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Sleepless Nights! Pls HELP!

Posted by on Jun. 21, 2009 at 10:31 PM
  • 9 Replies

Hello!

My son who's 6 months old has recently been waking up. He used to sleep through the whole night since he was 2 months old and now hes not! Does anyone know why? We used to be in a one bdrm and his crib was in the same room as ours but we've recently upgraded to a 2 bdrm to give him his own room and ever since then hes been waking up! Is there any tips? My husband and I work 9-6 and go to school every day so we are exhausted! We feed him before his bedtime which is around 930pm...pls help =(

by on Jun. 21, 2009 at 10:31 PM
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Replies (1-9):
mommyof2grls06
by Gold Member on Jun. 21, 2009 at 10:39 PM

He might be teething, going through a growth spurt, or is hungry.

Say what you want about what I just wrote I probably won't see it.

Proud Marine Wife

A proud Christian, Republican, Anti- Gay marriage, Pro- Life, Natural childbirth having, Extended breastfeeding, Baby wearing, Attachment parenting, ERF, Spanking when needed, ANTI- CIO, Co-sleeping mommy to my 3 beautiful girls!

PM me if you have any questions.

Think what you want of me, we all have our own opinions. I state mine, you state yours, we're both happy.

leylah2002
by on Jun. 21, 2009 at 10:44 PM


Quoting mommyof2grls06:

He might be teething, going through a growth spurt, or is hungry.


Youre right, i think he is. This is my first child so its hard to say, should i give him teehthing medicine at night?

Lynniepoo86
by on Jun. 21, 2009 at 10:51 PM

Expert Answers:

 Deborah Lin-Dyken, pediatric sleep disorders expert Babies' sleep patterns can be affected by many things, including illness, vacations, changes in routine and advances in development. Many infants who were great sleepers as small babies start waking up again during the night between 6 and 10 months of age. Researchers aren't exactly sure why this happens, but many believe there may be some physiological or developmental cause. If your baby suddenly starts waking up during the night, step back and evaluate the situation. Has something in your baby's environment been altered? Has the weather changed so that your baby may be too cold during the night? Have the neighbors started leaving on an outdoor light that's shining into your baby's bedroom? Try to fix the problem. Dress him more warmly or put up a room-darkening shade. If street noise is the problem, try using a white noise machine or a fan in his room to drown it out. Next, consider whether the sudden nighttime wakings are following a period of illness, a vacation or another change in your baby's routine. Or do they coincide with a developmental milestone? If your baby has learned a new motor skill, he may want to try it out every chance he gets — even in the middle of the night. Some babies get caught up in pulling themselves up but then can't get themselves back down without help. Recent research has shown that sleep may also be disrupted in the few weeks before a major developmental leap, such as walking. The best way to deal with sudden nighttime wakings is to stick with what worked before. Don't suddenly change your baby's bedtime routine or the way you get your baby to sleep. Also, don't develop a bedtime habit that you won't want to stick to. Rocking your baby to sleep for a night or two may work in the short run, but you'll probably have to do it the next night and probably for the next month or more. Remain consistent in what you do for several weeks. This will help your baby return to sleeping through the night once the temporary issue is resolved.

mommyof2grls06
by Gold Member on Jun. 21, 2009 at 11:26 PM

You could call your ped and ask the right dosage of tylenol or motrin to give him before he goes to bed. Motrin lasts for about 6 hours and is approved for kids 6 months and older and Tylenol only lasts for about 4 hours. You could also try some orajel, but it never really worked for my kids for long. They have the "extra strength" night time stuff, but it's not any different than the regular stuff is and it costs more, so if you're going to get orajel, just get the regular stuff.

Say what you want about what I just wrote I probably won't see it.

Proud Marine Wife

A proud Christian, Republican, Anti- Gay marriage, Pro- Life, Natural childbirth having, Extended breastfeeding, Baby wearing, Attachment parenting, ERF, Spanking when needed, ANTI- CIO, Co-sleeping mommy to my 3 beautiful girls!

PM me if you have any questions.

Think what you want of me, we all have our own opinions. I state mine, you state yours, we're both happy.

Tiger420
by on Jun. 21, 2009 at 11:34 PM
It could be teething or a tummy ache or anything like that, but I think a big part of it is just that he's not in the same room as you anymore and that's bound to be a little scary for him! Try sitting next to the crib until he foes to sleep and slowly like once a week moving farther from the crib until you're in the hall or he just sleeps without you.
leylah2002
by on Jun. 21, 2009 at 11:48 PM


Quoting Lynniepoo86:

Expert Answers:

 Deborah Lin-Dyken, pediatric sleep disorders expert Babies' sleep patterns can be affected by many things, including illness, vacations, changes in routine and advances in development. Many infants who were great sleepers as small babies start waking up again during the night between 6 and 10 months of age. Researchers aren't exactly sure why this happens, but many believe there may be some physiological or developmental cause. If your baby suddenly starts waking up during the night, step back and evaluate the situation. Has something in your baby's environment been altered? Has the weather changed so that your baby may be too cold during the night? Have the neighbors started leaving on an outdoor light that's shining into your baby's bedroom? Try to fix the problem. Dress him more warmly or put up a room-darkening shade. If street noise is the problem, try using a white noise machine or a fan in his room to drown it out. Next, consider whether the sudden nighttime wakings are following a period of illness, a vacation or another change in your baby's routine. Or do they coincide with a developmental milestone? If your baby has learned a new motor skill, he may want to try it out every chance he gets — even in the middle of the night. Some babies get caught up in pulling themselves up but then can't get themselves back down without help. Recent research has shown that sleep may also be disrupted in the few weeks before a major developmental leap, such as walking. The best way to deal with sudden nighttime wakings is to stick with what worked before. Don't suddenly change your baby's bedtime routine or the way you get your baby to sleep. Also, don't develop a bedtime habit that you won't want to stick to. Rocking your baby to sleep for a night or two may work in the short run, but you'll probably have to do it the next night and probably for the next month or more. Remain consistent in what you do for several weeks. This will help your baby return to sleeping through the night once the temporary issue is resolved.


Thank you so much for this! It actually answers alot of questions i had! Its really hot here in texas and i think hes waking up to that because he's sweating everytime i pick him up at night. also could be the fact that hes in his own room and may feel that were not in the same room. Thanks Again!

rkoloms
by on Jun. 22, 2009 at 9:23 AM

For teething, stick with Hylands teething tabs and frozen damp washcloths for chewing, and nurse frequently. Babies sleep-patterns can change often.

Long term use of acetominiphen (like tylenol) and ibuprfen (like motrin) can damage the liver and other organs and should only be used when absolutely necessary.

Robin in Chicago

Mom2Tristan07
by on Jun. 22, 2009 at 12:32 PM

If he is teething, definately get the teething tablets from wal*mart or babys r us. They worked wonders with my son when he was teething and he still slept thru the night. Just give them to him before you lie him down and I bet he will be out like a light.

lmitchell13
by on Jun. 22, 2009 at 12:51 PM

you can also you vanilla extract if you are out of other teething medicines, just so you know. my dd does this every once in while too, teething and gas are normally the problems.

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