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Should i be worried?

Posted by on Jul. 20, 2013 at 8:38 PM
  • 17 Replies
My almost 15 month old grandson is barely talking. Its difficult for me to be objective. He only says ma ma, mum and da da. He is very happy and to make a long story short, very smart. He has met all other milestones and no difficulties with hearing.
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by on Jul. 20, 2013 at 8:38 PM
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Replies (1-10):
frndlyfn
by Platinum Member on Jul. 20, 2013 at 8:47 PM

Whoever is his main parent/guardian can take him for an evaluation but that sounds pretty typical for a 15 month old.  How often is he read to?  Does everyone hold conversations with him even though they are one sided?

JMmama
by Member on Jul. 20, 2013 at 8:55 PM
1 mom liked this
Sometimes if kids develop quickly in one area, other areas are slower to develop. If he is communicating I wouldn't be worried about word counts.
BeccaJoy622
by on Jul. 20, 2013 at 10:41 PM
Did they do that Baby Sign Language with him? I've heard that when they're given alternative methods of communication, speech gets put on the back burner. Maybe going forward if he points to whatever it is he needs/wants, or uses sign language, emphasize the word he would normally use. For example, if he points to his sippy say, "would you like your *sippy*?" And if he nods say, "yes?" And then proceed to hand it to him. I'm no expert by any means but if I were in that situation that's what I would do. Good luck!
JTE11
by Bronze Member on Jul. 20, 2013 at 11:14 PM
1 mom liked this


I can honestly say that baby signing doesn't slow down speech, it just helps the kid avoid frustration while they are learning more words, by giving them a way to communicate in the meantime. If, however, people use signs only and don't pair the spoken word with the sign every time one is used then yes, that would slow down the speech progress. I just saw your response and thought it was a really good suggestion to talk directly to the child as you said, and to use the word for what he is pointing to (like the sippy), I just wanted to reassure OP that baby signs don't slow down speech progress unless the signs are used without the spoken words. In ten years of working with infants and toddlers I have seen baby signs jump-start speech many times, but that's only if they are used correctly. :)

Quoting BeccaJoy622:

Did they do that Baby Sign Language with him? I've heard that when they're given alternative methods of communication, speech gets put on the back burner. Maybe going forward if he points to whatever it is he needs/wants, or uses sign language, emphasize the word he would normally use. For example, if he points to his sippy say, "would you like your *sippy*?" And if he nods say, "yes?" And then proceed to hand it to him. I'm no expert by any means but if I were in that situation that's what I would do. Good luck!



snowiscold
by on Jul. 20, 2013 at 11:42 PM
1 mom liked this

My nephew is 19 months old and just in the last two to three months has he started to talk.  He literally went from making sounds to saying mama, dada, nana (for banana), etc.  He is only saying one word sentences at this point but I'm sure he'll be expanding his sentences within the next few weeks.  This is an exciting time for kids of this age.  I wouldn't worry at this point :-)

terpmama
by Bronze Member on Jul. 20, 2013 at 11:50 PM



Quoting JTE11:


I can honestly say that baby signing doesn't slow down speech, it just helps the kid avoid frustration while they are learning more words, by giving them a way to communicate in the meantime. If, however, people use signs only and don't pair the spoken word with the sign every time one is used then yes, that would slow down the speech progress. I just saw your response and thought it was a really good suggestion to talk directly to the child as you said, and to use the word for what he is pointing to (like the sippy), I just wanted to reassure OP that baby signs don't slow down speech progress unless the signs are used without the spoken words. In ten years of working with infants and toddlers I have seen baby signs jump-start speech many times, but that's only if they are used correctly. :)

Quoting BeccaJoy622:

Did they do that Baby Sign Language with him? I've heard that when they're given alternative methods of communication, speech gets put on the back burner. Maybe going forward if he points to whatever it is he needs/wants, or uses sign language, emphasize the word he would normally use. For example, if he points to his sippy say, "would you like your *sippy*?" And if he nods say, "yes?" And then proceed to hand it to him. I'm no expert by any means but if I were in that situation that's what I would do. Good luck!




Signing has actually been shown to increase vocabulary and reading and math skills ... Just FYI.


BeccaJoy622
by on Jul. 21, 2013 at 12:00 AM
Yes, when properly taught. JTE11 said it perfectly; if you don't pair the sign (the right one, that is) with a word then the child is discouraged from speaking. Teaching any second language is beneficial, especially at an early age. Like I said I'm no expert, but I do speak French fluently and have been teaching it to my daughter. I absolutely believe in teaching sign language as long as English is accompanied with it.


Quoting terpmama:




Quoting JTE11:


I can honestly say that baby signing doesn't slow down speech, it just helps the kid avoid frustration while they are learning more words, by giving them a way to communicate in the meantime. If, however, people use signs only and don't pair the spoken word with the sign every time one is used then yes, that would slow down the speech progress. I just saw your response and thought it was a really good suggestion to talk directly to the child as you said, and to use the word for what he is pointing to (like the sippy), I just wanted to reassure OP that baby signs don't slow down speech progress unless the signs are used without the spoken words. In ten years of working with infants and toddlers I have seen baby signs jump-start speech many times, but that's only if they are used correctly. :)


Quoting BeccaJoy622:

Did they do that Baby Sign Language with him? I've heard that when they're given alternative methods of communication, speech gets put on the back burner. Maybe going forward if he points to whatever it is he needs/wants, or uses sign language, emphasize the word he would normally use. For example, if he points to his sippy say, "would you like your *sippy*?" And if he nods say, "yes?" And then proceed to hand it to him. I'm no expert by any means but if I were in that situation that's what I would do. Good luck!







Signing has actually been shown to increase vocabulary and reading and math skills ... Just FYI.



terpmama
by Bronze Member on Jul. 21, 2013 at 12:12 AM


And I'm saying that any language taught fully (whether paired with English or not) will benefit kids. Deaf parents don't stress about English because asl is a fully capable language. While there is benefit to asl in that you can teach two languages simultaneously (though attempting to really does a grammatical disservice to both as they do not share grammar and are completely separate languages) it does not stunt vocabulary or development. 

Quoting BeccaJoy622:

Yes, when properly taught. JTE11 said it perfectly; if you don't pair the sign (the right one, that is) with a word then the child is discouraged from speaking. Teaching any second language is beneficial, especially at an early age. Like I said I'm no expert, but I do speak French fluently and have been teaching it to my daughter. I absolutely believe in teaching sign language as long as English is accompanied with it.


Quoting terpmama:




Quoting JTE11:


I can honestly say that baby signing doesn't slow down speech, it just helps the kid avoid frustration while they are learning more words, by giving them a way to communicate in the meantime. If, however, people use signs only and don't pair the spoken word with the sign every time one is used then yes, that would slow down the speech progress. I just saw your response and thought it was a really good suggestion to talk directly to the child as you said, and to use the word for what he is pointing to (like the sippy), I just wanted to reassure OP that baby signs don't slow down speech progress unless the signs are used without the spoken words. In ten years of working with infants and toddlers I have seen baby signs jump-start speech many times, but that's only if they are used correctly. :)


Quoting BeccaJoy622:

Did they do that Baby Sign Language with him? I've heard that when they're given alternative methods of communication, speech gets put on the back burner. Maybe going forward if he points to whatever it is he needs/wants, or uses sign language, emphasize the word he would normally use. For example, if he points to his sippy say, "would you like your *sippy*?" And if he nods say, "yes?" And then proceed to hand it to him. I'm no expert by any means but if I were in that situation that's what I would do. Good luck!







Signing has actually been shown to increase vocabulary and reading and math skills ... Just FYI.





Firenygirl180
by Member on Jul. 21, 2013 at 12:17 AM
1 mom liked this
My son didn't really start talking until 18 months. Now at 2 years he learns 3-5 words a day.

He knows some signs and i plan to start teaching him the abc's in sign language soon.

BeccaJoy622
by on Jul. 21, 2013 at 12:22 AM
I sense a little hostility here. Just curious, why are you taking such offense?


Quoting terpmama:


And I'm saying that any language taught fully (whether paired with English or not) will benefit kids. Deaf parents don't stress about English because asl is a fully capable language. While there is benefit to asl in that you can teach two languages simultaneously (though attempting to really does a grammatical disservice to both as they do not share grammar and are completely separate languages) it does not stunt vocabulary or development. 


Quoting BeccaJoy622:

Yes, when properly taught. JTE11 said it perfectly; if you don't pair the sign (the right one, that is) with a word then the child is discouraged from speaking. Teaching any second language is beneficial, especially at an early age. Like I said I'm no expert, but I do speak French fluently and have been teaching it to my daughter. I absolutely believe in teaching sign language as long as English is accompanied with it.





Quoting terpmama:





Quoting JTE11:


I can honestly say that baby signing doesn't slow down speech, it just helps the kid avoid frustration while they are learning more words, by giving them a way to communicate in the meantime. If, however, people use signs only and don't pair the spoken word with the sign every time one is used then yes, that would slow down the speech progress. I just saw your response and thought it was a really good suggestion to talk directly to the child as you said, and to use the word for what he is pointing to (like the sippy), I just wanted to reassure OP that baby signs don't slow down speech progress unless the signs are used without the spoken words. In ten years of working with infants and toddlers I have seen baby signs jump-start speech many times, but that's only if they are used correctly. :)



Quoting BeccaJoy622:

Did they do that Baby Sign Language with him? I've heard that when they're given alternative methods of communication, speech gets put on the back burner. Maybe going forward if he points to whatever it is he needs/wants, or uses sign language, emphasize the word he would normally use. For example, if he points to his sippy say, "would you like your *sippy*?" And if he nods say, "yes?" And then proceed to hand it to him. I'm no expert by any means but if I were in that situation that's what I would do. Good luck!










Signing has actually been shown to increase vocabulary and reading and math skills ... Just FYI.








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