Jan 14 21:22:00 PST 2013

Study finds unsafe mercury levels in 84 percent of all fish

A new study from the Biodiversity Research Institute in Maine found that 84 percent of fish have unsafe levels of mercury. That poses a health risk for humans, exceeding the guidelines for eating certain kinds of fish more than once a month. view full article

 

How do you feel about this news? Do you plan to cut back on how much fish you eat?

by on Jan. 15, 2013 at 2:16 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-9):
PinkButterfly66
by Bronze Member on Jan. 15, 2013 at 3:01 PM

I thought it was albacore that had the highest levels of mercury, not the lowest.  Everything that I've read up until this post suggested that the chunk light tuna was safer to eat than albacore.  

PinkButterfly66
by Bronze Member on Jan. 15, 2013 at 3:03 PM

http://www.edf.org/oceans/mercury-alert-canned-tuna-safe-eat

How much canned tuna is safe to eat?

There are two main kinds of canned tuna: chunk light and solid or chunk white (albacore). Albacore is a larger species of tuna, with mercury levels almost three times higher than those of the smaller skipjack, which is used in most canned light tuna.

For this reason, parents should be especially mindful of their kids' tuna consumption. The recommendations below are based on EPA's guidance and current estimates of average mercury content in the two most popular types of canned tuna:

  • Canned white, or albacore (0.32 parts per million of mercury). Children up to age six can eat up to one 3-ounce portion a month; children ages 6–12, two 4.5-ounce portions a month. Adults, including pregnant women, can safely eat it up to three times a month (women, 6-ounce portions; men, 8-ounce portions). Luckily, some brands of canned or pouch albacore contain significantly less mercury than well-known national brands, since they use smaller, lower-mercury fish (see box).
  • Canned light — the safer choice (0.12 parts per million of mercury). Children up to age six can eat it up to three 3-ounce portions per month. Older children and adults can safely eat it once a week. But products labeled “gourmet” or “tonno” may contain mercury levels comparable to canned white, since they are made with bigger yellowfin tuna. Therefore, watch out for this label and eat it less often.
  • A better alternative to tuna is canned salmon(mostly sockeye or pink from Alaska), which is low in contaminants and high in heart-healthy omega-3s. It's also sustainably caught in Alaska and similarly priced, making it a great choice all-around.
AM-BRAT
by Amber on Jan. 15, 2013 at 4:46 PM
Grrrr.

We're pretty cheap anyway so not much fish bought. I likely won't change how little we already get. Do love it though, all of it!
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Cynthje
by on Jan. 15, 2013 at 10:17 PM

I love fish and i will continue to eat local caught fish at least twice a week, beef has hormones and abx in it, chicken has who knows what in it etc. if i was to follow all this stuff i would be stuck eating only the veggies i can grow in my own backyard

alexis_06
by AnnaLisa on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:29 AM

 yay! for the fresh(er) fish from british columbia!! (lol, that's where i live :)

alexis_06
by AnnaLisa on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:29 AM

 however, i barely eat fish as it is.  once in a blue moon is enough for me

acrogodess
by Bronze Member on Jan. 16, 2013 at 3:32 AM
S/o has a severe aversion to seafood. Even the smell of it cooking makes him gag and vomit, so the kids and I rarely have it to begin with.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
HappyFamily1234
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 9:18 AM

This is horrifing to me!  My little one loves fish and is one of his primary meat sources.  That and chicken.  We eat salmon or tilapia at least once a week.  We usually buy from costco which is pretty good on their meats. But, I'm going to have to check into where its coming from more closely.urh

LMenkes
by on Jan. 16, 2013 at 9:57 AM

Nope, we will continue our normal eating patterns. If we followed every new "finding" that someone decided to publish we wouldn't be able to survive between things leached in soil polluting plants, which pollute the animals which pollute us either way. Then on top of it all the things companies add to their products. There really is no way to get away from everything. Heck you could have hundreds of square miles of you own land and every time it rains it just brings in more pollutants. So I try to take everything with a rather large grain of salt, luckily not literally in this sense lol :)


Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN