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Handwriting without tears

Posted by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:01 PM
  • 11 Replies

Am thinking about purchasing this to help my 6 year old HFA son (who has some fine motor delays) practice his writing. 

He knows his letters ans can read fluently at a 4th grade level, even though he is only in 1st but has horrible letter formation, they are all different sizes, some are still backward, he doesn't use lowercase/ uppercase properly and the spacing between words is horrible.... Soeverysentancelooks like this. Lol! 

Has any one used this? Is it easy to use? Is it a simple program to learn? Did your child do well with it? 

Any information would be helpful. 

Thanks! 

by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:01 PM
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Replies (1-10):
jackiewal10
by Gold Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:04 PM

I haven't used it, but I would say go for it.  It can't hurt.  But also know that the way he writes (backwards letters, not uniform, etc.) is still very common for his age, especially as a boy.  

PinkParadox
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:07 PM
have you tried the writing paper with grooves? Writing backwards is still common at this age. My daughter stopped during second grade. Also, try giving him a popsicle stick to use for spacing. Trying the program couldn't hurt...but there are other options.
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newmom1313
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:09 PM

I teach students who have HFA, and I use this program in my classroom.  It works!!  Although the things you ar seeing are age appropriate, this program can prevent issues from lasting longer than 'normal'.

frndlyfn
by Platinum Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:10 PM

What do you mean grooves?  Bumps that lift up on the paper?   We have the handwriting paper from dollar tree for dd to practice writing which has the 3 lines.... 2 solid lines with a dotted line in the middle.


Quoting PinkParadox:

have you tried the writing paper with grooves? Writing backwards is still common at this age. My daughter stopped during second grade. Also, try giving him a popsicle stick to use for spacing. Trying the program couldn't hurt...but there are other options.



PinkParadox
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:12 PM
1 mom liked this
Yes. It looks like regular writing paper that you described...but the top/bottom lines are raised...and the dotted line is just barely raised. You can find it at WalMart :)

Quoting frndlyfn:

What do you mean grooves?  Bumps that lift up on the paper?   We have the handwriting paper from dollar tree for dd to practice writing which has the 3 lines.... 2 solid lines with a dotted line in the middle.



Quoting PinkParadox:

have you tried the writing paper with grooves? Writing backwards is still common at this age. My daughter stopped during second grade. Also, try giving him a popsicle stick to use for spacing. Trying the program couldn't hurt...but there are other options.




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SamMom912
by Silver Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:20 PM


Yes, i do know that it is age appropriate. But, he is soo easily frustrated that I am hoping that the faster we solve the problems, the more comfortable he will get with writing and expressing himself. 

They are teaching him to keyboard at school (and i am at home as well) but the handwritng and homework has been such a sore spot.... Im thinking we just need a better way... Thanks! 

Quoting jackiewal10:

I haven't used it, but I would say go for it.  It can't hurt.  But also know that the way he writes (backwards letters, not uniform, etc.) is still very common for his age, especially as a boy.  



frndlyfn
by Platinum Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:23 PM

Thank you.  I will have to see if i can find it for dd as well.  She can write in a straight line but still has mismatched sizes for letters ha ha.


Quoting PinkParadox:

Yes. It looks like regular writing paper that you described...but the top/bottom lines are raised...and the dotted line is just barely raised. You can find it at WalMart :)

Quoting frndlyfn:

What do you mean grooves?  Bumps that lift up on the paper?   We have the handwriting paper from dollar tree for dd to practice writing which has the 3 lines.... 2 solid lines with a dotted line in the middle.



Quoting PinkParadox:

have you tried the writing paper with grooves? Writing backwards is still common at this age. My daughter stopped during second grade. Also, try giving him a popsicle stick to use for spacing. Trying the program couldn't hurt...but there are other options.






MamaSnaps
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:24 PM

My daughter had some fine motor skills issues when she was little and we made a few adaptations for her-HUGE pencils helped a LOT. A squishy ball that she could exercise her hand with made a huge difference in the control she had over writing. 

I haven't heard of what you are looking at, but I know I'd have tried about anything at that point, so I probably would have jumped on it. 
Is he getting OT at school for this? We had a great occupational therapist at our school at the time and working with her also made a great difference.  

thatgirl70
by Carin on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:26 PM

They use it with my son at therapy. The program is fairly expensive, but there is an app they have out that you can get called Wet Dry Try. I think maybe I paid $5 for it to use on my iPad.

SamMom912
by Silver Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:27 PM


Yes, o/t 2xs a week. P/t 2xs a week too. 

I like this big pencils too. At first, i thought golf pencils were the way to go... Really small to fit in his hand. I love the idea of the squichy ball. Will def. get one of those. We try to do plato and other things like that, but he is sensory avoidant.. So, many of those are just icky for him. 

Quoting MamaSnaps:

My daughter had some fine motor skills issues when she was little and we made a few adaptations for her-HUGE pencils helped a LOT. A squishy ball that she could exercise her hand with made a huge difference in the control she had over writing. 

I haven't heard of what you are looking at, but I know I'd have tried about anything at that point, so I probably would have jumped on it. 
Is he getting OT at school for this? We had a great occupational therapist at our school at the time and working with her also made a great difference.  



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