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Is my little one ready for solids or cereal?

I was planning on waiting until 6 months to introduce her to rice cereal. She is just about to turn 4 months old, and is getting massive and has been wanting to nurse hourly for the past 3 weeks.. She won't even sleep at night, she just wants to nurse.
Well, last night at a restaurant with some family, she was sitting next to me, while I ate my salad. Everytime I'd lift my fork, she'd open her mouth real wide and follow it into my mouth. My mom insisted that it would be fine to let her try a taste of Ranch dressing, so I did. And she loved it. She opened her mouth right up, swallowed it, and smiled real big. She kept opening her mouth for more. Now she watches, fusses, and opens her mouth for food when I eat. :/
I have no problem nursing her on demand, but if she's not getting enough? Idk..her pedi told me last month I could start introducing rice cereal w/ breast milk, but I just felt she wasn't ready. Advice? 

by on Dec. 29, 2012 at 4:36 PM
Replies (21-30):
mandapanda82
by on Dec. 29, 2012 at 8:16 PM
I think you ladies need new pedis!


Quoting cabrandy03:

Kylersmom is 100% correct.  Dr's recieve little or no training in infant feeding, so they do NOT know best when it comes to things like this.  It's our job as parents to do research on our own so that we're well enough informed to know when our pediatricians give us bad information.

Quoting mandapanda82:

..... Uhhh okkaay





Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

Actually pediatricians know very little about infant nutrition. They get about an hour of education on nutrition in all the YEARS of schooling they receive.

A well educated pediatrician will tell you no solids until 6 months, skip infant cereal, and do table foods not purees but honestly good luck finding one that doesn't want you to shovel liquidfied cardboard down babies throat at 4 months or sooner.

Infant cereal lacks real nutrition, its FORTIFIED with vitamins. This actually prevents iron absorption from breastmilk.

Your baby nurses frequently because breastmilk is so perfect the body can break it down is 90 minutes or less. Babies also go through growth spurts, these can happen ANY time. Babies also nurse for comfort. Your baby need nothing but breastmilk until 12 months(sometimes longer.)

From Kellymom:

Some toddlers are eating very few solids, or even no solids, at 12 months. This is not unusual and really depends on your child – there is quite a big variation. We like to see breastmilk making up the majority (around 75%) of baby’s diet at 12 months. Some babies will be taking more solids by 12 months, but others will still be exclusively or almost-exclusively breastfed at this point. It is normal for baby to keep breastmilk as the primary part of his diet up until 18 months or even longer. An example of a nice gradual increase in solids would be 25% solids at 12 months, 50% solids at 18 months, and 80% solids at 24 months.

Some children take a little longer to begin taking solids well. Some of them have food sensitivities and this may be their body’s way of protecting them until their digestive system can handle more. Others are late teethers or have a lot of difficulty with teething pain. At this point there is NOTHING that your milk lacks that your child needs, with the possible exception of enough iron. As long as his iron levels are within acceptable levels and when he does eat you are offering him foods naturally rich in iron, then you have plenty of time before you need to worry about the amount of solids he’s getting.




Quoting mandapanda82:

My dd is 4 months tomorrow I was wondering the same thing- she doesn't really seem to interested but am just wondering when to start. With dd1 I started at. 6months w purées. I'm planning on making my own this time. But ya like another poster said, you will get a ton of mixed responses... Talk to your pedi and you they know best:) GL








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cabrandy03
by Brandy on Dec. 29, 2012 at 8:18 PM
cabrandy03
by Brandy on Dec. 29, 2012 at 8:22 PM
1 mom liked this

I have an excellent pedi, I just know better then to take any one persons word (even a medical professional's word) for it when it comes to taking care of my child.  I want to be as informed as possible and the truth of the matter is that no pediatrician is perfect or knows everything.

Quoting mandapanda82:

I think you ladies need new pedis!


Quoting cabrandy03:

Kylersmom is 100% correct.  Dr's recieve little or no training in infant feeding, so they do NOT know best when it comes to things like this.  It's our job as parents to do research on our own so that we're well enough informed to know when our pediatricians give us bad information.

Quoting mandapanda82:

..... Uhhh okkaay





Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

Actually pediatricians know very little about infant nutrition. They get about an hour of education on nutrition in all the YEARS of schooling they receive.

A well educated pediatrician will tell you no solids until 6 months, skip infant cereal, and do table foods not purees but honestly good luck finding one that doesn't want you to shovel liquidfied cardboard down babies throat at 4 months or sooner.

Infant cereal lacks real nutrition, its FORTIFIED with vitamins. This actually prevents iron absorption from breastmilk.

Your baby nurses frequently because breastmilk is so perfect the body can break it down is 90 minutes or less. Babies also go through growth spurts, these can happen ANY time. Babies also nurse for comfort. Your baby need nothing but breastmilk until 12 months(sometimes longer.)

From Kellymom:

Some toddlers are eating very few solids, or even no solids, at 12 months. This is not unusual and really depends on your child – there is quite a big variation. We like to see breastmilk making up the majority (around 75%) of baby’s diet at 12 months. Some babies will be taking more solids by 12 months, but others will still be exclusively or almost-exclusively breastfed at this point. It is normal for baby to keep breastmilk as the primary part of his diet up until 18 months or even longer. An example of a nice gradual increase in solids would be 25% solids at 12 months, 50% solids at 18 months, and 80% solids at 24 months.

Some children take a little longer to begin taking solids well. Some of them have food sensitivities and this may be their body’s way of protecting them until their digestive system can handle more. Others are late teethers or have a lot of difficulty with teething pain. At this point there is NOTHING that your milk lacks that your child needs, with the possible exception of enough iron. As long as his iron levels are within acceptable levels and when he does eat you are offering him foods naturally rich in iron, then you have plenty of time before you need to worry about the amount of solids he’s getting.




Quoting mandapanda82:

My dd is 4 months tomorrow I was wondering the same thing- she doesn't really seem to interested but am just wondering when to start. With dd1 I started at. 6months w purées. I'm planning on making my own this time. But ya like another poster said, you will get a ton of mixed responses... Talk to your pedi and you they know best:) GL









aniters
by on Dec. 29, 2012 at 8:28 PM
I would wait until at least 6 months.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
KylersMom8-16-7
by Gold Member on Dec. 29, 2012 at 8:44 PM
1 mom liked this
Why?

Pediatricians are fine for medical advice but nutrition wise can't be trusted. I don't believe everything he says just because he has a degree. I do my own research and I prove him wrong frequently when it comes to nutrition.

He tried to tell me I needed to start solids at 5.5 months because it's been shown to lessen allergen risk; NOT true. He also said to start with cereal which is actually really unhealthy and can't be digested properly.

He tried to tell me after 12 months breastmilk loses calories and fat and I should start whole milk; wrong. Breastmilk is the most calories dense of all milks. It also doesn't lose fat or any nutrients but adjusts to meet babies nutritional needs as long as you nurse.


Quoting mandapanda82:

Maybe you need a new pedi?




Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

Actually pediatricians know very little about infant nutrition. They get about an hour of education on nutrition in all the YEARS of schooling they receive.

A well educated pediatrician will tell you no solids until 6 months, skip infant cereal, and do table foods not purees but honestly good luck finding one that doesn't want you to shovel liquidfied cardboard down babies throat at 4 months or sooner.

Infant cereal lacks real nutrition, its FORTIFIED with vitamins. This actually prevents iron absorption from breastmilk.

Your baby nurses frequently because breastmilk is so perfect the body can break it down is 90 minutes or less. Babies also go through growth spurts, these can happen ANY time. Babies also nurse for comfort. Your baby need nothing but breastmilk until 12 months(sometimes longer.)

From Kellymom:

Some toddlers are eating very few solids, or even no solids, at 12 months. This is not unusual and really depends on your child – there is quite a big variation. We like to see breastmilk making up the majority (around 75%) of baby’s diet at 12 months. Some babies will be taking more solids by 12 months, but others will still be exclusively or almost-exclusively breastfed at this point. It is normal for baby to keep breastmilk as the primary part of his diet up until 18 months or even longer. An example of a nice gradual increase in solids would be 25% solids at 12 months, 50% solids at 18 months, and 80% solids at 24 months.

Some children take a little longer to begin taking solids well. Some of them have food sensitivities and this may be their body’s way of protecting them until their digestive system can handle more. Others are late teethers or have a lot of difficulty with teething pain. At this point there is NOTHING that your milk lacks that your child needs, with the possible exception of enough iron. As long as his iron levels are within acceptable levels and when he does eat you are offering him foods naturally rich in iron, then you have plenty of time before you need to worry about the amount of solids he’s getting.




Quoting mandapanda82:

My dd is 4 months tomorrow I was wondering the same thing- she doesn't really seem to interested but am just wondering when to start. With dd1 I started at. 6months w purées. I'm planning on making my own this time. But ya like another poster said, you will get a ton of mixed responses... Talk to your pedi and you they know best:) GL






Posted on CafeMom Mobile
IrishIz
by Silver Member on Dec. 29, 2012 at 8:46 PM
1 mom liked this

They need a new ped?   Seriously?   If  they have peds recommending 6 months for solids they have a good ped.  If your ped is recommending solids prior to 6 months you are the one in need of a new ped.  The major health organizations, WHO and AAP, each recommend solid food at 6 months or later.  

Quoting mandapanda82:

I think you ladies need new pedis!


Quoting cabrandy03:

Kylersmom is 100% correct.  Dr's recieve little or no training in infant feeding, so they do NOT know best when it comes to things like this.  It's our job as parents to do research on our own so that we're well enough informed to know when our pediatricians give us bad information.

Quoting mandapanda82:

..... Uhhh okkaay





Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

Actually pediatricians know very little about infant nutrition. They get about an hour of education on nutrition in all the YEARS of schooling they receive.

A well educated pediatrician will tell you no solids until 6 months, skip infant cereal, and do table foods not purees but honestly good luck finding one that doesn't want you to shovel liquidfied cardboard down babies throat at 4 months or sooner.

Infant cereal lacks real nutrition, its FORTIFIED with vitamins. This actually prevents iron absorption from breastmilk.

Your baby nurses frequently because breastmilk is so perfect the body can break it down is 90 minutes or less. Babies also go through growth spurts, these can happen ANY time. Babies also nurse for comfort. Your baby need nothing but breastmilk until 12 months(sometimes longer.)

From Kellymom:

Some toddlers are eating very few solids, or even no solids, at 12 months. This is not unusual and really depends on your child – there is quite a big variation. We like to see breastmilk making up the majority (around 75%) of baby’s diet at 12 months. Some babies will be taking more solids by 12 months, but others will still be exclusively or almost-exclusively breastfed at this point. It is normal for baby to keep breastmilk as the primary part of his diet up until 18 months or even longer. An example of a nice gradual increase in solids would be 25% solids at 12 months, 50% solids at 18 months, and 80% solids at 24 months.

Some children take a little longer to begin taking solids well. Some of them have food sensitivities and this may be their body’s way of protecting them until their digestive system can handle more. Others are late teethers or have a lot of difficulty with teething pain. At this point there is NOTHING that your milk lacks that your child needs, with the possible exception of enough iron. As long as his iron levels are within acceptable levels and when he does eat you are offering him foods naturally rich in iron, then you have plenty of time before you need to worry about the amount of solids he’s getting.




Quoting mandapanda82:

My dd is 4 months tomorrow I was wondering the same thing- she doesn't really seem to interested but am just wondering when to start. With dd1 I started at. 6months w purées. I'm planning on making my own this time. But ya like another poster said, you will get a ton of mixed responses... Talk to your pedi and you they know best:) GL









larissalarie
by Platinum Member on Dec. 29, 2012 at 8:59 PM
1 mom liked this
Lol, yeah it's the people with the pedis following current guidelines based on up to date research, NOT the person who's pedi is following old wives tales!

Personally, I don't care if my doctor knows about infant nutrition. I've got more than half an ounce of common sense and don't need their input or permission on how to fed my kid. All I care is that they paid attention to what they ACTUALLY teach at med school-MEDICINE.

And for the record, between 3 kids and living in 3 different states and 5 pedis I've NEVER had one that said solids before 6 months was ok (not that it would matter). Of course I also select doctors who are younger and connected to major research/teaching hospitals. That way if my children ever do need their expertise I know that it's not some old geezer following cutting edge science...from the 50's!


Quoting mandapanda82:

I think you ladies need new pedis!




Quoting cabrandy03:

Kylersmom is 100% correct.  Dr's recieve little or no training in infant feeding, so they do NOT know best when it comes to things like this.  It's our job as parents to do research on our own so that we're well enough informed to know when our pediatricians give us bad information.

Quoting mandapanda82:

..... Uhhh okkaay








Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

Actually pediatricians know very little about infant nutrition. They get about an hour of education on nutrition in all the YEARS of schooling they receive.

A well educated pediatrician will tell you no solids until 6 months, skip infant cereal, and do table foods not purees but honestly good luck finding one that doesn't want you to shovel liquidfied cardboard down babies throat at 4 months or sooner.

Infant cereal lacks real nutrition, its FORTIFIED with vitamins. This actually prevents iron absorption from breastmilk.

Your baby nurses frequently because breastmilk is so perfect the body can break it down is 90 minutes or less. Babies also go through growth spurts, these can happen ANY time. Babies also nurse for comfort. Your baby need nothing but breastmilk until 12 months(sometimes longer.)

From Kellymom:

Some toddlers are eating very few solids, or even no solids, at 12 months. This is not unusual and really depends on your child – there is quite a big variation. We like to see breastmilk making up the majority (around 75%) of baby’s diet at 12 months. Some babies will be taking more solids by 12 months, but others will still be exclusively or almost-exclusively breastfed at this point. It is normal for baby to keep breastmilk as the primary part of his diet up until 18 months or even longer. An example of a nice gradual increase in solids would be 25% solids at 12 months, 50% solids at 18 months, and 80% solids at 24 months.

Some children take a little longer to begin taking solids well. Some of them have food sensitivities and this may be their body’s way of protecting them until their digestive system can handle more. Others are late teethers or have a lot of difficulty with teething pain. At this point there is NOTHING that your milk lacks that your child needs, with the possible exception of enough iron. As long as his iron levels are within acceptable levels and when he does eat you are offering him foods naturally rich in iron, then you have plenty of time before you need to worry about the amount of solids he’s getting.





Quoting mandapanda82:

My dd is 4 months tomorrow I was wondering the same thing- she doesn't really seem to interested but am just wondering when to start. With dd1 I started at. 6months w purées. I'm planning on making my own this time. But ya like another poster said, you will get a ton of mixed responses... Talk to your pedi and you they know best:) GL










Posted on CafeMom Mobile
mandapanda82
by on Dec. 29, 2012 at 9:24 PM
Well I'm saying the mother should know too when her baby's ready And the dr. Not every dr. Of course is trustworthy and know everything but come on, there are some really good doctors out there


Quoting IrishIz:

They need a new ped?   Seriously?   If  they have peds recommending 6 months for solids they have a good ped.  If your ped is recommending solids prior to 6 months you are the one in need of a new ped.  The major health organizations, WHO and AAP, each recommend solid food at 6 months or later.  

Quoting mandapanda82:

I think you ladies need new pedis!





Quoting cabrandy03:

Kylersmom is 100% correct.  Dr's recieve little or no training in infant feeding, so they do NOT know best when it comes to things like this.  It's our job as parents to do research on our own so that we're well enough informed to know when our pediatricians give us bad information.

Quoting mandapanda82:

..... Uhhh okkaay








Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

Actually pediatricians know very little about infant nutrition. They get about an hour of education on nutrition in all the YEARS of schooling they receive.

A well educated pediatrician will tell you no solids until 6 months, skip infant cereal, and do table foods not purees but honestly good luck finding one that doesn't want you to shovel liquidfied cardboard down babies throat at 4 months or sooner.

Infant cereal lacks real nutrition, its FORTIFIED with vitamins. This actually prevents iron absorption from breastmilk.

Your baby nurses frequently because breastmilk is so perfect the body can break it down is 90 minutes or less. Babies also go through growth spurts, these can happen ANY time. Babies also nurse for comfort. Your baby need nothing but breastmilk until 12 months(sometimes longer.)

From Kellymom:

Some toddlers are eating very few solids, or even no solids, at 12 months. This is not unusual and really depends on your child – there is quite a big variation. We like to see breastmilk making up the majority (around 75%) of baby’s diet at 12 months. Some babies will be taking more solids by 12 months, but others will still be exclusively or almost-exclusively breastfed at this point. It is normal for baby to keep breastmilk as the primary part of his diet up until 18 months or even longer. An example of a nice gradual increase in solids would be 25% solids at 12 months, 50% solids at 18 months, and 80% solids at 24 months.

Some children take a little longer to begin taking solids well. Some of them have food sensitivities and this may be their body’s way of protecting them until their digestive system can handle more. Others are late teethers or have a lot of difficulty with teething pain. At this point there is NOTHING that your milk lacks that your child needs, with the possible exception of enough iron. As long as his iron levels are within acceptable levels and when he does eat you are offering him foods naturally rich in iron, then you have plenty of time before you need to worry about the amount of solids he’s getting.





Quoting mandapanda82:

My dd is 4 months tomorrow I was wondering the same thing- she doesn't really seem to interested but am just wondering when to start. With dd1 I started at. 6months w purées. I'm planning on making my own this time. But ya like another poster said, you will get a ton of mixed responses... Talk to your pedi and you they know best:) GL













Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
bnichole87
by on Dec. 29, 2012 at 9:24 PM

I've had the same problem with deciding when to start solids. My plan is this: 1. Ask his pediatricians for his input 2. Do my own research .. And, most importantly- 3. Listen to my instincts.

I think that you know your child best and if you feel they're ready before other people tell you your child is ready, then try it. If they're not ready, then stop. There's no rule saying that after trying it you must continue. You've known your child from the very beginning and you know things about them that other people do not (what that cry means, what makes them crabby, what their favorite toy is) so make the decision for your child, don't let other people parent your baby for you. Best of luck! :)

CafeMom Tickers
preacherskid
by on Dec. 29, 2012 at 9:29 PM

Most of what I could say has already been said so I'll just share what worked for us.  With our older dd we followed all the advice, and she had a sensitive tummy, constipated a lot, and she had an undiagnosed allergy for most of her infancy.  Our second was a preemie, and had nasty reflux.  I did more research with her.  We waited for developmental signs: sitting upright and unsupported, loss of tongue thrust reflex, and grasping small things and bringing them to her mouth.  She was six- seven months when she hit all those signs.  Daycare tried starting her earlier without my permission on purees sooner, we switched daycares but she had developed a puree aversion, so we started her off with soft cooked sweet potatoes, squash, that sort of thing.  She loved that, she felt like big stuff at supper :)

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