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Hone School VS. Public School

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Poll

Question: Home School VS> Public School

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Home School

Public School


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Total Votes: 300

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I have a almost 5 year old and  I am trying to decide wether to put her into public school or to home school her. I am not sure about public schools right now with all the recent events. I mean you have all the shooting and not to long ago there was a 2nd grader raped by another one in the school bathroom. I am very nervouse about sending her to school. Plus the schools around here suck. We nolonge have a school district we can take our kids to any surrounding school. The only problem with that is then I willhave to drive her to and from school out of town and thats a  lot of gas, miles, and time on the road daily.  So I am looking to see what other people think. Thanks for your help all!!!

by on Jan. 25, 2013 at 1:12 PM
Replies (221-230):
StarLight23
by Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 4:03 PM

   Home-schooling was never an option for us either. My son was almost 3 when he was diagnosed with autism as well.  I agree. I could never have helped him as much as the support as the special educationclass and teachers did my son. He also had therapy at school too, so that was one more reason to send him to school.  Heck they even helped potty train him!

Sending my son to school was the best decision I ever made. He is mainstreamed into a regular first grade classroom with the exception of meals and breaks he needs. I am overall very happy with how he has progressed in 4 years!


Quoting Dora-rulz:

Both my kids are in public school. Homeschooling was never an option cause my dd was diagnosed w/ autism when she was two & I could never have helped her as much as the sp ed teachers & therapists. My ds is in kindergarten & loves it. Good luck making your decision.



TalulaBelleLove
by New Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 5:52 PM
We homeschool and Love it! No overcrowding No bullies No crazy amounts of homework No driving. Flexible schedule, advance at your own pace, homeschool play groups and field trips. We went through k12 online and found Georgia Cyber Academy it's a free online homeschool we went with and its great! They have ones for practically every state and you can use your own curriculum, purchase a premade one or do it through online. They (GCA)sent us a desktop computer all her books workbooks teaching guides and supplemental supplies free! You also havea teacher you can email or call whenever and once a month there is a clsss outing not to mention a boatload of field trips most if which are usually free and they allow you to include siblings, grandparents, friends, its totally whole family friendly!
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Cemommster
by on Jan. 27, 2013 at 6:16 PM
Quoting VanessaCB:


and you're just a bitch. And that's fine, I am sure you're just lacking somewhere.
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 6:23 PM


Homeschool isn't for everyone, but just to address a few of your concerns.

When my dd was in brick and mortar school, half of her lunch period was "silent" - there was only about 10 minutes to socialize.

Our co-ops do outside "recess" or "play dates" at local parks.

Music, art, and computer classes can all be outsourced if you aren't able to teach them yourself (by that I mean you can pay for lessons elsewhere).

Quoting jamiebell:

I've been considering homeschool but I can't help but think of the things they'd miss out on. For me I think of the little things, eating lunch everyday with friends, not only with family everyday. Recess, my son has made so many different friends and learned Awsome new games because of recess. Specials such as music art pe computer classes. I cam teach him about music and fitness and stuff on the computer but not to the extent when he has a whole class of peers to participate and extend the level of learning learn. I think of his class play he's doing now that he's so excited over. When they get rewarded for good behavior and get to have pj day and a movie. Sure I can do that at home but that's not as fun for him as it is when he's with 22 friends. He feels independent cuz he has his part of his life that is his. I feel torn cuz I see the benefits of what homeschool can do too. But there are things that he will miss out on not being in a public school and socialize in sports or church and such are not going to fulfill what areas I think my kid would miss out on. I'm not criticising either side as Im on the fence, these are just my own thoughts about where Im torn about it.


Quoting Isabelles_mommy:


You get the same opportunities in Homeschooling that you do when you go to a school. I don't understand why you think this. There are co-op classes homeschoolers can take, if there is something your unsure about teaching. Every class you can get at school can be taught in a home environment or through a co-op.

And if your thinking socialization, you get that with homeschool groups or sports interactions. Homeschoolers tend to socialize with every age from young to adult, instead of just kids their age and a teacher.  

Quoting Bmat:

I voted public school. I feel it is good for the children to have opportunities there that may not be available at home. Perhaps you could carpool with other parents. Having said this, it is very scary about the happenings in the schools. I think I'd volunteer in the school a lot.





I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














Monkeymama930
by on Jan. 27, 2013 at 6:29 PM
Private school I feel it's the best of both one on one attention and my son still gets to soc with kids his own age.
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fullxbusymom
by Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 7:27 PM
1 mom liked this

I would NEVER home school way to many down falls in my opinon.   We are in an amazing school district though ranked 5th in the entire US and we were ranked a Blue Ribbon School so I have no worries and have had amazing experiences with them.

buttersworth
by Bronze Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 7:39 PM

I live in Connecticut not very far from that recent tragedy. I wasn't nervous the day it happened, at least not right away, because my middle-schooler was on a field trip and nothing happened at her school. But a little bit into the day, I became nervous and called the school to make sure everything was ok, esp when her bus was late.

My dd would never want to be homeschooled. She's 12 and it's all about her friends. So I just pray that she remains safe, and for the most part, I think she will be. I'm also confident that if she were in a bad position, she'd be smart and be able to hide or protect herself becase she's intelligent.

That being said, I thought about home schooling her when she was an infant and looked into it, and decided I wanted her to enjoy being around other kids her age, which she wouldn't be having been home with me.

Now, I have two younger children not yet in school, and I am revisiting the whole home school idea for the same reasons. For whatever reason these heinous things are happening, however we think about it or whatever we hear about it, the bottom line is - these things are happening.  Whatever we think society should do to stop it, we have no control to single handedly make it stop. So how to protect them?

I'm begining to think the only way to ensure their safety is to home school. If schools are becomng that dangerous, what else should we do?

Other than that, I think schools are offering inferior education and have been for quite some time. The teachers are nice and the educators are well intentioned - and I mean in any school- but the formula for teaching and the curriculum are pretty standard everywhere. It doesn't seem like extra programs are helping. Wth all the extra programs designed to enhance the education for different learners and kids that need more help - the schools are just getting worse. Why that is, I can't say, but it jst goes to show that whatever they're doing , it's failing. Not more money can fix whatever public school has done.

Still, my only reason to not fully embrace homeschooling at this time is the social aspect, though it's less of a priority for me at this point, given current events.

 

buttersworth
by Bronze Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 7:48 PM

 

What do you think are the downfalls?

I'm just curious. When our daughter was starting school we moved to an area that had one of the top 5 schools. The teachers were outstanding. The parents of the district boasted. But slowly the real meaning of those kinds of statistics came to light, and I realized that those are just numbers. A 97% graduation rate doesn't mean much to me when the high school kids are overly materialistic, drive expensive cars gifted to them, look down on kids who don't have that, and have an uber sense of entitlement. Maybe that's not your neighborhood, but that was ours'. I found out the kids drank like fish in the upper grades (we aren't in those grades yet), and knowing parents around town I figured it was because they were all neo-yuppies who liked their evening cocktails, so an example was set. It was overall a horribly snobby town of upwardly mobile and transient types so the small town feel we thought we'd get there wasn't there. Now we've moved ironically, to an essentially wealthier town but the people are down to earth and the kids more relaxed. My daughter said she liked it better because no one here is sports obsessed or acheivement obsessed...which means she can continue being an A student like she wants, but there's no pressure when she herself doesn't need it. That's just my experience.

Quoting fullxbusymom:

I would NEVER home school way to many down falls in my opinon.   We are in an amazing school district though ranked 5th in the entire US and we were ranked a Blue Ribbon School so I have no worries and have had amazing experiences with them.


 

fullxbusymom
by Member on Jan. 27, 2013 at 9:36 PM
1 mom liked this

We have 100% graduation rate, no pregnant teens, amazing parents who parent there children.  Are some materialistic and have things handed to them of course what community doesn't have some, we are in an influential community and we are not influential my kids have never been looked down or picked on for it. Actually their friends opt to hang out here even though our house is 1/4 the size of most of theirs.

I have 2 in HS now so far zero issues with alcohol or drugs with my kids or anyone we are aware of.  Also have 1 on first amazing teachers small class sizes and teachers that are there for all the right reasons.  Are ratio is 17 kids w/ 1 teacher and 1 para so 8:1. 

For us as far as home schooling I would be doing my kids in injustice.  I am not qualified, they would not get as good of an education and I am one that likes them to live in the real world with real world experiences.  Not everything is going to be pleasant and not everyone will be nice they need to learn how to deal with things like this.  Make friends, be away from parents and become independent. I also don't feel most people who think they can homeschool truly can.

Quoting buttersworth:


What do you think are the downfalls?

I'm just curious. When our daughter was starting school we moved to an area that had one of the top 5 schools. The teachers were outstanding. The parents of the district boasted. But slowly the real meaning of those kinds of statistics came to light, and I realized that those are just numbers. A 97% graduation rate doesn't mean much to me when the high school kids are overly materialistic, drive expensive cars gifted to them, look down on kids who don't have that, and have an uber sense of entitlement. Maybe that's not your neighborhood, but that was ours'. I found out the kids drank like fish in the upper grades (we aren't in those grades yet), and knowing parents around town I figured it was because they were all neo-yuppies who liked their evening cocktails, so an example was set. It was overall a horribly snobby town of upwardly mobile and transient types so the small town feel we thought we'd get there wasn't there. Now we've moved ironically, to an essentially wealthier town but the people are down to earth and the kids more relaxed. My daughter said she liked it better because no one here is sports obsessed or acheivement obsessed...which means she can continue being an A student like she wants, but there's no pressure when she herself doesn't need it. That's just my experience.

Quoting fullxbusymom:

I would NEVER home school way to many down falls in my opinon.   We are in an amazing school district though ranked 5th in the entire US and we were ranked a Blue Ribbon School so I have no worries and have had amazing experiences with them.




thatgirl70
by Carin on Jan. 27, 2013 at 9:43 PM

Only you can decide that. I tried homeschooling my son this year (he's 5) so that we could focus on his therapies. I've realized that I'm really not cut out for it and he'll be going to school in the fall. If you feel you can homeschool (and sounds like you have a good reason for it), by all means, do it. I mean even though it's not working out for us, doesn't mean that I'm not a big supporter of it. You just have to do what's right for your family.

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