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Babies Babies

In desperate need!

Posted by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 5:39 AM
  • 27 Replies
My 9 month old had NEVER slept well from the moment I brought her home from the hospital. I have tried everything and I still have not had a 2 night streak of sleeping well. I was lucky enough to have 3 full nights of sleep but they were each many months apart for no apparent reason. I truly am at a loss with her. I figured by now she would just be able to put herself to sleep but I've had no such luck. She literally wakes up screaming bloody murder and won't stop unless I breastfeeding her and right now I'm pumping and doing bottles because my breasts hurt so bad from pumping and breastfeeding. I have had such a difficult time with everything and it really hasn't been too much fun. I am in constant pain and I don't get a wink of sleep. I've posted on here before about her sleep habits and some of the tips worked but I still am not able to get her to sleep straight through the night. Please please please can someone give me some helpful advice!
by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 5:39 AM
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Replies (1-10):
MommyO2-6631
by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 7:59 AM
3 moms liked this
We cosleep. I sleep, he eats. Problem solved
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jenemiah
by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 8:19 AM
2 moms liked this

Is she eating infant cereal yet? My mother used to put infant cereal in our bottles....just like a teaspoon full.  She said that worked well.  Personally I never tried it. I didn't need to my daughter was never a big eater.  My sister said it worked for her daughter as well. Mom and my sister started it at 3 months.  If you choose to try it you will have to find special nipples for the bottle or make the wholes slightly bigger  or they will clog. I would still recommend talking to her pediatrician though.  Maybe they will have some ideas for you.  Its not healthy for you to miss alot of sleep or have so much pain. I hope you find something that works for you. 


clau1985
by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 8:39 AM
My daughter used to be like that when she was born. She suffered from colics and she would stay up all night crying. But once she turned 3 months colics dissapeared. She was sleeping better
Now she is almost seven and sleeping all night. She will wake up once to eat then goes back to bed. Try some soft music that puts my baby to sleep within minutes.
Marimaru
by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 9:35 AM

Sorry, my oldest woke every 2 hours for her first year, and after we were done nursing I'd still need to go in and retuck her in at some point during the night.  

hplesha
by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 9:55 AM
My oldest would get up twice sometimes three times every night for the first 3 years. He's about to be 8 in a month and he now fights with me in the morning to get up for school.
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YzmaRocks
by Platinum Member on Jan. 18, 2013 at 10:32 AM
How often is she getting up at night? Is she cranky/fussy during the day or just at night? How does she nurse during the day?
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erikays
by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 10:59 AM
My youngest would wake up every 2 hrs til she was 18 months :/
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jupiter5
by Member on Jan. 18, 2013 at 11:00 AM


same here we always get 10 hours of sleep together sometimes more and we are both happy and rested

Quoting MommyO2-6631:

We cosleep. I sleep, he eats. Problem solved



IrishIz
by Silver Member on Jan. 18, 2013 at 11:05 AM
3 moms liked this

Honestly...the best advice I can give you is to NOT expect her to sleep through the night.  A 9 month old isn't expected to sleep through the night. Some do...some don't.  This is parenthood...

KylersMom8-16-7
by Gold Member on Jan. 18, 2013 at 11:34 AM
2 moms liked this
Don't do this!

Why Ditch The Infant Cereals?

Perhaps one of the biggest and most frightening crimes against young infants by pediatricians, food marketers, and parents everywhere is the recommendation that young infants should be eating rice cereals or other grains.

Ages ago, when I had my first child, I enrolled in the government program for Women, Infants and Children (commonly known as WIC).

In my first (and only) appointment with the government-provided nutritionist, I learned two things. One, I was anemic. And two, I should start feeding my yet-to-be-born son rice cereal at the age of 4 months. This is a very common assertion backed up with absolutely no science or tradition and perpetuated by food marketers intent on creating a market for industrially-produced infant foods. What’s wrong with infant cereal?

So glad you asked!

It’s not traditional.

In the Food Renegade’s nutritional philosophy, tradition has weight. After all, we’ve survived anywhere from 7,000 to 77,000 generations on this planet (depending on whose science you believe). If we didn’t know how to adequately nourish our children all that time, how did we even get here?

And guess what? Traditional cultures didn’t (and don’t) feed their young babies infant cereal. Among the few cultures who fed their babies a gruel of grains, their practice radically differed from what we do today. First, they only introduced the gruel after the baby was more than a year old. And second, they ensured that the gruel was mildly fermented by soaking the grains for 24 hours or more.

Babies can’t digest it.

In order to digest grains, your body needs to make use of an enzyme called amylase. Amylase is the enzyme responsible for splitting starches. And, guess what? Babies don’t make amylase in large enough quantities to digest grains until after they are a year old at the earliest. Sometimes it can take up to two years. You see, newborns don’t produce amylase at all. Salivary amylase makes a small appearance at about 6 months old, but pancreatic amylase (what you need to actually digest grains) is not produced until molar teeth are fully developed! First molars usually don’t show up until 13-19 months old, on average.

Undigested grains wreak havoc on your baby’s intestinal lining. It can throw off the balance of bacteria in their gut and lead to lots of complications as they age including: food allergies, behavioral problems, mood issues, and more.

What does this mean? Don’t feed your baby grains (or even highly starchy foods), until all of their first molars have emerged. This means no rice cereals, no Cheerios, no Goldfish, no oatmeal, no infant crackers. It means that when you sit down with them at a restaurant, you shouldn’t placate them with the free rolls.

Feeding your baby grains displaces other, more important nutrients.

If you feed your baby cereal or other grains, you’re doing more than simply sticking them with an indigestible food. You’re feeding them an indigestible food in place of something more nutrient-dense. You’re feeding them something their body can’t really use and starving them of the nutrients they need to grow a healthy brain, nervous system, and bone structure. What can you feed your baby instead?

It’s the million dollar question, and the answer isn’t all that hard. It’s based on a few key principles.

First, babies need fat.

More than 50% of the calories in mother’s milk comes from saturated fat. That’s for a good reason. Babies need fat in order to grow their brains, nervous system, and cell membranes. The remaining calories come from protein, and carbohydrates in the form of lactose. (And guess what? Newborns actually make lactase, the enzyme necessary to digest lactose. Plus, lactase is also common in raw milk. So, whatever deficiency in lactase production your baby might have is made up for by the raw mother’s milk you provide them while breastfeeding.) In traditional cultures, it’s common to breastfeed children at least two years and generally well into toddler-hood. So, don’t fret the saturated fat. In fact, you should embrace it!

Second, babies need lots of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, & K.

These vitamins are essential for your baby to grow a strong, sturdy bone structure. They also dramatically affect how your baby’s face forms. If you’re wondering why it matters if your baby has a wide face with high cheekbones versus a narrow face, check out the downloadable handout/workbook in this post.

Traditional baby foods work.

Again, I trust the wisdom of generation after generation of mothers more than I trust marketers trying to sell me an industrial-waste-product-turned-baby-food. We’ve got a long history of nourishing our infants well, pre-industrial revolution (the only exceptions being times of famine or poverty).


Quoting jenemiah:

Is she eating infant cereal yet? My mother used to put infant cereal in our bottles....just like a teaspoon full.  She said that worked well.  Personally I never tried it. I didn't need to my daughter was never a big eater.  My sister said it worked for her daughter as well. Mom and my sister started it at 3 months.  If you choose to try it you will have to find special nipples for the bottle or make the wholes slightly bigger  or they will clog. I would still recommend talking to her pediatrician though.  Maybe they will have some ideas for you.  Its not healthy for you to miss alot of sleep or have so much pain. I hope you find something that works for you. 



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