Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Dr prescribed baby ( 2 weeks) a vit d supplement *** update*** with a few ?'s

Posted by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 12:13 AM
  • 34 Replies

wow thanks guys for the advice and info!!!! I knew better and REALLY questioned what he was tellin me about this crap.  Sometimes I feel all they (military drs) want to do is hand out a bunch of prescriptions.

As far as the outside stuff.....how often should he be exposed to the sun?? and should I put sunblock on hime???

fyi: he is a full term caucasion baby... if that info helps with replies/answers for me

so My son had his first pedatrician appt today. Hes 2 weeks 4 days. Dr asked if he was breast or formula fed, I said breast. so he prescribes the baby a vitamin d supplement. and in this supplement theres a bunch of other vitamins and b6 and b12 or whatever. So Im a lil disappointed and feel like all the breast feeding ive been doing "because its the best thing for baby" has been a waste. Everything Ive heard about "your milk has everything the baby needs" I feel is lies. If Im really giving him all he needs and If this HUGE commitment to breast feed is the best thing for my baby why in the hell have i been givin vitamin supplements to give him because this vitamin that he needs is NOT in my milk.???? Kinda makes a person who has made one of the biggest commitments of thier lives feel like its pointless and might as well give formula since it has all the vitamins the baby needs (so the dr said to me). How is that my milk isnt good enough even on top of STILL taking my prenatals???

Has anyone else's peds said or givin this to ur baby as well.???

by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 12:13 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
celticreverie
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 12:14 AM

Your doctor is an idiot.. unless you live in an area with NO sun and are very very dark skinned, a vit. d supplement is completely unnecessary.

A multi-vitamin is even more unnecessary.

I'd find a new pediatrician, one who actually knows about breastmilk/breastfeeding.


celticreverie
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 12:18 AM

Vitamin and mineral supplements are not necessary for the average healthy, full-term breastfed baby during the first year. Breastmilk is all that your baby needs for at least the first six months of life. Studies have shown that vitamins, fluoride, iron, water, juice, formula and solid foods are rarely beneficial to healthy breastfed babies during the first six months, and some can even be harmful. There are certain cases where a vitamin supplement may be needed for a breastfed baby during the first year, but these cases are the exception, not the rule (see below for specifics).

The American Academy of Pediatrics (Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk) states:

No supplements (water, glucose water, formula, and so forth) should be given to breastfeeding newborns unless a medical indication exists... Exclusive breastfeeding is ideal nutrition and sufficient to support optimal growth and development for approximately the first 6 months after birth.

AAP recommendations on specific vitamins are noted below.

Some very premature babies (weighing less than 1500 grams/3.3 pounds) may need extra vitamins and minerals, which can be added to their mother's milk before being given to the baby.

also:

“In the cases where babies developed rickets, they had easily identifiable risk factors: dark skin and [mothers] wearing veils or other coverings so that there was no exposure to the sun,” argues Elisabeth Sterken, national director of INFACT Canada, a breastfeeding advocacy group. These babies are in a higher-risk group because dark skin hinders absorption of sunlight, and veils worn by their mothers during pregnancy would also lower the amount of vitamin D passed on to their infants. “I think this suggests vitamin D supplements could be used as an intervention when needed, not routinely,” says Sterken.

Toronto paediatrician and breastfeeding specialist Jack Newman suggests a case-by-case approach. “The highest risk situation would be a mother who is veiled, dark-skinned, doesn’t drink milk and doesn’t go outside,” he says. “If her baby doesn’t get exposure to sunlight either, then that baby should get vitamin D supplements.”

On the other hand, mothers like McKellar are at “virtually no risk,”

Newman says. “If the mother is light-skinned, spends a short time outside with some skin exposed [without sunscreen] - even if it’s just her face and hands - and consumes vitamin-D-fortified dairy products, she’ll have passed lots of vitamin D on to her baby during the pregnancy. If that baby also spends time outdoors, he’ll be fine.”

If a mother has not had enough sun exposure or vitamin D during her pregnancy, says Sterken, this should be addressed. “By simply treating all babies after birth, we ignore the issue of the mother’s nutritional status, and I think we should be paying attention to that as well.”

 

DeziiRee
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 12:19 AM

i agree you need a new ped...ive never heard a ped act like that, he is a complete idiot.

Ericha7
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 12:23 AM

my doctor did. not all doctors do but mine said it's because they can't tell you to take your baby outside. it won't hurt your baby.

MinniMoniMommi
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 12:31 AM
My doc did, it is perfectly ok, but it is not necessary. If you don't want to give it to your baby don't. (Not being mean!) Ionly give it to Reny when we don't get outside.
TK87
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 12:32 AM

Breastfeeding is not a waste of time.  My daughter was breastfed and never was sick and then when she was 10 months I could no longer breastfeed because of my pregnancy.  Since she got formula she got pnemonia and an ear infection.  On top of that the formula made her constipated.  She couldn't even poo without prune juice.  Breastfeeding is so much better.  From my experience with formula i don't think the stuff is healthy at all.

JennaFoix
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 12:39 AM

wow thanks guys for the advice and info!!!! I knew better and REALLY questioned what he was tellin me about this crap.  Sometimes I feel all they (military drs) want to do is hand out a bunch of prescriptions.

As far as the outside stuff.....how often should he be exposed to the sun?? and should I put sunblock on hime???

fyi: he is a full term caucasion baby... if that info helps with replies/answers for me.

babygomez
by April on Mar. 6, 2010 at 12:47 AM

 I ff my daughter for her whole first year and never had any problems with it..i think if you decide to start giving him formula, it won't hurt your child at all and in fact is healthy. Not everyone can bf and some choose not to, that's why there is a supplement for it. I was ff as well as everyone in my family and we have been blessed to be healthy and came out just fine :) Hope everything works out for ya~

mommy-to-be1-17
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 12:52 AM

I work at at peds office and I know they recommend it to all bf babies, I belive its a fairly new thing becasue I was not told to give it to my daughter who is 14 mo. ITs just a recomendation you dont have to. Also no sunscreen till 6 months. And keep on bf! it is the best thing for baby!! and helps you lose weight too! :)

MinniMoniMommi
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 12:52 AM
Everyone is supposed to get at least 15 mins of sun/ outside exposure a day. No with him being so little you could put his cradle or bassent or whatever in front of the window, with the sun light coming in on him. Vit. D is important and our bodies make it from the sun. But its winter and hard to get out so I would do this.
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)