Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Babies Babies

Help! 8month old refuses anything but the breast

Posted by   + Show Post
My son Miles is a few days shy of being eight months old. He has always been breastfed. I am a stay at home mom, so he has always been able to eat directly from the source. It's not like he would take a bottle of breast milk anyway if he was given the choice. When he turned six months old we stared introducing baby food to him and he was okay with it at first, especially if it was bananas. But that only lasted for about two or three weeks. He caught a little cold around that time and I still tried to get him to eat, though all he wanted to do was nurse. I thought to myself "it will get better after he gets over the cold." A week went by and he started feeling better and he started to eat solids a little better, and we seemed to be on the road to success for a week or two. So I decided that maybe it would be a good idea for him to try finger foods -puffs, peas, small pieces of cooked veggies and meats- and he seemed to be okay with that idea for a little while. About a week ago he started to get his front teeth -at least that's what we are all thinking by the way he acts, classic signs and such- and now whenever I try to give him baby food he freaks out and throws a complete fit. And the majority of the time he does it with finger foods too. I have tried everything I can think of to get him to eat -perfect timing, trickery, entertainment, sister in law veteran of five kids attempt- and nothing is seeming to work. He throws the biggest fit I have ever seen and I do not know what to do anymore. So I'm wondering, do any of you have any tips, tricks, or ideas on ways I could get him to eat more the just nursing?
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 5:03 PM
Replies (11-20):
tyrelsmom
by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 12:22 AM
It probably has to do with teething. I wouldn't worry about it until closer to 1 year. My third NEVER did any more than pick at her food until 10/11 months. And she became a kid who will eat her veggies first, because that's her favorite part of the meal.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
kameka
by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 12:28 AM
1: Hylands' Teething Tablets are your friend
2: Try setting him up in a different situation to eat, just while getting back on track. Offer him things off your plate or on your lap - changing the 'routine' of it may help.
3: take a few days where you don't offer anything to give him a break. You don't want him to develop bad connotations or you'll have a fight on your hands for a long time.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Blue_Spiral
by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 1:39 AM
4 moms liked this


That's simply not true. What studies are you referring to? 

A baby's diet CAN be supplemented with other foods at 6 months, but it is not necessary until 12 months. Breastmilk is not something that needs to be helped, it is the helper of other foods in your baby's system after 6-12 months. 

These might help:

http://infantnutritioncouncil.com/breastmilk-information/

http://kellymom.com/ages/older-infant/ebf-benefits/


I am also very bothered by your perception that a child wanting to nurse makes them "unruly." Breastmilk is necessary until 1 year and extremely beneficial until 2 years and older.

A child desiring to nurse is an instinctual way of getting the nutirition and the bonding that they need.

Maybe he's still not feeling great since being sick and it's comforting to him, as well as helping boost his immune system so it doesn't come back.

The OP also needs to understand that when a baby is sick it is absolutely unnecessary to supplement their diet with anything other than breastmilk. Other foods detract from space in baby's tummy for breastmilk, which is full of antibodies, nutrients and will keep them perfectly hydrated. It is made for sick babies.


Quoting ColeMc3:

I have to disagree with the "wait and see" approach... studies have shown that there is a huge reduction in the nutritional value of nursing once a baby is past 6 mos, sometime around when teeth start coming in. You might be stuck for the moment...I weaned my first child around 4 months, and he was fine with rice cereal and formula. It could be the brand of food you are giving, or even the brand of formula. Different brands = differing flavors and consistencies. I would keep trying, and slowly nurse a little less for every time you are successful with other foods. By going slow but being consistent, you should be able to stop nursing entirely by 1 year.

I would also recommend speaking to a pediatrician or a feeding expert (google it) to see what professional advice they can give you. Just remember, habits of "giving in" to an unruly child turn into lifelong bad habits :-( 


shortyali
by Bronze Member on Jan. 19, 2013 at 7:14 AM
1 mom liked this
What studies? According to WHO babies should be nursed until age 2 with solids after 6 months. And even then before the first birthday solids are just for fun. After 1 breast milk helps fill the gaps that food leaves. I would love to see your studies.

OP - I would back off for now on solids and try again in a week or so.


Quoting ColeMc3:

I have to disagree with the "wait and see" approach... studies have shown that there is a huge reduction in the nutritional value of nursing once a baby is past 6 mos, sometime around when teeth start coming in. You might be stuck for the moment...I weaned my first child around 4 months, and he was fine with rice cereal and formula. It could be the brand of food you are giving, or even the brand of formula. Different brands = differing flavors and consistencies. I would keep trying, and slowly nurse a little less for every time you are successful with other foods. By going slow but being consistent, you should be able to stop nursing entirely by 1 year.

I would also recommend speaking to a pediatrician or a feeding expert (google it) to see what professional advice they can give you. Just remember, habits of "giving in" to an unruly child turn into lifelong bad habits :-( 

Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Jaddie
by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 9:08 AM
3 moms liked this
Thank you ladies. I'm going to back off for a few days because I don't plan on weaning him anytime soon.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
MommyO2-6631
by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 9:59 AM
If he doesn't want it there is no reason to force him.... anyone have that article about how to tell if you're overfeeding your child?? If he turns away or shows signs that he doesn't want it then stop. He'll eat when he's ready
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
KylersMom8-16-7
by Gold Member on Jan. 19, 2013 at 10:46 AM
2 moms liked this
This is just UNINFORMED and WRONG!

Studies actually prove breastmilk to ALWAYS be beneficial.

Breastfeeding contributes to your child’s NUTRITION

Although there has been little research done on children who breastfeed beyond the age of two, the available information indicates that breastfeeding continues to be a valuable source of nutrition and disease protection for as long as breastfeeding continues.

“Human milk expressed by mothers who have been lactating for >1 year has significantly increased fat and energy contents, compared with milk expressed by women who have been lactating for shorter periods. During prolonged lactation, the fat energy contribution of breast milk to the infant diet might be significant.” – Mandel 2005

In a study of 250 toddlers in western Kenya, breastmilk provided, on average, 32% of the child’s total energy intake. “Breast milk made an important contribution to the fat and vitamin A intakes of toddlers in this community.” – Onyango 2002

“Breast milk continues to provide substantial amounts of key nutrients well beyond the first year of life, especially protein, fat, and most vitamins.” – Dewey 2001

In the second year (12-23 months), 448 mL of breastmilk provides: 29% of energy requirements 43% of protein requirements 36% of calcium requirements 75% of vitamin A requirements 76% of folate requirements 94% of vitamin B12 requirements 60% of vitamin C requirements – Dewey 2001

Studies done in rural Bangladesh have shown that breastmilk continues to be an important source of vitamin A in the second and third year of life. – Persson 1998

It’s not uncommon for weaning to be recommended for toddlers who are eating few solids. However, this recommendation is not supported by research. Research does indicate that in situations where breastfed toddlers have an increased risk of malnutrition, this appears to be due to inadequate complementary feeding or reverse causality (the mother is more likely to continue breastfeeding a child who is ill or growing poorly). In one study of 250 toddlers in Kenya, solid food intake increased after weaning, but not enough to replace all the fat, vitamin A, and niacin that the child had been getting via breastfeeding (Onyango 2002). According to Sally Kneidel in “Nursing Beyond One Year” (New Beginnings, Vol. 6 No. 4, July-August 1990, pp. 99-103.): Some doctors may feel that nursing will interfere with a child’s appetite for other foods. Yet there has been no documentation that nursing children are more likely than weaned children to refuse supplementary foods. In fact, most researchers in Third World countries, where a malnourished toddler’s appetite may be of critical importance, recommend continued nursing for even the severely malnourished (Briend et al, 1988; Rhode, 1988; Shattock and Stephens, 1975; Whitehead, 1985). Most suggest helping the malnourished older nursing child not by weaning but by supplementing the mother’s diet to improve the nutritional quality of her milk (Ahn and MacLean. 1980; Jelliffe and Jelliffe, 1978) and by offering the child more varied and more palatable foods to improve his or her appetite (Rohde, 1988; Tangermann, 1988; Underwood, 1985).

Breastfeeding contributes to your child’s HEALTH

The American Academy of Family Physicians notes that children weaned before two years of age are at increased risk of illness (AAFP 2008).

Breastfeeding toddlers between the ages of one and three have been found to have fewer illnesses, illnesses of shorter duration, and lower mortality rates (Mølbak 1994, van den Bogaard 1991, Gulick 1986).

“Antibodies are abundant in human milk throughout lactation” (Nutrition During Lactation 1991; p. 134). In fact, some of the immune factors in breastmilk increase in concentration during the second year and also during the weaning process. (Lawrence & Lawrence 2011, Goldman 1983, Goldman & Goldblum 1983, Institute of Medicine 1991).

Per the World Health Organization, “a modest increase in breastfeeding rates could prevent up to 10% of all deaths of children under five: Breastfeeding plays an essential and sometimes underestimated role in the treatment and prevention of childhood illness.” [emphasis added]

Breastfeeding contributes to your child’s INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT

Extensive research on the relationship between cognitive achievement (IQ scores, grades in school) and breastfeeding has shown the greatest gains for those children breastfed the longest.

Breastfeeding contributes to your child’s MENTAL and SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

A couple of studies have shown a positive relationship between longer breastfeeding duration and social development. – Duazo 2010, Baumgartner 1984

“A shorter duration of breastfeeding may be a predictor of adverse mental health outcomes throughout the developmental trajectory of childhood and early adolescence.” – Oddy 2010

According to Elizabeth N. Baldwin, Esq. in “Extended Breastfeeding and the Law”: “Breastfeeding is a warm and loving way to meet the needs of toddlers and young children. It not only perks them up and energizes them; it also soothes the frustrations, bumps and bruises, and daily stresses of early childhood. In addition, nursing past infancy helps little ones make a gradual transition to childhood.“

Baldwin continues: “Meeting a child’s dependency needs is the key to helping that child achieve independence. And children outgrow these needs according to their own unique timetable.” Children who achieve independence at their own pace are more secure in that independence then children forced into independence prematurely.

Breastfeeding your child past infancy is NORMAL

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that “Breastfeeding should be continued for at least the first year of life and beyond for as long as mutually desired by mother and child… Increased duration of breastfeeding confers significant health and developmental benefits for the child and the mother… There is no upper limit to the duration of breastfeeding and no evidence of psychologic or developmental harm from breastfeeding into the third year of life or longer.” (AAP 2012, AAP 2005)

The American Academy of Family Physicians recommends that breastfeeding continue throughout the first year of life and that “As recommended by the WHO, breastfeeding should ideally continue beyond infancy, but this is not the cultural norm in the United States and requires ongoing support and encouragement. It has been estimated that a natural weaning age for humans is between two and seven years. Family physicians should be knowledgeable regarding the ongoing benefits to the child of extended breastfeeding, including continued immune protection, better social adjustment, and having a sustainable food source in times of emergency. The longer women breastfeed, the greater the decrease in their risk of breast cancer.” They also note that “If the child is younger than two years of age, the child is at increased risk of illness if weaned.” (AAFP 2008) The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine affirms breastfeeding beyond infancy as the biological norm. “The average age at weaning ranges anywhere from six months to five years… Claims that breastfeeding beyond infancy is harmful to mother or infant have absolutely no medical or scientific basis,” says Arthur Eidelman, MD, president of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine. “Indeed, the more salient issue is the damage caused by modern practices of premature weaning.” The global organization of physicians further notes that “Human milk contains nutrients, antibodies, and immune-modulating substances that are not present in infant formula or cow’s milk. Longer breastfeeding duration is further associated with reduced maternal risks of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and heart attack.” (ABM 2012)

A US Surgeon General has stated that it is a lucky baby who continues to nurse until age two. (Novello 1990)

The World Health Organization emphasizes the importance of nursing up to two years of age or beyond (WHO 1993, WHO 2002).

Scientific research by Katherine A. Dettwyler, PhD shows that 2.5 to 7.0 years of nursing is what our children have been designed to expect (Dettwyler 95)

M OTHERS also benefit from breastfeeding for a longer duration

Extended nursing delays the return of fertility in some women by suppressing ovulation (References).

Breastfeeding reduces the risk of breast cancer (References). Studies have found a significant inverse association between duration of lactation and breast cancer risk.

Breastfeeding also reduces the risk of ovarian cancer (References), uterine cancer (References), and endometrial cancer (References).

Breastfeeding protects against osteoporosis. During lactation a mother may experience decreases of bone mineral. A nursing mom’s bone mineral density may be reduced in the whole body by 1 to 2 percent while she is still nursing. This is gained back, and bone mineral density may actually increase, when the baby is weaned from the breast. This is not dependent on additional calcium supplementation in the mother’s diet. (References).

Breastfeeding reduces the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (References).

Breastfeeding reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (References).

Breastfeeding has been shown to decrease insulin requirements in diabetic women. There is also a decreased risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus in mothers who do not have a history of gestational diabetes (References).

Breastfeeding moms may lose weight easier (References).









Quoting ColeMc3:

I have to disagree with the "wait and see" approach... studies have shown that there is a huge reduction in the nutritional value of nursing once a baby is past 6 mos, sometime around when teeth start coming in. You might be stuck for the moment...I weaned my first child around 4 months, and he was fine with rice cereal and formula. It could be the brand of food you are giving, or even the brand of formula. Different brands = differing flavors and consistencies. I would keep trying, and slowly nurse a little less for every time you are successful with other foods. By going slow but being consistent, you should be able to stop nursing entirely by 1 year.

I would also recommend speaking to a pediatrician or a feeding expert (google it) to see what professional advice they can give you. Just remember, habits of "giving in" to an unruly child turn into lifelong bad habits :-( 


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
KylersMom8-16-7
by Gold Member on Jan. 19, 2013 at 10:51 AM
1 mom liked this
OP My son was exclusively breastfed 13 months because he didn't want solids. They made him gag and throw up. One day he was just ready and at 16 months he's mostly breastfeeding but he's perfectly healthy.

Read this:

Some toddlers are eating very few solids, or even no solids, at 12 months. This is not unusual and really depends on your child – there is quite a big variation. We like to see breastmilk making up the majority (around 75%) of baby’s diet at 12 months. Some babies will be taking more solids by 12 months, but others will still be exclusively or almost-exclusively breastfed at this point. It is normal for baby to keep breastmilk as the primary part of his diet up until 18 months or even longer. An example of a nice gradual increase in solids would be 25% solids at 12 months, 50% solids at 18 months, and 80% solids at 24 months.

Some children take a little longer to begin taking solids well. Some of them have food sensitivities and this may be their body’s way of protecting them until their digestive system can handle more. Others are late teethers or have a lot of difficulty with teething pain. At this point there is NOTHING that your milk lacks that your child needs, with the possible exception of enough iron. As long as his iron levels are within acceptable levels and when he does eat you are offering him foods naturally rich in iron, then you have plenty of time before you need to worry about the amount of solids he’s getting.

All you need to do is to continue to offer foods. Don’t worry if he’s not interested or takes very small amounts. Your only true responsibility is what you offer, when you offer it and how you offer it, not whether or not he eats it. That has to be up to him. Trying to force, coax, or cajole your child into eating is never recommended. Continue to nurse on demand, day and night, and trust your child to increase the solids when he’s ready. As baby slowly moves into eating more solids, your milk will fill any nutritional gaps nicely.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
ColeMc3
by on Jan. 19, 2013 at 4:32 PM

Sorry hun, didn't mean to sound snippy. Here is a short resource posted by a pediatrics physician.

http://pediatrics.about.com/cs/breastfeeding/a/starting_slds.htm

I'm not saying that there is no nutrional value at all past six months, it's just reduced. Babies start to need more iron, and other nutrients that may not be passing in the necessary amounts through breastmilk exclusively. I can look for some other studies, but google is really great for that. I hope this helps and I am by no means a doctor or expert. I just like to read :-)


KylersMom8-16-7
by Gold Member on Jan. 19, 2013 at 6:36 PM
This article is REALLY outdated.

The AAP guidelines state no solids before 6 months (other RELIABLE sources state offering later is fine too.)

A baby should sit completely unassisted.

Not automatically push food out(lost tongue thrust reflex.)

Use thumb and fingers in pincher grasp to pick up small foods.

The ONLY nutrient that is lower but NOT lacking is iron.

MYTH: Baby needs to start solids because there is not enough iron in breastmilk.

An additional reason given for starting solids is the “lack of iron in breastmilk.” Breastmilk does have lower iron levels than formula, but the iron in breastmilk is more readily absorbed by the baby’s gut than the iron in formula. Also, formula-fed babies tend to lose iron through fissures that develop in their intestines as a result of damage from cow’s milk. Breastfed babies do not lose this iron. Sometime after the first 6 months (much later for a lot of babies), most babies will require an additional source of iron other than mother’s milk. This can most often be obtained through small amounts of solid food.

Breastmilk is perfect. A mother can eat junk food all day but her milk will be healthy. A mother could be starving and her body would take nutrients from her body for her milk to make sure her child is well nourished.

Another cause of anemia in infants is feeding iron fortified cereals which block the natural iron from absorbing, another reason not to use cereals first but I won't go into that...



Quoting ColeMc3:

Sorry hun, didn't mean to sound snippy. Here is a short resource posted by a pediatrics physician.

http://pediatrics.about.com/cs/breastfeeding/a/starting_slds.htm

I'm not saying that there is no nutrional value at all past six months, it's just reduced. Babies start to need more iron, and other nutrients that may not be passing in the necessary amounts through breastmilk exclusively. I can look for some other studies, but google is really great for that. I hope this helps and I am by no means a doctor or expert. I just like to read :-)



Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)