Advertisement
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

advice? trying to get 14 month old to sleep in crib!

Posted by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 6:12 PM
  • 8 Replies
My daughter is 14 months old. She sleeps with me at night.
She has since she was a week old.
I'm currently pregnant with my next child and would like for my daughter to be able to sleep in her own crib before this baby is born in August.
I've tried the cry it out method and it doesn't seem to work.
I would appreciate any advice or suggestions that may help.
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 6:12 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-8):
PerfectAccident
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 6:55 PM

BUMP!

cabrandy03
by Brandy on Feb. 21, 2013 at 7:22 PM
1 mom liked this

Maybe skip the crib and get a toddler bed, that way you can start out with the mattress right next to yours so that it almost feels like being in bed with you.  Once she gets comfortable with that you can slowly start moving the mattress further from your bed and eventually into her own room.

abra
by Abra on Feb. 21, 2013 at 9:22 PM
1 mom liked this

This is what worked well for my family:

"

An Introduction to Compassionate CIO Sleep Training

You've probably heard of Compassionate CIO (CCIO) and it can work well for a lot of people. CCIO is gentle, but is not the quickest solution you can find. The method suggests lots of reassurance and checking on your child so that your child learns to sleep by himself but with the minimum of distress possible. One of the nice things about CCIO is you are able to choose a progression pace to fit your needs. There is no perfect age to start and no rules about how long to allow controlled crying. You are the mom. You know what is best. 

The general idea of CCIO is that you go through your bedtime routine to prepare them for sleep. You are able to pick exactly what your routine is, but commonly a bath, reading or singing and meal are involved. After you have completed your bedtime routine, you lay your baby down in a safe crib or pack n play and shut the door behind you as you leave. You leave them to cry for a short time  (intervals are custom to child's needs) and then you can go in their room if/when they become anything more then mad at the situation. You know your baby's cry. If they  become frightened or something besides just angry, you go in, pick up your baby and comfort them until they are peaceful and ready to go to sleep, again. At which time, you lay your baby back down again and repeat the cycle.  It is, essentially, teaching your baby to go to sleep and eventually stay asleep without you. The benefits of starting sleep training younger is simply that they aren't as set in their habits, which helps minimize distress for everyone, but what age you start training is 100% up to you.

The downside of CCIO is that any crying can be distressing for your child and for you. There is no way around it. Allowing your child to cry is difficult - they want you and you're not going to them straight away and you're not picking them up as you would normally. But it is important to note that CCIO is attending to all your baby's needs (comfort, food, cleanliness) but is not indulging all of their wants (to be held or to nurse while they sleep, which ultimately is very difficult on mommy). CCIO is unique in that it achieves a healthy balance between indulgent and severe sleep training methods. 

After a number of nights the crying gradually lessens and finally your child will then go to sleep by themselves. Once you reach this stage everyone of course feels much better! Everyone gets more sleep and everyone has more energy. When you are training younger babies, you will still need to get up with them at night to feed them, but after they are fed, burped and clean again, you will start CCIO cycle again. 

The initial stages are tough for everyone. You need to agree with yourself and partner that you are going to let your child cry for an agreed amount of time and not give in until that pre-determined time. If you cannot do this, then CCIO is not the method for you. Inconsistency will only be upsetting for your child and will not help the sleep problem. 

Before you start any sleep training program always check with your medical professional that your child is well and healthy and that his/her sleep issues are not a sign of any underlying problem. "

http://www.cafemom.com/group/113812

jridgill
by Sapphire Member on Feb. 21, 2013 at 10:13 PM
I did this with my last at the same age.
I put her crib in my room and beside my bed. I would put her in the crib and put my hand inside so she could hold it. She cried for 4 nights. We didn't have any problems after that. We slowly moved her crib away from the bed. She did great.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
CelestialSong
by on Feb. 21, 2013 at 11:10 PM
My daughter moved from our bed to a regular bed when she turned 1. It worked out very well. Since she was already used to falling asleep with me laying next to her or nursing her, there was no problem doing that in her own bed instead of mine. No crying needed :) When she falls asleep I just get up. Her bed is basically a twin sized mattress right on the floor.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
samarie23
by on Feb. 22, 2013 at 10:58 AM
Thank you all for your advice!
abra
by Abra on Feb. 22, 2013 at 11:19 AM

Best of luck! 

Quoting samarie23:

Thank you all for your advice!



.....Ophelia Grace...............Mira Lorne...............Jude Bennett.........Liam Daniel Baines.


la_bella_vita
by Bella on Feb. 22, 2013 at 10:06 PM
1 mom liked this

 I started with the crib next to our bed. Good luck!

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)