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Breast pumping????

Posted by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 9:39 PM
  • 33 Replies
I had my baby girl on jan 31 and u want to breastfeed... So I got out the breast pump and started pumping... Well I need to know how long I should pump? I have never done this and am not sure as to how long to do this lol... But I really want her breast feed... I have not tried with her cause I was just going to bottle feed but if I can do this u really want to... I couldn't not breast feed my son and was very heart broken about it I never produced milk but I feel like I can do it this time... Any advice is appreciated thanks!!!
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by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 9:39 PM
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momto1ryen
by Bronze Member on Feb. 4, 2013 at 10:14 PM

 I'm sorry I'm a bit confused. Let me try and see if I have this. You want to bf dd however you haven't tried yet, but you are pumping however you do want to nurse? Why is it you haven't tried nursing yet if that's what you want?

sunshinepraying
by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 10:18 PM
You may want to ask the breastfeeding group as well. They're great with this stuff.

I would go ahead and try bf'ing if you want to do it. See how baby does. I'm trying to remember how often I pumped, although of you want to soley bf, then you don't have to pump if you don't want to
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amiesmomma
by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 10:26 PM

You don't need to pump this early.  If baby latches, just nurse at the breast to establish your milk supply.  nursing frequently stimulates milk production

Dakotasmomma12
by on Feb. 4, 2013 at 10:27 PM
I was not even going to try because I tried with my son and when I could not produce milk I felt horrible and cried. I felt like I had failed him... But since I had my daughter my boobs have been really sore. So my friend suggested me pumping to ease the soreness and I figured if it worked and I produced milk this time I could go ahead and breastfeed her... So I was wondering how often to pump and for how long until a good supply comes in... I am going to nurse my daughter I just want to make sure I produce this time and can do this...


Quoting momto1ryen:

 I'm sorry I'm a bit confused. Let me try and see if I have this. You want to bf dd however you haven't tried yet, but you are pumping however you do want to nurse? Why is it you haven't tried nursing yet if that's what you want?


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Baby_Avas_Momma
by Gold Member on Feb. 4, 2013 at 10:29 PM
5 moms liked this
Put her to the breast! NOTHING is as efficient as a baby. Pumping to bring in a supply when you could be nursing is doing you no good mama.

Quoting Dakotasmomma12:

I was not even going to try because I tried with my son and when I could not produce milk I felt horrible and cried. I felt like I had failed him... But since I had my daughter my boobs have been really sore. So my friend suggested me pumping to ease the soreness and I figured if it worked and I produced milk this time I could go ahead and breastfeed her... So I was wondering how often to pump and for how long until a good supply comes in... I am going to nurse my daughter I just want to make sure I produce this time and can do this...




Quoting momto1ryen:

 I'm sorry I'm a bit confused. Let me try and see if I have this. You want to bf dd however you haven't tried yet, but you are pumping however you do want to nurse? Why is it you haven't tried nursing yet if that's what you want?


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momto1ryen
by Bronze Member on Feb. 4, 2013 at 10:36 PM

 Ok got it thanks! Honestly my suggestion would be to put the pump down and try nursing first. She's only a few days old so she's still learning a bottle so it's better now for her to try and learn the breast. True nursing breast stimulation will also prooduce milk much better than a pump. I would try and work on getting her to latch to help produce and it would probably benefit to see a lactation consultant to help with this if she has a hard time. Of course pump if she won't latch to keep up with your milk, but I would really push the breast first. I really hope it works for you!!!

Quoting Dakotasmomma12:

I was not even going to try because I tried with my son and when I could not produce milk I felt horrible and cried. I felt like I had failed him... But since I had my daughter my boobs have been really sore. So my friend suggested me pumping to ease the soreness and I figured if it worked and I produced milk this time I could go ahead and breastfeed her... So I was wondering how often to pump and for how long until a good supply comes in... I am going to nurse my daughter I just want to make sure I produce this time and can do this...


Quoting momto1ryen:

 I'm sorry I'm a bit confused. Let me try and see if I have this. You want to bf dd however you haven't tried yet, but you are pumping however you do want to nurse? Why is it you haven't tried nursing yet if that's what you want?


 

KylersMom8-16-7
by Gold Member on Feb. 4, 2013 at 11:18 PM
2 moms liked this
Don't pump nurse! She'll be the best thing to establish and maintain supply.

Get her to breast now. Since she's gotten bottles it may be a bit of a battle because of nipple preference.

Read this!:

Breastfeeding your newborn — what to expect in the early weeks

SEPTEMBER 2, 2011. Posted in: BREASTFEEDING BASICS,WHAT IS NORMAL?

By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC

The First Week

How often should baby be nursing?

Frequent nursing encourages good milk supply and reduces engorgement. Aim for nursing at least 10 – 12 times per day (24 hours). You CAN’T nurse too often–you CAN nurse too little.

Nurse at the first signs of hunger (stirring, rooting, hands in mouth)–don’t wait until baby is crying. Allow baby unlimited time at the breast when sucking actively, then offer the second breast. Some newborns are excessively sleepy at first–wake baby to nurse if 2 hours (during the day) or 4 hours (at night) have passed without nursing.

Is baby getting enough milk?

Weight gain: Normal newborns may lose up to 7% of birth weight in the first few days. After mom’s milk comes in, the average breastfed baby gains 6 oz/week (170 g/week). Take baby for a weight check at the end of the first week or beginning of the second week. Consult with baby’s doctor and your lactation consultant if baby is not gaining as expected.

Dirty diapers: In the early days, baby typically has one dirty diaper for each day of life (1 on day one, 2 on day two…). After day 4, stools should be yellow and baby should have at least 3-4 stools daily that are the size of a US quarter (2.5 cm) or larger. Some babies stool every time they nurse, or even more often–this is normal, too. The normal stool of a breastfed baby is loose (soft to runny) and may be seedy or curdy.

Wet diapers: In the early days, baby typically has one wet diaper for each day of life (1 on day one, 2 on day two…). Once mom’s milk comes in, expect 5-6+ wet diapers every 24 hours. To feel what a sufficiently wet diaper is like, pour 3 tablespoons (45 mL) of water into a clean diaper. A piece of tissue in a disposable diaper will help you determine if the diaper is wet.

Breast changes

Your milk should start to “come in” (increase in quantity and change from colostrum to mature milk) between days 2 and 5. To minimize engorgement: nurse often, don’t skip feedings (even at night), ensure good latch/positioning, and let baby finish the first breast before offering the other side. To decrease discomfort from engorgement, use cold and/or cabbage leaf compresses between feedings. If baby is having trouble latching due to engorgement, use reverse pressure softening or express milk until the nipple is soft, then try latching again.

Call your doctor, midwife and/or lactation consultant if:

Baby is having no wet or dirty diapers

Baby has dark colored urine after day 3(should be pale yellow to clear)

Baby has dark colored stools after day 4(should be mustard yellow, with no meconium)

Baby has fewer wet/soiled diapers or nurses less frequently than the goals listed here

Mom has symptoms of mastitis(sore breast with fever, chills, flu-like aching)

Weeks two through six

How often should baby be nursing?

Frequent nursing in the early weeks is important for establishing a good milk supply. Most newborns need to nurse 8 – 12+ times per day (24 hours). You CAN’T nurse too often—you CAN nurse too little.

Nurse at the first signs of hunger (stirring, rooting, hands in mouth)—don’t wait until baby is crying. Allow baby unlimited time at the breast when sucking actively, then offer the second breast. Some newborns are excessively sleepy—wake baby to nurse if 2 hours (during the day) or 4 hours (at night) have passed without nursing. Once baby has established a good weight gain pattern, you can stop waking baby and nurse on baby’s cues alone.

The following things are normal:

Frequent and/or long feedings.

Varying nursing pattern from day to day.

Cluster nursing (very frequent to constant nursing) for several hours—usually evenings—each day. This may coincide with the normal “fussy time” that most babies have in the early months.

Growth spurts, where baby nurses more often than usual for several days and may act very fussy. Common growth spurt times in the early weeks are the first few days at home, 7 – 10 days, 2 – 3 weeks and 4 – 6 weeks.

Is baby getting enough milk?

Weight gain: The average breastfed newborn gains 6 ounces/week (170 grams/week). Consult with baby’s doctor and your lactation consultant if baby is not gaining as expected.

Dirty diapers: Expect 3-4+ stools daily that are the size of a US quarter (2.5 cm) or larger. Some babies stool every time they nurse, or even more often–this is normal, too. The normal stool of a breastfed baby is yellow and loose (soft to runny) and may be seedy or curdy. After 4 – 6 weeks, some babies stool less frequently, with stools as infrequent as one every 7-10 days. As long as baby is gaining well, this is normal.

Wet diapers: Expect 5-6+ wet diapers every 24 hours. To feel what a sufficiently wet diaper is like, pour 3 tablespoons (45 mL) of water into a clean diaper. A piece of tissue in a disposable diaper will help you determine if the diaper is wet. After 6 weeks, wet diapers may drop to 4-5/day but amount of urine will increase to 4-6+ tablespoons (60-90+ mL) as baby’s bladder capacity grows.

Milk supply?

Some moms worry about milk supply. As long as baby is gaining well on mom’s milk alone, then milk supply is good. Between weight checks, a sufficient number of wet and dirty diapers will indicate that baby is getting enough milk.



Quoting Dakotasmomma12:

I was not even going to try because I tried with my son and when I could not produce milk I felt horrible and cried. I felt like I had failed him... But since I had my daughter my boobs have been really sore. So my friend suggested me pumping to ease the soreness and I figured if it worked and I produced milk this time I could go ahead and breastfeed her... So I was wondering how often to pump and for how long until a good supply comes in... I am going to nurse my daughter I just want to make sure I produce this time and can do this...




Quoting momto1ryen:

 I'm sorry I'm a bit confused. Let me try and see if I have this. You want to bf dd however you haven't tried yet, but you are pumping however you do want to nurse? Why is it you haven't tried nursing yet if that's what you want?



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Pam1981
by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 12:27 AM

If you are pumping to try and help your milk come in, you should do 20 minutes each side.  If you have a double pump you can use, and are able to do so, it is supposed to make is easier.  You should pump every 2-3 hours. Putting baby to the breast is the best thing to get it going though.

MixedCooke
by Gold Member on Feb. 5, 2013 at 1:49 AM

you want to breastfeed her but you havent tried getting her to latch?  Or you just want to pump?  Well I loved my MEDELA electric double pump and would knock ot both in 15 minutes, 20 minutes maximum.  FENUGREEK increased my milk supply to the point that I had over 40 ounces in the freezer and was looking to donate my excess.  Adding a little saliva around the pump suction/breast helped for better suction.

Dakotasmomma12
by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 1:52 AM
And when I put her to the breast how long should I pump on each??? I really want to do this. My husband is very supportive but has this suggestion to breat and formula feed and frankly I want to breast feed and he gets that but he knows how impatient I am but I feel like I I do this it could help me relax a little to sit down with dd and do this... I just wish I could have done it with ds.


Quoting Pam1981:

If you are pumping to try and help your milk come in, you should do 20 minutes each side.  If you have a double pump you can use, and are able to do so, it is supposed to make is easier.  You should pump every 2-3 hours. Putting baby to the breast is the best thing to get it going though.


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