Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Pros and cons of being a teacher?

Posted by on Oct. 26, 2015 at 11:56 AM
  • 25 Replies

I am thinking about becoming certified to teach. I want to teach elementary. Anyone who is a teacher or has been a teacher, I'd like to know your opinions of the pros and cons to this profession.

by on Oct. 26, 2015 at 11:56 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
WILDCATGAL78
by Silver Member on Oct. 26, 2015 at 12:06 PM
1 mom liked this

I am not a teacher but I do come from a family of educators (all my aunts and mom are teachers as well as several cousins and my brother). I work for the school district and when my husband retires from the military, I was thinking about going back to teaching. 

Pros: You only work about 190 days out of the school year. You get all sorts of breaks throughout the school year as well as Summer, Spring and Winter break.  Everyday is different, you get to teach and watch young minds learn and grow. It's an opportunity to make a difference. You schedule meshes with your own children. 
 
Cons: You could get a sub that doesn't really mesh with your classroom.  Dealing with difficult parents, but really in a lot of jobs other than teaching dealing with difficult people is a given. Compensation, unless you there for years, just starting out depending on where you live and/or education you may not make a lot. 

ceciliam
by Cecilia on Oct. 26, 2015 at 12:12 PM

Just bumping for you....never been a teacher.

atlmom2
by Ruby Member on Oct. 26, 2015 at 12:15 PM

Never been one but putting up with bratty kids who teachers can't discipline because their hands are tied, and even worse their parents would turn me off.  Also I hate the govt has too strict of guidlines on what teachers can teach or not.  

Bmat
by Barb on Oct. 26, 2015 at 12:56 PM

I wanted to teach all my life, but when I student taught I discovered it wasn't as I thought it would be. Of course I was teaching high school. I'd assume that elementary is different. The classes were I taught were too crowded, not enough supplies, parents difficult. The teachers were expected to be present at non-class times- such as in the cafeteria, in the halls, at the buses (for elementary) (for high school they were expected to lead at least one club outside of school hours.) There are meetings after school hours.  Work done at home to dress up the room.

On the other hand, there is nothing like that look in the student's eyes when they finally understand something you are teaching. It is very satisfying.

okpondlady
by on Oct. 26, 2015 at 2:21 PM

My younger dd came to me a couple of years ago and tells me she wants to be a teacher.  She loves working with kids.  I suggested to her that she look up teacher salaries and expectations, then look up other jobs that are working with kids and their salaries and expectations.   She has since decided she wants to be an Occupational Therapist.    I think that is a great decision and have encouraged her to go on with this.  She could in theory get a BS in Education and her Masters in OT.   She will just have to take an extra semester or fit in to her existing schedule the 6 extra classes that OT requires pre-enrollment to the program. 

TANSTAAFL- There ain't no such thing as a free lunch.

TableForTwelve
by on Oct. 26, 2015 at 2:29 PM
Every woman in my family teaches. I'm a phlebotomist (current SAHM) and the only one of us not on antidepressants.

“It turns out, somehow, there are a tremendous number of things to be optimistic about.” 
― Hank Green

pooh2you1985
by Member on Oct. 26, 2015 at 2:42 PM
Don't pick a favorite. No matter what you can't take your shoes of and throw them. You can't cry when they cry (apparently it is not funny)...

But that moment you realize they can recognize their ABCs and 123's. Write there name and read the few words you have been teaching then for a few months, is all priceless!!

I teach pre-k not the same as elementary school. But we get the basic done
virginiamama71
by Gold Member on Oct. 26, 2015 at 2:55 PM

I asked someone I work with who use to be a teacher.

Pros - summer/other breaks

cons- pay, planning, grading,  and dealing with difficult parents 

MomMomMomMama
by Member on Oct. 26, 2015 at 2:55 PM
I taught for 10 years. This response is sugar-coated to the max!

No dedicated teacher only works 190 days. It isn't possible...during the school year, you work 12 -15 hour days sometimes plus weekends. You're only required to be at school 190 days from 7-4 (or whatever) but that doesn't mean that's when work stops.
You will devote more time to your students and job than your family. Those two months off will be spent taking workshops or credit hours to keep up with the latest ever changing educational trends or to keep your certificate current.

This article sums up a lot from the teacher perspective.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2013/12/31/i-would-love-to-teach-but/

Quoting WILDCATGAL78:

I am not a teacher but I do come from a family of educators (all my aunts and mom are teachers as well as several cousins and my brother). I work for the school district and when my husband retires from the military, I was thinking about going back to teaching. Pros: You only work about 190 days out of the school year. You get all sorts of breaks throughout the school year as well as Summer, Spring and Winter break.  Everyday is different, you get to teach and watch young minds learn and grow. It's an opportunity to make a difference. You schedule meshes with your own children.  Cons: You could get a sub that doesn't really mesh with your classroom.  Dealing with difficult parents, but really in a lot of jobs other than teaching dealing with difficult people is a given. Compensation, unless you there for years, just starting out depending on where you live and/or education you may not make a lot. 

sabrtooth1
by on Oct. 26, 2015 at 3:24 PM

You DO understand, that in order to teach, you need a Bachelors in Education, OR a Bachelors in anything and a MASTERS in Education, and to have completed a student teaching and/or year-long mentoring program.  Then you need to pass testing requirments, which includes a basic skills/general knowledge test, a content-specific test, and depending on the state, a jurispridence test, since teachers are mandated reporters.  Then you need to pass a backround check.

After all that, teaching jobs are hard to get.  There are a million applicants for each position, and unless you have specific skills or certifications that are in demand, such as English as a Second Language, Special Ed or Counseling, your search will be long, and not necessarily fruitful.

Teachers hours begin before the students arrive, and end after they leave.  They are also required to attend parent and/or student meetings outside of instruction hours, attend staff meetings & development meetings which are ALSO outside instruction hours, and many states require individual continuing education, on your own time, paid for by you.  Many school districts require teachers to attend IEP and 504 plan meeting for EACH of their students who has one.  Teachers are required to develop their lesson plans, do their grading, and keep the school paperwork (i.e. log all the lessons, lesson grades, test grades, discipline reports, etc) current, on their own time.  Depending upon the school, you may have to buy your own instructional supplies. 

Elementary can be K-6 or K-8.  Each age has it's own challenges, but be aware,  by age 11 many of the children may be bigger than you, but without the emotional restraint and coping skills of an adult.  Because of Least Restrictive Environment requirments, you will have students with various emotional, and physical, disorders in your classroom, along with the normal range of student abilities.  And you must teach them ALL to grade level.  High stakes testing will show whether or not you are achieving that, and may be part of the basis for deciding whether or not you are retained.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)