Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Can anyone educate me? I feel dumb for asking but....

Posted by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 11:48 AM
  • 8 Replies

I have had to go back to work full time recently. As a result, I feel like I am making less breast milk than I should and I am having trouble pumping enough to meet my 6 month olds demands while I am away. We decided to supplement with goat's milk. I drank it from four months of age, my DD from 8 months of age.

I mentioned it to our dr yesterday at our 6 month appoinment and he said he would encourage us to back off because it's too high in sodium. I have heard that it's important to be careful with how much sodium babies take in, but never why. I know sodium can increase blood pressure, but why else should babies have as little as possible?

Thanks for enlightening my ignorance.

Lilypie Fourth Birthday tickers
Lilypie

"Tolerance means I treat you with respect even when we totally disagree. You're a child of God. You're worthy of dignity. We may disagree, but we're going to tolerate each other, and even more than that, we can be friends. You're never going to please everybody. I don't need to agree with somebody in order to love them." - Rick Warren

by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 11:48 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-8):
RippledBegonias
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 11:52 AM

I believe that higher levels of sodium intake can lead to dehydration.

Mandafers
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 1:35 PM

Thanks!

geminijen
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 1:40 PM

Do you pump at work to keep your milk up? Also, with any changes in routine or growth of the baby, it can take a few days for your supply to raise itself. I only breast fed for a few days, but I remember the wic classes.

Mandafers
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 1:45 PM

Pumping at work isn't really an option. There's no place to do it and I only get one thirty minute break to eat my dinner. I am hoping that soon we will be able to buy a second reliable car so that DH can bring the baby to me on my break and I can feed him then.

proudmamafeb
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 8:26 PM

You realize that your boss has to accomodate your breast pumping schedule right? They can not tell you can not pump at work!! As far as  I know anyways unless it is different from state to state but I am almost positive that they have to accomodate your needs for this!

Quoting Mandafers:

Pumping at work isn't really an option. There's no place to do it and I only get one thirty minute break to eat my dinner. I am hoping that soon we will be able to buy a second reliable car so that DH can bring the baby to me on my break and I can feed him then.



joci2203
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 8:31 PM

You have to have an equal balance of water and sodium in your body.

I also used goat milk when my son started voluntarily weaning at 10 months. My mom used it with me too.  There is a specific kind though to use and I can't think of it right now, but when I remember I will re post.


ditzygirl987654
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 8:42 PM

Children

How sodium affects your children

  • Excess sodium intake leads to higher levels of blood pressure in children.
  • High blood pressure as a child leads to high blood pressure as an adult.
  • By consuming too much sodium, children develop a preference for salty foods and make less healthy choices as adults.
  • Eating too much sodium as a child could affect health in later life.
  • In addition to cardiovascular disease, sodium has been linked to obesity, stomach cancer, osteoporosis and asthma.

Adequate Intake of sodium per day for children (recommended average daily intake of a nutrient):

1,000 mg for children aged 1-3
1,200 mg for children aged 4-8
1,500 mg for children aged 9-18

Tolerable Upper Intake Level of sodium per day for children (highest continuous daily intake of a nutrient that does not appear to carry risks of adverse health effects in most members of a given group. In other words, it is the maximum amount of sodium that should be consumed in a day):

  • 1,500 mg - 2,200 mg for children and adolescents aged 1 to 13
  • Up to 2,300 mg for children aged 14 and older

Babies

  • Babies’ kidneys are not yet mature enough to deal with any added sodium.
  • The amount of sodium babies actually require is very small.
  • It is important to never add salt to any baby food.
  • There is enough sodium in breast milk and in infant formula to meet the needs of a baby.

Weaning

  • Never add salt to baby foods.
  • When making your own baby foods, avoid using processed foods that are not made specifically for babies.

Now, this is just what I found online, not just my opinion. Hope this is helpful.

Mandafers
by on Feb. 21, 2010 at 10:47 AM

Thank you guys, I really appreciate the help!

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)