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If you choose not to BF, and your child gets a disease that could have been prevented ...

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I'm not bashing anyone, or trying to cause fights, so lets respect each other's answers... I would just like a conversation started  where people share their thoughts and opinions on this topic...

I'll start out by saying this: My father was bottle fed after he got really ill, almost died, and the shock to my grandmother's system made her dry up. I was bottle fed too and so was my sibling. However I choose to BF my LO because I feel that I can protect her against diseases like diabetes, acute appendicitis, rheumatoid arthritis, inguinal hernia and ploric stenosis, to name a few.

So my question is this: If you choose not to BF and in 10, 20, 30, 40 years your DD or DS got diagnosed with an illness that is life changing, would you like to turn back the years and BF as it would reduce your child's risk to this disease or do you think your child won't get it, or do you think your child will get it no matter what you do today?


Edit:

Firstly I would like to thank everyone that shared their stories. I'm sorry to hear about so many children that is affected by diabetes. I chose diabetes as an example because I was diagnosed with GD that didn't go away and stayed after my daughter was born. There is no family history of diabetes, across family where my grandfather was one of 18 children and my other grandfather one of 11, so I have a huge family. I'm not overweight. I've always eaten healthy food, loved salad and vegetables  etc and yet, now I'm diabetic. 

So my reason for asking was not to make people feel like their parenting choices were bad or that breastfeeding is better or to make moms feel like failures or that they should blame themselves. I'm trying to figure out WHAT on earth LED to MY illness. As a mom I would most definitely go back and redo something I did wrong if I had the means to do so. We all do our best, but we all want a do over.

The illnesses that I quoted in my original question was what I researched on the web. Not something I sucked out of my thumb. And just to clarify AGAIN, I'm not accusing anybody. I was ff. I read a lot of interesting answers that made me think. I need people to challenge my thoughts so that I can push myself further into trying to understand this condition. BECAUSE I AM DIABETIC, my child has a risk of being diabetic. I'm allowed to ask questions without having to be insulted. Trust me if I wanted to insult mothers, you would know about it.

I do believe that breastfeeding reduces your child's risk to these diseases and others thats not mentioned. I don't however said that it would PREVENT them from getting it. So please don't misquote me.


by on Feb. 18, 2013 at 4:18 AM
Replies (141-150):
dragongirl1012
by on Feb. 20, 2013 at 6:39 PM

You can support any "fact" if you use the right study group.

soontobemomof2k
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 2:41 PM

Im actually pretty annoyed you included diabetes in this. My daughter is 4 and has it and she was formula fed. There is absolutely no way breast feeding could've prevented it. If your kid has the genetic makeup for it, its going to happen. GD has nothing to do with a history of Type 1 (which is what kids would have) You might just have the genetic make up for diabetes. Also, a history of OTHER auto immune disorders such as celiacs, lupus, thyroid disorders, can make a child pre disposed to an autoimmune disease. My mother, and both of her parents have thyroid disorders so that is where the drs believe her diabetes came from .Now from me not breastfeeding. 

You are a type 2 diabetic most likely?,  although Iguess you could be type 1 depending on how your pancreas works... but GD, and then getting diabetes after  doesn't make your child at risk for type 1 (childhood). And I have to say its really not the worst thing in the world. 

My daughter would've gotten it regardless. Breastfeeding does not have anything to do with how well pancreases (?)  work. I believe the drs. Formula did not kill my daughters pancreas

On another note... Do  you take insulin?


Quoting MoeksieNature:

I'm not bashing anyone, or trying to cause fights, so lets respect each other's answers... I would just like a conversation started  where people share their thoughts and opinions on this topic...

I'll start out by saying this: My father was bottle fed after he got really ill, almost died, and the shock to my grandmother's system made her dry up. I was bottle fed too and so was my sibling. However I choose to BF my LO because I feel that I can protect her against diseases like diabetes, acute appendicitis, rheumatoid arthritis, inguinal hernia and ploric stenosis, to name a few.

So my question is this: If you choose not to BF and in 10, 20, 30, 40 years your DD or DS got diagnosed with an illness that is life changing, would you like to turn back the years and BF as it would reduce your child's risk to this disease or do you think your child won't get it, or do you think your child will get it no matter what you do today?


Edit:

Firstly I would like to thank everyone that shared their stories. I'm sorry to hear about so many children that is affected by diabetes. I chose diabetes as an example because I was diagnosed with GD that didn't go away and stayed after my daughter was born. There is no family history of diabetes, across family where my grandfather was one of 18 children and my other grandfather one of 11, so I have a huge family. I'm not overweight. I've always eaten healthy food, loved salad and vegetables  etc and yet, now I'm diabetic. 

So my reason for asking was not to make people feel like their parenting choices were bad or that breastfeeding is better or to make moms feel like failures or that they should blame themselves. I'm trying to figure out WHAT on earth LED to MY illness. As a mom I would most definitely go back and redo something I did wrong if I had the means to do so. We all do our best, but we all want a do over.

The illnesses that I quoted in my original question was what I researched on the web. Not something I sucked out of my thumb. And just to clarify AGAIN, I'm not accusing anybody. I was ff. I read a lot of interesting answers that made me think. I need people to challenge my thoughts so that I can push myself further into trying to understand this condition. BECAUSE I AM DIABETIC, my child has a risk of being diabetic. I'm allowed to ask questions without having to be insulted. Trust me if I wanted to insult mothers, you would know about it.

I do believe that breastfeeding reduces your child's risk to these diseases and others thats not mentioned. I don't however said that it would PREVENT them from getting it. So please don't misquote me.




soontobemomof2k
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 2:42 PM


Thats a bunch of bull, sorry

Quoting Randi02:


Logo of revobgynLink to Publisher's site
Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Fall; 2(4): 222–231.
PMCID: PMC2812877

The Risks of Not Breastfeeding for Mothers and Infants

Health outcomes in developed countries differ substantially for mothers and infants who formula feed compared with those who breastfeed. For infants, not being breastfed is associated with an increased incidence of infectious morbidity, as well as elevated risks of childhood obesity, type 1 and type 2 diabetes, leukemia, and sudden infant death syndrome. For mothers, failure to breastfeed is associated with an increased incidence of premenopausal breast cancer, ovarian cancer, retained gestational weight gain, type 2 diabetes, myocardial infarction, and the metabolic syndrome. Obstetricians are uniquely positioned to counsel mothers about the health impact of breastfeeding and to ensure that mothers and infants receive appropriate, evidence-based care, starting at birth.

Health outcomes differ substantially for mothers and infants who formula feed compared with those who breastfeed, even in developed countries such as the United States. A recent meta-analysis by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality reviewed this evidence in detail1:

  • For infants, not being breastfed is associated with an increased incidence of infectious morbidity, including otitis media, gastroenteritis, and pneumonia, as well as elevated risks of childhood obesity, type 1 and type 2 diabetes, leukemia, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
  • Among premature infants, not receiving breast milk is associated with an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).
  • For mothers, failure to breastfeed is associated with an increased incidence of premenopausal breast cancer, ovarian cancer, retained gestational weight gain, type 2 diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome.

These findings suggest that infant feeding is an important modifiable risk factor for disease for both mothers and infants. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) therefore recommends 6 months of exclusive breastfeeding for all infants.2 The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)3 and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP)4 similarly recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life, continuing at least through the infant’s first birthday, and as long thereafter as is mutually desired. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends at least 2 years of breastfeeding for all infants.

In the United States, breastfeeding durations fall far short of these guidelines.5 In 2005, 74.2% of US infants were breastfed at least once after delivery, but only 31.5% were exclusively breastfed at age 3 months, and just 11.9% were exclusively breastfed at age 6 months. These rates show considerable regional variation, with the highest rates in the Pacific Northwest and the lowest rates in the Southeast. Although some of this variation reflects cultural differences, recent data suggest that variations in hospital practices account for a considerable proportion of disparities in breastfeeding duration.6 This suggests that improvements in the quality of antenatal and perinatal support for breastfeeding could have a substantial impact on the health of mothers and infants.

This article reviews the health risks of not breastfeeding, for infants and for mothers, as well as the obstetrician’s role in counseling women regarding infant feeding and ensuring an optimal start for breastfeeding at birth.


The Risks of Formula Feeding Versus the Benefits of Breastfeeding

Public health campaigns and medical literature have traditionally described the “benefits of breastfeeding,” comparing health outcomes among breastfed infants against a reference group of formula-fed infants. Although mathematically synonymous with reporting the “risk of not breastfeeding,” this approach implicitly defines formula feeding as the norm. As several authors have noted,79 this subtle distinction impacts public perceptions of infant feeding. If “breast is best,” then formula is implicitly “good” or “normal.” This distinction was underscored by national survey data showing that, in 2003, whereas 74.3% of US residents disagreed with the statement: “Infant formula is as good as breast milk,” just 24.4% agreed with the statement: “Feeding a baby formula instead of breast milk increases the chance the baby will get sick.”10

These distinctions appear to influence parents’ feeding decisions. In 2002, the Ad Council conducted focus groups to develop the National Breastfeeding Awareness Campaign, targeted at reproductive-aged women who would not normally breastfeed. They found that women who were advised about the “benefits of breastfeeding” viewed lactation as a “bonus,” like a multivitamin, that was helpful but not essential for infant health. Women responded differently when the same data were presented as the “risk of not breastfeeding,” and they were far more likely to say that they would breastfeed their infants. Given these findings, this review will present differences in health outcomes as risks of formula feeding, using breastfeeding mother-infant dyads as the referent group.




soontobemomof2k
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 2:44 PM


type 1 or 2?

Quoting achorney:

For the record, I was a breasted baby and I do have diabetes. And I am getting my undergrad in biochemistry. I am not just some troll.



soontobemomof2k
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 2:45 PM

EXACTLY my daughters case. No family history of diabetes and at 1 1/2 she was diagnosed with it. She was exposed to coxsackie at that age which one of her drs said brought it out. 


Quoting Remy11:

There are many people who get the diseases that you mentioned that were breast fed.. Yes BF is best but not a cure all .. Also many people get diabetes with no risk factors and no family history.. The fact that you were bottle fed probably had nothing to do with it and more to do with things your body has been exposed to since then.



soontobemomof2k
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 2:48 PM

Its people eating shitty foods and being lazy and getting TYPE 2, not type 1


Quoting MoeksieNature:

I'm sorry to hear that your children got affected by diabetes. I would just like to add that I never said that bottle feeding causes diabetes, however there is an astounding rise in diabetes across the world, and I'm merely interested in seeing what other moms have to say. Thanks for sharing.

Quoting DaniandTom:

OK I have no idea where you got the idea that breastfeeding prevented diabetes! I BF my daughter for a year and at age 5 she got diabetes. Same with my second son, although he developed it at age 24. (type 1--insulin dependant diabetes NOT type 2 that is caused by lifestyle) I bottle fed my first son but he didn't develop diabetes. So...explain that! LOL 

Breast feeding is preferable IF YOU CAN AND WANT TO. However, if you choose to bottle feed or if you cannot for whatever reason BF, then your baby will be fine. There is NO EVIDENCE whatsoever that Bottle feeding causes diabetes or anything else! To suggest something like that is just silly.




soontobemomof2k
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 2:52 PM


Please listen to me when I say that breastfeeding will not prevent your kid from getting TYPE 1 diabetes if they are prone to it, carry the gene, etc. NOTHING WILL STOP IT FROM COMING OUT!

Quoting MoeksieNature:

Thanks for calling me ignorant, I do not believe I am though. My answer to your statement, aren't you glad that you did breastfeed him, in my eyes, you did what you could, even with the unfurtuanate outcome. I'm sorry to hear about your son. I'm not making light of Diabetes, Diabetes IS my main inspiration to continue to breastfeed. I'll expand on this when I add an edit on my question.

Quoting Jadegirl1819:

I think you are ignorant about the kind of diseases you are talking about.

FYI, I breastfed and my son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was 19 months old.   


Quoting MoeksieNature:

So for argument sake lets say your child gets type 1 diabetes, would you not wonder if it is something that could have been prevented? I know there isn't a lot of evidence going around, so I'm just curious. What if in 20 years time there is hard evidence that BFing could have prevented your child from developing Type 1 diabetes? Would you like to have a do over?

Quoting MrsRobinson06:

No because I believe they would have gotten the disease regardless of how they were fed at infancy. If you're meant to have a disease when you're older it will still happen.







soontobemomof2k
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 2:57 PM


Right, my daughter was diagnosed after getting coxsackie. It does sometimes show after trauma on the body

Quoting justinnaimee:

One of my best friends has type 1. She was breastfed. Her dr told her evidence is pointing to type 1 being caused by traumatic illness. She was diagnosed a few month after a severe kidney stone when she was 8.

Quoting MoeksieNature:

So for argument sake lets say your child gets type 1 diabetes, would you not wonder if it is something that could have been prevented? I know there isn't a lot of evidence going around, so I'm just curious. What if in 20 years time there is hard evidence that BFing could have prevented your child from developing Type 1 diabetes? Would you like to have a do over?

Quoting MrsRobinson06:

No because I believe they would have gotten the disease regardless of how they were fed at infancy. If you're meant to have a disease when you're older it will still happen.




Megan11587
by Bronze Member on Feb. 21, 2013 at 2:59 PM

Well said.

Quoting -PB:

 I don't think there is any point in beating oneself up over what one could have or should have done.  I think breastfeeding is awesome but its not a guarantee that your child will never get certain diseases.  Diseases usually have multiple contributing factors and breastfeeding is just a small addition to a list of things for prevention.


soontobemomof2k
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 3:03 PM


I've lived through it for 3 years too now. my daughter was 17 months old. I wouldn't call it living through the horror.. thats a little extreme. You also shouldn't need to give your child insulin every 2-4 hours at night. What insulins is your child on. I get up every 2 hours to check my daughter at night and I still dont consider it horrible or a burden. I wish she didn't have it but I'm so glad she doesn't have cancer or something worse.

Quoting Runrunmommy:

I breastfeeding my ds1 for 14 months and he was Dxd with type 1 diabetes at 25 months. I was shocked and thought my extended nursing would have prevented this disease. The truth is, no one has figured out why my lo a cause has t1d. Maybe it's in our genes, maybe it was a virus attacking his body, etc..I can't be naive and think that breastfeeding alone will protect my current nursling. I've got to give vitamins, stay current on shots, and be the best mom to my kids. My hubby and I lived thru the horror for three years already of having to give our baby insulin to keep him alive every two to four hour around the clock. It sucks and it has nothing to do with breastfeeding or not breastfeeding.



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