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Olympic Sports?

Posted by on Feb. 16, 2014 at 2:40 PM
  • 62 Replies
I was watching curling earlier and it made me wonder how it came about. And the skeleton. How did throwing yourself onto a sled and bombing down a track become not only a sport, but an Olympic one? I'm glad they did but it's sort of amusing.
Are there any events that make you wonder?
by on Feb. 16, 2014 at 2:40 PM
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highlandmum
by Member on Feb. 16, 2014 at 4:39 PM
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Mine is the Skelton and the two man luge.  For the two man luge I picture two guys standing at the top going.  "Hey, I have an idea.  We only have one sled to get down.  Why don't you get on the sled and I will get on top."

for the Skelton it was "you know what would be fun?  If I launch myself down this bobsleigh hill at 80 mile per hour, head first." 

SweetLuci
by Silver Member on Feb. 16, 2014 at 5:23 PM

     bouncing

Quoting highlandmum:

Mine is the Skelton and the two man luge.  For the two man luge I picture two guys standing at the top going.  "Hey, I have an idea.  We only have one sled to get down.  Why don't you get on the sled and I will get on top."

for the Skelton it was "you know what would be fun?  If I launch myself down this bobsleigh hill at 80 mile per hour, head first." 

 

SweetLuci
by Silver Member on Feb. 16, 2014 at 5:28 PM
1 mom liked this

 Dh & I were wondering the same thing as we were watching the skelton...and where did that name come from? So I looked it up and this is what I found

Skeleton is a fast winter sliding sport in which a person rides a small sled down a frozen track while lying face down, during which the rider experiences forces up to 5 g and reaches speeds over 130 km/h (80 mph) The sport was named from the bony appearance of the sled. It was added to the Olympic program for the 2002 Winter Olympics; previously, it had been in the Olympic program only in St. Moritz, Switzerland, in 1928 and 1948.
The sport of skeleton can be traced to 1882, when English soldiers constructed a toboggan track between the towns of Davos and Klosters. While toboggan tracks were not uncommon at the time, the added challenge of curves and bends in the Swiss track distinguished it from those of Canada and the United States.
 
Approximately 30 km (20 mi) away in the winter sports town of St. Moritz, British men had long enjoyed racing one another down the busy, winding streets of the town, causing an uproar among citizens because of the danger to pedestrians and visiting tourists. In 1884, Major William Bulpett, with the backing of winter sports pioneer and Kulm hotel owner Caspar Badrutt, constructed Cresta Run, the first sledding track of its kind in St. Moritz. The track ran three-quarters of a mile from St. Moritz to Celerina and contained ten turns still used today. When the Winter Olympic Games were held at St. Moritz in 1928 and 1948, the Cresta Run was included in the program, marking the only two times skeleton was included as an Olympic event before its permanent addition in 2002 to the Winter Games. 
In the 1887 Grand National competition in St. Moritz, a Mr. Cornish introduced the now-traditional head-first position, a trend that was in full force by the 1890 Grand National.

SarahSuzyQ
by Bronze Member on Feb. 16, 2014 at 9:22 PM
1 mom liked this
Yeah, the whole luge setup is definitely odd... I love this theory, though! I do have a picture of my son and husband sharing a sled, but with my son on Daddy's back. Not quite the same thing!

Quoting highlandmum:

Mine is the Skelton and the two man luge.  For the two man luge I picture two guys standing at the top going.  "Hey, I have an idea.  We only have one sled to get down.  Why don't you get on the sled and I will get on top."

for the Skelton it was "you know what would be fun?  If I launch myself down this bobsleigh hill at 80 mile per hour, head first." 

graycalico
by on Feb. 17, 2014 at 9:41 AM
I didn't realize it dated so far back!

Quoting SweetLuci:

 Dh & I were wondering the same thing as we were watching the skelton...and where did that name come from? So I looked it up and this is what I found


Skeleton is a fast winter sliding sport in which a person rides a small sled down a frozen track while lying face down, during which the rider experiences forces up to 5 g and reaches speeds over 130 km/h (80 mph) The sport was named from the bony appearance of the sled. It was added to the Olympic program for the 2002 Winter Olympics; previously, it had been in the Olympic program only in St. Moritz, Switzerland, in 1928 and 1948.
The sport of skeleton can be traced to 1882, when English soldiers constructed a toboggan track between the towns of Davos and Klosters. While toboggan tracks were not uncommon at the time, the added challenge of curves and bends in the Swiss track distinguished it from those of Canada and the United States.
 
Approximately 30 km (20 mi) away in the winter sports town of St. Moritz, British men had long enjoyed racing one another down the busy, winding streets of the town, causing an uproar among citizens because of the danger to pedestrians and visiting tourists. In 1884, Major William Bulpett, with the backing of winter sports pioneer and Kulm hotel owner Caspar Badrutt, constructed Cresta Run, the first sledding track of its kind in St. Moritz. The track ran three-quarters of a mile from St. Moritz to Celerina and contained ten turns still used today. When the Winter Olympic Games were held at St. Moritz in 1928 and 1948, the Cresta Run was included in the program, marking the only two times skeleton was included as an Olympic event before its permanent addition in 2002 to the Winter Games. 
In the 1887 Grand National competition in St. Moritz, a Mr. Cornish introduced the now-traditional head-first position, a trend that was in full force by the 1890 Grand National.

graycalico
by on Feb. 17, 2014 at 9:41 AM
Haha! Yes.

Quoting highlandmum:

Mine is the Skelton and the two man luge.  For the two man luge I picture two guys standing at the top going.  "Hey, I have an idea.  We only have one sled to get down.  Why don't you get on the sled and I will get on top."

for the Skelton it was "you know what would be fun?  If I launch myself down this bobsleigh hill at 80 mile per hour, head first." 

chattycassie
by Member on Feb. 17, 2014 at 10:07 AM

 In the summer Olympics I always wondered about ribbon dancing. I don't think it is there anymore (I did not see it if it was last time) but I always wondered how do they think of that?

graycalico
by on Feb. 17, 2014 at 10:13 AM
It's fun to watch! And the hula hoop one. Lol. How did they become Olympics worthy.

Quoting chattycassie:

 In the summer Olympics I always wondered about ribbon dancing. I don't think it is there anymore (I did not see it if it was last time) but I always wondered how do they think of that?

graycalico
by on Feb. 17, 2014 at 10:13 AM
It's fun to watch! And the hula hoop one. Lol. How did they become Olympics worthy.

Quoting chattycassie:

 In the summer Olympics I always wondered about ribbon dancing. I don't think it is there anymore (I did not see it if it was last time) but I always wondered how do they think of that?

othermom
by Silver Member on Feb. 17, 2014 at 10:49 AM

I don't know

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