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Scolding toddlers

Posted by on Apr. 11, 2016 at 1:55 PM
  • 7 Replies
I'm a first time mom to a 3 year old. How do you ladies scold your toddler when he/she isn't listening for nothing? I don't like smacking his hand or spanking him but sometimes it has to be done. What's the best way to go about this?
by on Apr. 11, 2016 at 1:55 PM
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Replies (1-7):
Zaichik90
by Member on Apr. 11, 2016 at 1:59 PM
I would go down to their eye level, hold their arm, and tell them to look at me. Then I would say something like "we don't __ in this house because ___. " if they do it again, I do the same but I tell them it's their last warning. Third time is a timeout in the corner until they calm down. Then I have them tell me why they're in time out. And that's it

It worked for me. It's important to tell them why things are not ok (it hurts, it makes someone sad, mommy doesn't like the mess, it's dangerous, etc)
WILDCATGAL78
by Silver Member on Apr. 11, 2016 at 2:01 PM

I always start out with redirection/warnings/"no". After that, then I take the object away if applicable, take away privileges (like playing games on mommy's tablet), and then lastly timeout. Some things are automatic times outs like hitting, kicking or throwing. I am not for/against spanking but I feel age three is still too young to be spanked. This is the age where they like to start testing their boundaries. If you are consistent with correcting behavior then spankings are not necessary. Some days it's a rinse and repeat over and over again, consistency is the key.

othermom
by Gold Member on Apr. 11, 2016 at 2:02 PM

Be consistent, time outs can help, a firm no and then redirecting.  Praising when the child does do something that you want

emarin77
by Silver Member on Apr. 11, 2016 at 2:03 PM

If a child is having difficulties listening, that can be a processing or hearing problem.  See a Dr. audiologist to evaluate.  Keep directions short and clear and look directly at them when speaking with them.

Flurffy
by Member on Apr. 11, 2016 at 2:09 PM
This.

Hearing "no" or "don't do that" from a distance has less impact than getting close and ensuring that they actually hear and understand what you're saying. It lets them know you're serious and also helps them learn how to express things. You teach them that they can't do XYZ because of ABC. Rather than just "no."

Quoting Zaichik90: I would go down to their eye level, hold their arm, and tell them to look at me. Then I would say something like "we don't __ in this house because ___. " if they do it again, I do the same but I tell them it's their last warning. Third time is a timeout in the corner until they calm down. Then I have them tell me why they're in time out. And that's it

It worked for me. It's important to tell them why things are not ok (it hurts, it makes someone sad, mommy doesn't like the mess, it's dangerous, etc)
cymkare
by Member on Apr. 11, 2016 at 2:12 PM

This pretty much 100%. I have a 2.7 year old and a 1.2 year old. It works for them both. 

Quoting Zaichik90: I would go down to their eye level, hold their arm, and tell them to look at me. Then I would say something like "we don't __ in this house because ___. " if they do it again, I do the same but I tell them it's their last warning. Third time is a timeout in the corner until they calm down. Then I have them tell me why they're in time out. And that's it It worked for me. It's important to tell them why things are not ok (it hurts, it makes someone sad, mommy doesn't like the mess, it's dangerous, etc)


atlmom2
by Ruby Member on Apr. 11, 2016 at 2:12 PM
Well 3 is one of the hardest age. Whatever you do has to be very consistant. It s not the terrible 2's. It is the terrible 3's really.
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