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'Passive' TV can harm your baby's speech making it harder for them to later cope in school

Posted by on Jan. 10, 2013 at 12:51 PM
  • 4 Replies



Children are as vulnerable to the effects of ‘passive TV’ as they are to secondhand smoking, according to experts.

Casual exposure can harm their language development, making it harder for them to cope when they go to school, they claim.

The American Academy of Paediatrics has included warnings about ‘secondhand television’ in its guidelines for children aged under two.

Exposure: Young children are as vulnerable to the effects of 'passive TV' as they are to secondhand smoking, according to researchers

Exposure: Young children are as vulnerable to the effects of 'passive TV' as they are to secondhand smoking, according to researchers

Parents are more tempted than ever these days to rely on TV or computers to keep babies and toddlers entertained, the academy said.

But as well as discouraging the amount of screen-time to which youngsters are exposed, it cautioned against adults watching television with them nearby.

Studies revealed background TV reduced the time small children spent playing and caused their concentration to wander.

 

The AAP report said TV deterred children and parents from interacting, which it said was crucial to vocabulary development.

‘When parents are watching their own programmes, this is “background media” for their children,’ it said.

‘It distracts the parent and decreases parent-child interaction. Its presence may also interfere with a young child’s learning from play.’

It said parents needed to understand that 'their own media use can have a negative effect on children'.

Easy option: Parents are more tempted than ever these days to rely on TV or computers to keep babies and toddlers entertained

Easy option: Parents are more tempted than ever these days to rely on TV or computers to keep babies and toddlers entertained

Experts say that so-called 'unstructured' free play time is more valuable for the developing brain than electronic media.

They also believe that TV viewing around bedtime can cause very young children to sleep badly.

'If you’re trying to connect with your kids, you’ve got to turn the screens off,' said Ari Brown, a Texas paediatrician who led the AAP’s new research.

Whenever the focus in a room is on television 'there’s less talk time', she added.

She said families should try to switch off TVs when nobody was watching and adults should wait until very young children are in bed before sitting down to view.

Lisa Guernsey, an early learning expert, said parents are distracted by TV in the same way that pre-schoolers are affected.

Meanwhile, other U.S. research has shown that children aged eight and under spend nearly four times as much of their day watching TV as they do other activities.

On average youngsters watched television shows for 1.44 hours compared to around half an hour for reading, listening to music or playing computer games.

Common Sense Media, which surveyed 1,400 parents, said the data should serve as a ‘wake up call’ to parents.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2054950/Passive-TV-watching-harm-babies-speech.html#ixzz2Hb0by2yZ 


.....Ophelia Grace...............Mira Lorne...............Jude Bennett.........Liam Daniel Baines.


by on Jan. 10, 2013 at 12:51 PM
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Replies (1-4):
Junebaby18
by Nannerz on Jan. 10, 2013 at 4:17 PM
My 18 month old dd watches tv with us all the time. Her vocabulary is above normal. If she didn't watch any tv, she may be a genius instead! lol

I personally hate when the tv is on when its just her and I at home. When dh gets home from work or when he's off, the tv is on all the time.
mommyhonu
by Mary on Jan. 10, 2013 at 6:58 PM

 very interesting

aimesnyc
by on Jan. 10, 2013 at 9:45 PM

I think it would be safe to assume that the majority of us were exposed to "passive tv" and we are a mixed bag of language skills and intelligence.  Point being, maybe it's not necessarily the television in the background, but the rest of the environment?  Like parents that ignore their babies entirely while the television happens to be on, etc?  My tv might be on sometimes as background noise, but I still play with and talk to my son all the time.  And he is intelligent and constantly talking (even if most of it is babble with only a few real words).  The only time he ever pays attention to the TV is if there is music (as he loves music).  Otherwise he is too busy playing with his toys, following me and exploring the apt.

Thelmama
by Bronze Member on Jan. 10, 2013 at 9:46 PM

My kids all had above normal speech and now reading skills. We watch tv and have since their infancy.  However, we talk about what they see and always have.  My kids would be ready for mensa now if that is the case. LOL.  It is all about balance. And playing and talking to and reading with your kids.

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