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all he wants to do is eat!!

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OK, so my son is a little under 2 weeks old and all he wants to do is eat. Between breast milk and formula he eats way more than the Dr has recommended. But what am I suppose to do? He cries every hour to an hour and a half wanting to eat and he acts like he's really hungry. How ami suppose to deny him food because its too soon? Also, when he eats he can eat more in a sitting than the Dr has recommended also. I don't want my baby to start out with a weight problem. I feel like I'm feeding him all day and night and he's never satisfied. I've heard giving him rice cereal in his bottle but isn't he too young for that? I just don't know what to do is I'm over feeding this baby.
by on Feb. 18, 2013 at 7:30 AM
Replies (291-300):
jjohovich
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 1:27 PM

I am very sorry that you have had this experience although, it is wonderful that it was not cancerous.  I hope that you have healed and do not have any issues in the future. And I have read a few different articles/research that estimate the rate of "primary insufficient lactation" at around 5%. I can't paste links for some reason but google Marianne Neifert. 

And, you are very right, formula has come a very long way.  And it of course can be a life-saving option for many babies. However, that doesn't change the fact that formula is linked to some serious short and long term health issues.  We are learning more and more everyday about the health consequences of all sorts of things that are commonly used. I think it is important to discuss these things openly and honestly. I think that many important conversations are avoided out of this need to "not judge others" or "make people feel bad or guilty". No one that is truly interested in supporting and educating mothers about breastfeeding would advocate attacking someone personally about a choice to use formula. Sometimes the truth can be difficult to talk about, though, but it is really critical and the only way that positive change can happen. 

You have no reason to feel guilty. You had an extraordinary situation and did what what you had to do to feed your baby. There will always be a need for an alternative to actual breastfeeding and in addition to advocating for breastfeeding we need to also raise awareness on the options when a mom can't breastfeed her baby herself. Formula is an important tool for situations such as yours. And with the increase in donor milk programs and milk banks, donor milk is becoming more available as a healthier alternative to formula for many babies. And also hold formula companies accountable for the part they play in woman "choosing" to formula feed as well as for the content of the product itself.  And we need to also insist that medical professionals educate themselves on brestfeeding so they are providing correct information and evidence-based advice to moms and familes.  Many woman with health problems are not provided with adequate support or information on their medical condition - this can lead to delays in treatment or a delay in providing the child with treatment. And many of the "booby traps" are based on incorrect information by professionals that are ill/misinfomred or in the pockets of formua companies.  

Quoting ericahager2005:

WI was one of the 5% you speak of who couldn't produce milk. Mine was due to breast surgery (lumpectomy and reduction I was a 38g b4 surgery because I had so many lumps, many in milk ducts) thankfully no cancer but I did have alot of abnormal cells aka borderline pre-cancer.

Breast is best, laleche and all those groups are wonderful supports for moms choosing breastfeeding. Where did you get that statistic, btw? I think formula has come a long way, its not perfect but to call it a very distant 2nd makes moms who choose formula due to medical reasons or where a necessary medication harmful to a baby leeches into breastmilk then formula its a safer choice. Don't put moms down for making the choice best for their family.

I hope op hangs in there too but hope that no one puts her in a position where she's made to feel guilty for her choices.


Quoting jjohovich:

Please contact a lactaction consultant certified through the IBLCE (an IBCLC) to discuss your concerns and your breastfeeding challenges. And kellymom.com is a great resource for breastfeeding information.  There are also a bunch of facebook support groups that you can join and get some fabulous advice and sipport from other moms so you can acheive an exclusively breastfeeding relationship. Although it is possible that you aren't producing enough milk it is incredibly rare - like 5% of woman rare. The bigger issue and the "booby trap" is that when you feed formula you are almost assuredly decreasing your supply. It can happen very fast. However, it sounds that you are just misinterpreting your newborns normal behavior as meaning he is starving to death.  Newborns nurse all the time! All day and all night. You cannot nurse your baby on a schedule. As others have mentioned, these first 6 or so weeks is when your supply is being created. And it is also incredibly improtant to understand that breastfeeding - nursing - is not only about calories! It serves a very important biological and developmental purpose that goes beyond just food. I know that it is hard, and it can be a lot to wrap your head and life around, motherhood is very demanding, but your baby is counting on you.  Breastfeeding is really important. Formula may be the next best thing but it is a very, very distant second. There are some real consequences, short and long term, to formula feeding. And, honestly, the more you feed formula, the less milk you will produce. It is that simple. Pumping is a very poor indicator of how much milk your baby is getting while nursing. Babies are significantly better at "milking" your breast than a pump. And, many pediatricians are not educated or trained regarding breastfeeding. The most important thing is to feed on demand, even if that seems like all the time. As long as he is gaining weight (breastfed babies gain slower than formula fed babies, this is normal and healthy) and is making 6-8 wet diapers a day he is getting enough milk. Good luck to you, momma! Hang in there - these early days are the hardes but the most critical. You can do it! 




RainyDayMom78
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 3:09 PM

 

In general babies do not binge. Although it is rare a child can be have an underdevolped valve (the full sensor). This will cause the baby to feel hungry past the point of being full, that is what happened w/my daughter. She was completely healthy otherwise and I would not have been concerned, though she started throwing up after feeding too much or it was a rather large spitup. I was told that is normal to continue to feed on demand, but did notice she was always hungry, I mean I would feed her (empty both sides) and not even 30 mins later she wanted more... and plus while burping large amounts of spitup and then she started doing the projectile stuff that really concerned me I demanded she be checked before her reg. check up. I am so glad I did because when they looked into it, checked for gerd... well they found out a part of her stomache was not fully developed, just a small little thing that sends the message to our brain to let us know to stop eating so we don't overfill our stomache which could be very dangerous and burst the belly.

She is now a healthy 10yr old and yes we have had to deal w/her weight issues all her life. There are times she would go up and down depending on a growth spurt that is normal. But her weight has always been in the 90+ percentile. I have to really watch her portion sizes- we don't do junk food and she is very active.... the sad part is that though she sometimes feel like she is full, it is very hard for her to sense that she is full and I have to say okay that is enough. And she is legitametly hungry, all I can do is offer water. When she tells me, mom I am full, those are the best words, but for whatever reason the switch is not turned on all the time. So at our house we focus on nutrition and healthy eating habbits, I teach her to read labels and teach her the foods that are okay to have more than plenty off (i.e. fresh fruits & veggies). But because I can not be with her all the time, she gets food that is not okayed and well eats a little too much, w/out realizing it. Fortunately she is starting to learn what is an acceptable portion size for her and to stop looking at her "skinny" friends that stuff themselves w/junk food she can't have. It is hard but she is happy and comes up w/great healthy alternatives for herself and to share w/her friends.


 

Quoting NYChicago:

No. Babies don't know how to binge. He might be growing a little faster than average. Has he been checked for infant acid reflux? My niece had it, and she was the same way, always wanting to nurse but then would cry. The milk is soothing at the time, but once the digestive process starts, the acid burns their tummies.


 

tharealty2
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 4:00 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting HuggaBug1991:

 

Quoting tharealty2:


Quoting HuggaBug1991:

 Rice cereal in the bottle is a good idea, it will make him feel fuller (it's not to early I started my dd on cereal when she was 1wk old) Also if that doesn't help/work, just give him a bottle of water.

Please do not offer any more advice like this^^^^ its wrong from the first word to the period.  Its so wrong I almost assumed you must be a troll.  This is the very opposite of good advice.

 I guess I should clarify and say i am only offering advice that my PED. advised me to do! And again with the water, I didn't mean like a whole 8oz of water I meant about an 1oz or less. If you don't like the idea of cereal in the bottle then don't do it, I did with both my babes and it was a life saver! But you can also make very......um....milked-down (thin) cereal and give it by spoon!  Almost everybody on here is always assuming instead of thinking straight! ( I don't mean you, I have had alot of people say mean and nasty things about me and my parenting/mothering style!)

water shouldn't be given before 6 mos and many say wait longer, period, rice cereal is not good at all really but at 1wk - omg!!  If getting baby full is your only goal then heck - give em fried chicken.  If doing what is best for baby - no cereal!!  And if you are bfding - the best thing for you and baby, is to ONLY breastfeed, and to do it on demand; especially in the first few months. No parent is perfect and we all make mistakes or do things with out realizing its not good, and unfortunately it doesn't help that so many ped's give out equally horrible advice - but giving newborns cereal, however watered down - is horrible.  I don't think it makes anyone a bad parent, just uninformed - and God knows I sure don't know it all.  my oldest is 16 years old, my youngest 11 mos and believe me when I say there have been plenty things I did out've ignorance that I'm so glad I know not to do now - and thats what its all about, live and learn.  But once you know better, do better.  We should recognize not everything done in the past is good to do now just bc 'we lived', that can be applied to everything,. think of car seats, lol - whne I was baby - I certainly was not put in a car seat - but no one would argue that they're not necessary or preferrable now.

Mrs.Cullen2010
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 5:05 PM
1 mom liked this

Do not listen to people who tell you to make your baby wait an hour or 2 to eat. When breastfeeding, he will eat and he will snack and sometimes he just wants to use you as a pacifier..I went thru it with my daughter..she's almost 8 months now. And also, how do you know you're not producing enough? Because your baby can suck out a lot more than you can pump. If you have any questions about that, you should call your local lactation consultant..they will tell you the same thing and any other questions you may have. And yes supplementing between formula and BM could be upsetting his stomach.


Always BF on demand. It can take up to 6 weeks for you to get a routine down. And even then you might not...all babies are different. Just hang in there and remember you're not alone! 

ericahager2005
by Member on Feb. 21, 2013 at 5:42 PM
1 mom liked this
I totally agree with what you're saying. My major issue is many issues moms face that make it contraindicated to breastfeed, such as meds unsafe for baby getting into milk. Yes sometimes there are safer meds for those moms, sometimes not.

I agree 110% about formula co's my doula said to get extra samples and coupons tell tem you plan to breastfeed exclusively when you fill out the card for free diaper bags and they will bombard you with formula checks, coupons and samples, that is a practice I disagree with....how about giving that mom a breast pump and bottles and bags for it.........

Right after dd was off formula I found out about the breastmilk banking program, donation program. Dunno about safety issues, ie allergies, etc but what a cool option.



Quoting jjohovich:

I am very sorry that you have had this experience although, it is wonderful that it was not cancerous.  I hope that you have healed and do not have any issues in the future. And I have read a few different articles/research that estimate the rate of "primary insufficient lactation" at around 5%. I can't paste links for some reason but google Marianne Neifert. 

And, you are very right, formula has come a very long way.  And it of course can be a life-saving option for many babies. However, that doesn't change the fact that formula is linked to some serious short and long term health issues.  We are learning more and more everyday about the health consequences of all sorts of things that are commonly used. I think it is important to discuss these things openly and honestly. I think that many important conversations are avoided out of this need to "not judge others" or "make people feel bad or guilty". No one that is truly interested in supporting and educating mothers about breastfeeding would advocate attacking someone personally about a choice to use formula. Sometimes the truth can be difficult to talk about, though, but it is really critical and the only way that positive change can happen. 

You have no reason to feel guilty. You had an extraordinary situation and did what what you had to do to feed your baby. There will always be a need for an alternative to actual breastfeeding and in addition to advocating for breastfeeding we need to also raise awareness on the options when a mom can't breastfeed her baby herself. Formula is an important tool for situations such as yours. And with the increase in donor milk programs and milk banks, donor milk is becoming more available as a healthier alternative to formula for many babies. And also hold formula companies accountable for the part they play in woman "choosing" to formula feed as well as for the content of the product itself.  And we need to also insist that medical professionals educate themselves on brestfeeding so they are providing correct information and evidence-based advice to moms and familes.  Many woman with health problems are not provided with adequate support or information on their medical condition - this can lead to delays in treatment or a delay in providing the child with treatment. And many of the "booby traps" are based on incorrect information by professionals that are ill/misinfomred or in the pockets of formua companies.  


Quoting ericahager2005:

WI was one of the 5% you speak of who couldn't produce milk. Mine was due to breast surgery (lumpectomy and reduction I was a 38g b4 surgery because I had so many lumps, many in milk ducts) thankfully no cancer but I did have alot of abnormal cells aka borderline pre-cancer.



Breast is best, laleche and all those groups are wonderful supports for moms choosing breastfeeding. Where did you get that statistic, btw? I think formula has come a long way, its not perfect but to call it a very distant 2nd makes moms who choose formula due to medical reasons or where a necessary medication harmful to a baby leeches into breastmilk then formula its a safer choice. Don't put moms down for making the choice best for their family.



I hope op hangs in there too but hope that no one puts her in a position where she's made to feel guilty for her choices.





Quoting jjohovich:

Please contact a lactaction consultant certified through the IBLCE (an IBCLC) to discuss your concerns and your breastfeeding challenges. And kellymom.com is a great resource for breastfeeding information.  There are also a bunch of facebook support groups that you can join and get some fabulous advice and sipport from other moms so you can acheive an exclusively breastfeeding relationship. Although it is possible that you aren't producing enough milk it is incredibly rare - like 5% of woman rare. The bigger issue and the "booby trap" is that when you feed formula you are almost assuredly decreasing your supply. It can happen very fast. However, it sounds that you are just misinterpreting your newborns normal behavior as meaning he is starving to death.  Newborns nurse all the time! All day and all night. You cannot nurse your baby on a schedule. As others have mentioned, these first 6 or so weeks is when your supply is being created. And it is also incredibly improtant to understand that breastfeeding - nursing - is not only about calories! It serves a very important biological and developmental purpose that goes beyond just food. I know that it is hard, and it can be a lot to wrap your head and life around, motherhood is very demanding, but your baby is counting on you.  Breastfeeding is really important. Formula may be the next best thing but it is a very, very distant second. There are some real consequences, short and long term, to formula feeding. And, honestly, the more you feed formula, the less milk you will produce. It is that simple. Pumping is a very poor indicator of how much milk your baby is getting while nursing. Babies are significantly better at "milking" your breast than a pump. And, many pediatricians are not educated or trained regarding breastfeeding. The most important thing is to feed on demand, even if that seems like all the time. As long as he is gaining weight (breastfed babies gain slower than formula fed babies, this is normal and healthy) and is making 6-8 wet diapers a day he is getting enough milk. Good luck to you, momma! Hang in there - these early days are the hardes but the most critical. You can do it! 







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artistic_kitty
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 9:07 PM

Stop the formula if you have any plans to continue breast feeding. Breast milk is supply and demand, if you don't let him eat then you wont produce. Don't worry about what the doctor said. Some doctors still aren't great with dealing with a breast feeding mother. There is no such thing as over feeding a baby that young. If he wants to eat then let him nurse. There is no real way of knowing exactly how much he's getting from you anyways. If he was a bigger baby at birth (like mine) then he may need more than what you currently can produce at this time. Which is why you need to let him just eat and eventually it will all even out. Don't lose faith. You're the mom and you will know what it best for your child.

03amanda
by on Feb. 22, 2013 at 9:52 AM

When I tried to pump I only pump an  half  oz that's not normal i was told and my family doesn't make enough milk for our babies

hippiecrit
by on Feb. 23, 2013 at 11:58 AM

It is not uncommon for a newborn to spend all his time at the breast, but cereal or any other food will fill his belly with stuff his body cannot process yet and keep him from getting the nutrients he needs right now. In a few more weeks he will leave the breast more often, but it's not a problem even if he's nursing for comfort right now. I don't think a newborn really can overeat.

1/2 oz is a meal for a newborn, I had abundant milk and never pumped more than that in the first month or two. If you supplement your breastmilk, you will produce less. If you let him nurse when he's not "getting anything", your body will compensate by increasing milk production within 24 hours. Be sure to get enough water to drink. Also- you should know that your baby has the instinct to suck in just the right ways to stimulate milk production. Your breast pump has so such instincts, and so at 8 months old, my son can always get what he needs, but it takes a lot longer (and sometimes multiple collections) to get even a three oz bottle together for him when I'm leaving him for a few hours.

Do you have a sister or friend who has breastfed who can help you? If not, your local WIC clinic will have a lactation consultant you could discuss all of this with. Good luck.


melanielmcgee
by on Feb. 24, 2013 at 6:40 AM
I'm a mom of 4. This is great advise.


Quoting rockinmomto2:

First of all, you're not overfeeding. IMO, stop formula all together and just give breastmilk. Every hour or hour and a half is totally normal for a newborn. He's trying to not only regulate your breastmilk (the more he eats, the more you produce), but he's trying to regulate himself as well. He's only been alive for two WEEKS. Throw the clocks away and feed on demand. It's also impossible to overfeed a baby. He will eat when he's hungry and not eat when he's not hungry.


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shortyali
by New Member on Feb. 24, 2013 at 9:03 AM
Normal pump output is .5-2ozs total, both breast combined. Your output was normal. Also pumps are not an indicator of supply. Babies diaper output is the only indicator. 6-8 diaper changes a day. You can go to kellymom.com to confirm this if you want more information.

Quoting 03amanda:

When I tried to pump I only pump an  half  oz that's not normal i was told and my family doesn't make enough milk for our babies

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