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How to grow a garden? (piog)

Posted by on Feb. 12, 2013 at 1:34 PM
  • 15 Replies
1 mom liked this

We are going to actually till up some land this year to plant a small garden of veggies.  I would like some fruit as well.  I would like a blueberry bush, but hubby doesn't like them :(  So, we may plant blackberries instead.  Anyway.....do you have any helpful hints for us?  We live in the south and our summers are very HOT!  Tomatoes grow so well and we usually do them in a pot.  

Here are the veggies we would like to grow:
Tomatoes
Cucumbers
Yellow Squash
Bell Pepper
Red Pepper
Carrots
Peas or Green Beans

Blackberries
Strawberries

How would we start a compost pile and how would we keep it up?  

Thanks for all your help! 

by on Feb. 12, 2013 at 1:34 PM
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Matriarch87
by on Feb. 12, 2013 at 1:42 PM
2 moms liked this

My husband isn't very traditional nd our garden is amazing!  

He uses carpet!  or chem-lite material...

We till the area and lay a roll of old junk carpet fiber side down.  Then we tak a pocket knife and cut 2 sides of a triangle into the carpet and tuck the flap under in every spot we want a plant to grow.   The slits dont need to be very big, just large enough for a plant to comnfortably sprout up through.  

Then he either plants his baby plants, or pokes his seed in the dirt and covers'em up.  

We grow 20 different kinds of peppers, 2 kinds of tomatoes, 2 kinds of sweet corn, garlic, onion, cucumbers and a few kinds of melons.  He uses recycled tires to hold up the tomato plants as they grow as well as tomato cages.  He waters pretty much all day.  We dont use any fertilizers or bug sprays of any kind.  There is no need to weed because the carpet prevents anything from choking the plants.  Thats the beauty of the carpet, it eliminates the shittiest thing about having a garden.  All we do is water and harvest.  

We also have grape vines, green and purple ones, we have a pear tree, a cherry tree and a walnut tree.  All of these are self sustaining, we do almost nothing to them and they just come back every year.  

So my main tip would be; Carpet your garden : ) 


rHOPEb
by Silver Member on Feb. 12, 2013 at 2:27 PM
1 mom liked this

That is AWESOME!  Thank you! :D

Quoting Matriarch87:

My husband isn't very traditional nd our garden is amazing!  

He uses carpet!  or chem-lite material...

We till the area and lay a roll of old junk carpet fiber side down.  Then we tak a pocket knife and cut 2 sides of a triangle into the carpet and tuck the flap under in every spot we want a plant to grow.   The slits dont need to be very big, just large enough for a plant to comnfortably sprout up through.  

Then he either plants his baby plants, or pokes his seed in the dirt and covers'em up.  

We grow 20 different kinds of peppers, 2 kinds of tomatoes, 2 kinds of sweet corn, garlic, onion, cucumbers and a few kinds of melons.  He uses recycled tires to hold up the tomato plants as they grow as well as tomato cages.  He waters pretty much all day.  We dont use any fertilizers or bug sprays of any kind.  There is no need to weed because the carpet prevents anything from choking the plants.  Thats the beauty of the carpet, it eliminates the shittiest thing about having a garden.  All we do is water and harvest.  

We also have grape vines, green and purple ones, we have a pear tree, a cherry tree and a walnut tree.  All of these are self sustaining, we do almost nothing to them and they just come back every year.  

So my main tip would be; Carpet your garden : ) 


Matriarch87
by on Feb. 12, 2013 at 2:31 PM
2 moms liked this

Oh and also the carpet is awesome for really hot places because it absorbs and holds onto moisture longer...so once you have stopped watering the sun doesnt immediately dry everything out.  The carpet will release moisture into the ground for several hours after the watering has stopped before the sun crispifies it all again.  

itsallabtthem84
by on Feb. 13, 2013 at 8:41 AM
Bump for you because I have not ever done a garden or have a yard.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
LoreleiSieja
by on Feb. 13, 2013 at 11:04 AM
2 moms liked this

The carpet is a fine idea for mulching the garden, but doesn't answer the original question - how to build a compost pile.

Composting is a great way to add nutrients back into the soil.  There are many many ways to do this! I will mention a few, but you can find entire books on composting at the library!

1) anerobic compost.  This is easy, but smelly.  This means "without air".  You would use a plastic garbage can with a lid to make this compost.  I don't recommend it, but some people love it.  You layer your vegetable waste, leaves, grass, etc, into a garbage can and put on a lid.  Wait about a year, and it's all composted. But if you have to open the lid to add more material, the slimy smell with knock you out. Yuck!

2) aerobic compost: This is done out in the open. Usually some sort of bin is built, either with wire fencing, or wood slats, no bottom, no top.  You layer stuff into the bin, evenly - not humped up in the middle.  You layer green stuff and dry stuff.  Never put anything in the bin that was animal in nature.  No bones, no meat scraps, no milk, no cheese, no eggs.  Only plants and plant waste.  You can add kitchen waste- like carrot peelings, potato peels, wilted lettuce, cooked peas, coffee grounds, orange rinds, etc.  You can use grass clippings, fall leaves, hay, etc.  You alternate green (moist) stuff with dry stuff.  Let the rain fall on it.  Periodically, stir it up or scoop it into another bin.  Some people have created a real science out of this.  The middle of the bin should get very hot. In colder climates, you can actually see steam rise off the bin during a cool morning.  The compost is ready when it has broken down, when it no longer looks like grass clippings and kitchen waste, but like crumbly dark earth.  

3) gargen method.  The people who created the Troy-bilt rototillers developed a method of improving the soil while gardening.  They would plant a solid garden of peas early in the season.  No rows - just a wide patch of solid peas.  Pick them two or three times when ripe, but before the plants die back, till them under and plant a solid patch of green beans.  Again, no rows.  Just plant them solid.  Pick them two or three times.  Up north, you'd till them under and plant corn there next spring.  In the south, sometimes you can plant a third rotation - solid peas again.  Then after picking them a few times, till them under and plant winter rye to protect the garden through the winter.  Till the rye under in the spring, and plant your corn.  This easy method is great for improving poor soils, but costs a lot in seed.  I would plant  $20 of pea seeds, buing the seeds in bulk! 

4) vermiculture compost: Briefly, this method you raise red worms in special bins.  You bury your kitchen waste in the worm bins, and they "eat" the refuse, and return nutrients to the bin that you can add directly to your garden.  My brother's school does this! The kids help feed their lunch left-overs to the worms, and the compost gets added to the school garden.  You can google this for more detailed information.  

Composting can be a great enterprise, and very rewarding. But if not done right, it can be smelly, and lure garden pests (racoons) to your back yard.

Onemiracle
by on Feb. 13, 2013 at 11:13 AM
1 mom liked this

Starting a compost pile is pretty simple.  Since you mentioned tiling land, i am guessing you have some space... so it is a pretty simple matter.

Here is a great article on composting:

http://www.yankeemagazine.com/issues/2011-07/interact/10things/compost-methods

Our compost bins look like a big 4x4 foot crate that are missing some slats.  Next to it we keep a old trash can filled with soil.  Toss in some leaves, then top with soil, add a layer of food waste (veggies only!), and give it a toss.  When it gets about half full... we move it to the second bin... and keep tossing.  Faster than you think, it breaks down - and is great for the garden soil.

Good luck with the blackberries, give them a corner to go craze and you might end up with a nice patch  of fruity brambles. 

marisab
by on Feb. 13, 2013 at 11:19 AM

BUMP!

ceciliam
by Cecilia on Feb. 13, 2013 at 12:23 PM

I'm curious.....wouldn't carpeting cause chemicals to leech into the ground? I'm always looking for new techniques and this sounds interesting.

Quoting rHOPEb:

That is AWESOME!  Thank you! :D

Quoting Matriarch87:

My husband isn't very traditional nd our garden is amazing!  

He uses carpet!  or chem-lite material...

We till the area and lay a roll of old junk carpet fiber side down.  Then we tak a pocket knife and cut 2 sides of a triangle into the carpet and tuck the flap under in every spot we want a plant to grow.   The slits dont need to be very big, just large enough for a plant to comnfortably sprout up through.  

Then he either plants his baby plants, or pokes his seed in the dirt and covers'em up.  

We grow 20 different kinds of peppers, 2 kinds of tomatoes, 2 kinds of sweet corn, garlic, onion, cucumbers and a few kinds of melons.  He uses recycled tires to hold up the tomato plants as they grow as well as tomato cages.  He waters pretty much all day.  We dont use any fertilizers or bug sprays of any kind.  There is no need to weed because the carpet prevents anything from choking the plants.  Thats the beauty of the carpet, it eliminates the shittiest thing about having a garden.  All we do is water and harvest.  

We also have grape vines, green and purple ones, we have a pear tree, a cherry tree and a walnut tree.  All of these are self sustaining, we do almost nothing to them and they just come back every year.  

So my main tip would be; Carpet your garden : ) 



la_bella_vita
by Gold Member on Feb. 13, 2013 at 3:07 PM

 My husband does all the gardening, lol

gblossom
by on Feb. 13, 2013 at 3:14 PM

BUMP! Someone answer this because I was wondering the same thing!!! Sounds like a good technique but I'm curious if there is adverse effects.


Quoting ceciliam:

I'm curious.....wouldn't carpeting cause chemicals to leech into the ground? I'm always looking for new techniques and this sounds interesting.

Quoting rHOPEb:

That is AWESOME!  Thank you! :D

Quoting Matriarch87:

My husband isn't very traditional nd our garden is amazing!  

He uses carpet!  or chem-lite material...

We till the area and lay a roll of old junk carpet fiber side down.  Then we tak a pocket knife and cut 2 sides of a triangle into the carpet and tuck the flap under in every spot we want a plant to grow.   The slits dont need to be very big, just large enough for a plant to comnfortably sprout up through.  

Then he either plants his baby plants, or pokes his seed in the dirt and covers'em up.  

We grow 20 different kinds of peppers, 2 kinds of tomatoes, 2 kinds of sweet corn, garlic, onion, cucumbers and a few kinds of melons.  He uses recycled tires to hold up the tomato plants as they grow as well as tomato cages.  He waters pretty much all day.  We dont use any fertilizers or bug sprays of any kind.  There is no need to weed because the carpet prevents anything from choking the plants.  Thats the beauty of the carpet, it eliminates the shittiest thing about having a garden.  All we do is water and harvest.  

We also have grape vines, green and purple ones, we have a pear tree, a cherry tree and a walnut tree.  All of these are self sustaining, we do almost nothing to them and they just come back every year.  

So my main tip would be; Carpet your garden : ) 





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