Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Do you get enough sleep?

Posted by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 1:05 PM
  • 30 Replies

 

Poll

Question: Side Poll: How do you sleep?

Options:

You get 8+ hours of sleep a night co-sleeping with your baby

You get 8+ hours of sleep a night not co-sleeping with your baby

You get 8- hours of sleep a night co-sleeping with your baby

You get 8- hours of sleep a night not co-sleeping with your baby


Only group members can vote in this poll.

Total Votes: 56

View Results

Sleep Well: Physicians understand effect of sleep on performance

Some people brag about not needing to sleep, but for most of us, just more than eight hours of shut eye is required for optimum performance and longer life. If people think they pack more life in because they are sleeping less, Jaime Boero, M.D., Ph.D., a sleep specialist at Marshfield Clinic Neurosciences, says otherwise.

Teens in classroom

“The less you sleep, the sooner you die,” Dr. Boero said. Those dramatic words resonate as lack of sleep can affect every aspect of life.

Reduced sleep affects everyone, from children to seniors. For children, failing to get enough sleep can contribute to an inability to learn or process new information, sometimes making school a challenge. Parents can help children improve their sleep by having a consistent time for going to bed and getting up. Avoid stimulus in the bedroom, such as television sets.

A regular bedtime routine also helps a child’s body wind down and get ready for sleep, Dr. Boero said. Children who do not get enough sleep perform poorly in school. In addition, some cases of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder can be directly connected to lack of sleep, Dr. Boero said.

“When you don’t get enough sleep you are more easily distracted, and it’s harder to concentrate on a task,” he said. “You’re more irritable and less flexible.”

As children enter puberty, their sleep rhythms change. As most parents of teens know, adolescents have different sleep clocks than children or adults. Teens tend to stay up later and sleep later as well. “That’s not just a desire to watch the Late Show,” Dr. Boero said. “It’s a change in the way teens cycle through their day and night.”

To help teens, school districts in some communities start their school day later for high school students. “It means kids can sleep an hour later in the morning, and it can really improve school performance,” Dr. Boero said.

Teens can make changes to improve sleep, even if it means going to bed a bit earlier than their natural rhythm would dictate. As with young children, a set bedtime and waking time – even on the weekends – can make it easier to get enough sleep. Teens should avoid caffeine and nicotine and develop a regular nighttime routine. Sleep in a dark room and open blinds to let in light right away in the morning. This will signal the body it is time to wake.

If you need to take a nap during the day, that may be because you are not sleeping enough at night. “Needing to nap during the day is sometimes a sign that something is wrong at night,” Dr. Boero said. “You are probably getting insufficient sleep time.”

Sleep is a fascinating field. Every single organ inthe body is affected by sleep and can be improved by sleep. Quote from Jaime Boero, MD

“Everyone wants to function on six hours of sleep,” he said. “But most people cannot do that.”

Lack of sleep contributes to other health problems that may seem unrelated to rest. Shift workers, particularly those people who work one shift for a few days or a week and then switch to another, tend to have problems with sleep. “They have greater health care utilization,” Dr. Boero said. “They are at increased risk of heart attack, diabetes, stroke, hypertension and obesity.” This chronic lack of sleep contributes to car crashes and industrial accidents as people try to keep themselves awake during work and driving.

Lack of sleep also plays a part in weight gain. “People use food to keep themselves awake,” Dr. Boero said. “Appetite is regulated by sleep as well.”

Insomnia affects one in three Americans, said Amit Biswas, M.D., a sleep specialist at Marshfield Clinic Wausau and Weston centers. It is most common in women and older adults. Some people experience it during stressful periods of life, such as relationship problems or chronically ill family member. Situational insomnia can occur following death of a loved one, job loss or other bad news.

Sleep disorders and illnesses that disrupt sleep may be mistaken for insomnia. Chronic pain, heartburn from acid reflux and depression commonly cause poor sleep. Treating the physical or psychological disorder through medication and counseling can improve sleep. Breathing problems, such as sleep apnea, or periodic leg movements can also prevent sound sleep.

Most people with insomnia do not need sleep medicine, Dr. Boero said. “If there is a cause, we want to treat the cause,” he said. That may include learning to manage stress, improving the sleep environment or sleep hygiene. “After three to six months of insomnia, we start to worry,” he said. “Insomnia can acquire a life of its own and self-perpetuate.”

Most of the health problems caused by limited sleep can be improved simply by getting enough sleep, he said. “Sleep is a fascinating field. Every single organ in the body is affected by sleep and can be improved by sleep.”

http://www.marshfieldclinic.org/patients/?page=cattails_2008_mayjun_sleep


.....Ophelia Grace...............Mira Lorne...............Jude Bennett.........Liam Daniel Baines.


by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 1:05 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
expectantmom81
by Erin on Dec. 18, 2012 at 1:07 PM
I voted 8+ without co-sleeping but some nights are less.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
abra
by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 1:08 PM

yes, it will vary, but generally. ;-) 

Quoting expectantmom81:

I voted 8+ without co-sleeping but some nights are less.


shesliketx
by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 1:08 PM
I rarely get 8 hrs of sleep. I take adderall though and it makes it hard to sleep sometimes, add in 2 kids under age 4 and a husband who can't get up during the night unless its an emergency (he has to be up by 515 at the latest and then drive for 25 min in heavy traffic) and sleep is on the back burner
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
MommyofSCC
by Bronze Member on Dec. 18, 2012 at 1:10 PM

I get less than 8 hours not co-sleeping,  however it has nothing to do with my baby.  

KylersMom8-16-7
by Gold Member on Dec. 18, 2012 at 1:12 PM
8-9 hours co-sleeping:-)
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Diamondblue1
by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 1:14 PM
I'm not getting 8 hours too much. My baby is a month now and she's starting to stay up for 5 to 6 hours at a time at the wrong times lol.
1st_time_mom789
by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 1:55 PM

 Been getting less than 8 hours of sleep lately. We have been trying to get DD to stay in her bed/room at night but the past two weeks she has been screaming at the top of her lungs until I go in her room. So night time has not been fun arund here and we've been having very restless nights. Hoping things will get better soon. I just bought her a turtle dream light yesterday so we are hoping that she will stay in her room/bed until morning with that. If not I am thinking about getting the glo clock. it has a moon on it at night and then in the morning it has the sun. Seems like a cool gadget and I have heard soooo many good things about it.

babygomez
by April on Dec. 18, 2012 at 2:21 PM

Usually about 7 hrs. Sometimes less, but not because of my kids, because of insomnia.

No co-sleeping.

jhslove
by on Dec. 18, 2012 at 2:23 PM

Almost every night I get 8-9 hours. My daughter sleeps in a crib in her own room. She sleeps through 11-12 hours unless she's teething or not feeling well.......which was the case last night. But that's very rare.

la_bella_vita
by Bella on Dec. 18, 2012 at 4:08 PM

 We no longer co-sleep and I always get 8 hours of sleep. My children are great sleepers. Truly blessed.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)