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Whole milk to formula

Posted by on Apr. 8, 2013 at 11:03 PM
  • 17 Replies

Hello I have a question about my 16 month old drinking formula after milk! He has been drinking whole milk since he was 12 months but I am out of whole milk but I do have formula (0-12months) in my home, I was wondering if it was okay for him to drink the formula for a lilttle while instead of the whole milk?

by on Apr. 8, 2013 at 11:03 PM
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Replies (1-10):
jackiewal10
by Silver Member on Apr. 8, 2013 at 11:10 PM
3 moms liked this

I don't think it would HURT him...  But why not just give water until you can get milk?  He doesn't NEED milk everyday.  A day or two of not having milk isn't going to be a big deal.  After not having formula for so long, he probably won't like it.  Milk is a lot sweeter.  Formula tastes....bad.  (If it tastes anything like it smells.)

abra
by Abra on Apr. 8, 2013 at 11:12 PM

It should be fine. I use both. I would avoid water, though. Babies can get water poisioning very easily since their systems are so tiny. 

jackiewal10
by Silver Member on Apr. 8, 2013 at 11:16 PM
2 moms liked this

Not at 16 months old.  Water after 6 months is fine is small amounts and fine after 12 months in any amount.

Quoting abra:

It should be fine. I use both. I would avoid water, though. Babies can get water poisioning very easily since their systems are so tiny. 


abra
by Abra on Apr. 8, 2013 at 11:18 PM

There is no reason to offer water unless the baby is overweight or they are going to bed with a sippy. Why waste an opportunity to offer nutrition? 

Quoting jackiewal10:

Not at 16 months old.  Water after 6 months is fine is small amounts and fine after 12 months in any amount.

Quoting abra:

It should be fine. I use both. I would avoid water, though. Babies can get water poisioning very easily since their systems are so tiny. 



"Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children the dragons can be killed." - GK Chesterton 

jackiewal10
by Silver Member on Apr. 8, 2013 at 11:24 PM
1 mom liked this

Um no... after the age of one, even a baby needs water to keep hydrated.  If they are still nursing, that will also hydrate.  Milk doesn't hydrate, so regardless, water is needed. Yes, milk has some nutrition in it, but nothing that can't be gained from foods for a short time while water is given (until milk could be purchased).  What about all those babies who never get milk or dairy in their diets.  They eat and drink other things and get the same amount of nutrition.

Quoting abra:

There is no reason to offer water unless the baby is overweight or they are going to bed with a sippy. Why waste an opportunity to offer nutrition? 

Quoting jackiewal10:

Not at 16 months old.  Water after 6 months is fine is small amounts and fine after 12 months in any amount.

Quoting abra:

It should be fine. I use both. I would avoid water, though. Babies can get water poisioning very easily since their systems are so tiny. 




abra
by Abra on Apr. 8, 2013 at 11:32 PM
1 mom liked this

Fluid to stay hydrated, not necessarily water. Most liquids (alcoholic ones excepted) are hydrants. Babies who can't drink dairy must take special care to get the nutrients they would have gotten from milk from other sources. 


Got Milk? The Benefits of Milk for Kids

Get the fact on why your children should drink milk, how much, and what kind. Plus, learn about how DHA-rich foods for kids.

By Daryn Eller

When we were growing up, the case for milk was clear: It was good for you, your parents told you to drink it (which you did or, defiantly, didn't), end of story. Since then, researchers have been taking a closer look at the benefits of dairy products, and this has confused the issue of how much kids need, when they need it, and what kind they should get. The facts:

When do infants need milk?
Cow's milk isn't digested well by babies under 12 months, and it lacks essential nutrients supplied by breast milk and formula. So hold off on introducing it until your baby's at least a year old. (The cow's milk in cow's milk-based formula is safe for babies.)

Then what? Whole or low-fat?
Until your child is 2, whole milk. "He needs the fat for nerve and brain development," says Frank Greer, M.D., chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics's Committee on Nutrition. A possible exception: If your child's gaining weight too quickly for his height, your pediatrician may recommend switching to low-fat milk before age 2.
Otherwise, switch to 1- or 2-percent milk at age 2 to move your child closer to a diet with moderate amounts of fat and cholesterol. As long as he doesn't have a weight problem, he can drink 1 or 2 percent indefinitely, rather than switching to skim. Kids need the fat for nerve development for many years.

Milk is good for my child's bones, right?
Despite common wisdom, recent research looking at the long-term bone-building effects of dairy products has produced mixed results. "But we do know that three factors determine strong bones: genetics, physical activity, and calcium," says Dr. Greer. "And milk is the number one source of calcium." Milk is also fortified with vitamin D, another important player in bone health, and it has other vital nutrients, including protein, phosphorous, vitamin A, and some B vitamins. Bottom line: Milk is good for bones, but other factors matter, too.

How much is enough?
Recent U.S. dietary guidelines have raised the number of recommended servings of dairy products from two to three a day for kids between 4 and 8. It's still two servings a day for kids under 4. (For kids 9 to 18, it's four servings.) One cup of milk or yogurt or 1.5 ounces of cheese (equivalent to six dice-size cubes) counts as a serving.
But keep in mind that all dairy products are not created equal. Yogurt, for instance, has more protein and sometimes has more calcium than milk, but it's rarely fortified with vitamin D.

Can milk keep my child thin?
The jury is still out on this, particularly for kids. Some studies have shown that the more dairy foods they consume, the less body fat they put on over time. Yet a recent Harvard study found that young children who drank more than three servings of milk a day gained more weight over a period of one year  -- whether they drank whole or low-fat milk. Helaine Rockett, one of the study authors, thinks it's wise to keep milk drinking in perspective. "Milk is healthy, but it does have calories. If your child is overweight, switch him to water once he meets his servings of dairy for the day."

So you can have too much of a good thing?
Yup. In addition to the extra calories, too much milk can fill kids up, increasing the likelihood that they forgo other nutrient-rich foods. So limit your child to the recommended servings per day and make sure he gets a wide variety of nutritious foods.

What if my child just doesn't like it?
There aren't many foods that offer the same package of nutrients, but there are other sources of calcium. Besides other dairy foods, fortified OJ, fortified tofu, white beans, and broccoli, some cereals and cereal bars are fortified with it. Before you give up on milk, though, try offering the flavored kind. The extra sugar is a worthy trade-off for milk's nutrients.

http://www.parenting.com/article/got-milk

Quoting jackiewal10:

Um no... after the age of one, even a baby needs water to keep hydrated.  If they are still nursing, that will also hydrate.  Milk doesn't hydrate, so regardless, water is needed. Yes, milk has some nutrition in it, but nothing that can't be gained from foods for a short time while water is given (until milk could be purchased).  What about all those babies who never get milk or dairy in their diets.  They eat and drink other things and get the same amount of nutrition.

Quoting abra:

There is no reason to offer water unless the baby is overweight or they are going to bed with a sippy. Why waste an opportunity to offer nutrition? 

Quoting jackiewal10:

Not at 16 months old.  Water after 6 months is fine is small amounts and fine after 12 months in any amount.

Quoting abra:

It should be fine. I use both. I would avoid water, though. Babies can get water poisioning very easily since their systems are so tiny. 





"Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children the dragons can be killed." - GK Chesterton 

jackiewal10
by Silver Member on Apr. 8, 2013 at 11:40 PM
2 moms liked this

Yep!  Done with you.  AGAIN.  Your response to me isn't even relevant.  I wasn't arguing about milk in general.  (Reading comprehension is not your friend.)  OP said that she was out of milk.  Not that she was never going to give it.  Water IS an acceptable alternative for the short term.  While formula probably wouldn't hurt (as long as it isn't expired), it also doesn't have the proper nutrients for an infant over the age of 12 months.  That's why you stop feeding it after the age of 12 months.  Giving me the benefits of milk....not conducive to your "argument".  Stop always twisting "facts" trying to make is seem like you know what you're talking about.  It doesn't make you look smart.  Especially when that source that you did provide (I notice there is no link) sounds a little dated.

Quoting abra:

Fluid to stay hydrated, not necessarily water. Most liquids (alcoholic ones excepted) are hydrants. Babies who can't drink dairy must take special care to get the nutrients they would have gotten from milk from other sources. 


Got Milk? The Benefits of Milk for Kids

Get the fact on why your children should drink milk, how much, and what kind. Plus, learn about how DHA-rich foods for kids.

By Daryn Eller

When we were growing up, the case for milk was clear: It was good for you, your parents told you to drink it (which you did or, defiantly, didn't), end of story. Since then, researchers have been taking a closer look at the benefits of dairy products, and this has confused the issue of how much kids need, when they need it, and what kind they should get. The facts:

When do infants need milk?
Cow's milk isn't digested well by babies under 12 months, and it lacks essential nutrients supplied by breast milk and formula. So hold off on introducing it until your baby's at least a year old. (The cow's milk in cow's milk-based formula is safe for babies.)

Then what? Whole or low-fat?
Until your child is 2, whole milk. "He needs the fat for nerve and brain development," says Frank Greer, M.D., chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics's Committee on Nutrition. A possible exception: If your child's gaining weight too quickly for his height, your pediatrician may recommend switching to low-fat milk before age 2.
Otherwise, switch to 1- or 2-percent milk at age 2 to move your child closer to a diet with moderate amounts of fat and cholesterol. As long as he doesn't have a weight problem, he can drink 1 or 2 percent indefinitely, rather than switching to skim. Kids need the fat for nerve development for many years.

Milk is good for my child's bones, right?
Despite common wisdom, recent research looking at the long-term bone-building effects of dairy products has produced mixed results. "But we do know that three factors determine strong bones: genetics, physical activity, and calcium," says Dr. Greer. "And milk is the number one source of calcium." Milk is also fortified with vitamin D, another important player in bone health, and it has other vital nutrients, including protein, phosphorous, vitamin A, and some B vitamins. Bottom line: Milk is good for bones, but other factors matter, too.

How much is enough?
Recent U.S. dietary guidelines have raised the number of recommended servings of dairy products from two to three a day for kids between 4 and 8. It's still two servings a day for kids under 4. (For kids 9 to 18, it's four servings.) One cup of milk or yogurt or 1.5 ounces of cheese (equivalent to six dice-size cubes) counts as a serving.
But keep in mind that all dairy products are not created equal. Yogurt, for instance, has more protein and sometimes has more calcium than milk, but it's rarely fortified with vitamin D.

Can milk keep my child thin?
The jury is still out on this, particularly for kids. Some studies have shown that the more dairy foods they consume, the less body fat they put on over time. Yet a recent Harvard study found that young children who drank more than three servings of milk a day gained more weight over a period of one year  -- whether they drank whole or low-fat milk. Helaine Rockett, one of the study authors, thinks it's wise to keep milk drinking in perspective. "Milk is healthy, but it does have calories. If your child is overweight, switch him to water once he meets his servings of dairy for the day."

So you can have too much of a good thing?
Yup. In addition to the extra calories, too much milk can fill kids up, increasing the likelihood that they forgo other nutrient-rich foods. So limit your child to the recommended servings per day and make sure he gets a wide variety of nutritious foods.

What if my child just doesn't like it?
There aren't many foods that offer the same package of nutrients, but there are other sources of calcium. Besides other dairy foods, fortified OJ, fortified tofu, white beans, and broccoli, some cereals and cereal bars are fortified with it. Before you give up on milk, though, try offering the flavored kind. The extra sugar is a worthy trade-off for milk's nutrients.

http://www.parenting.com/article/got-milk

Quoting jackiewal10:

Um no... after the age of one, even a baby needs water to keep hydrated.  If they are still nursing, that will also hydrate.  Milk doesn't hydrate, so regardless, water is needed. Yes, milk has some nutrition in it, but nothing that can't be gained from foods for a short time while water is given (until milk could be purchased).  What about all those babies who never get milk or dairy in their diets.  They eat and drink other things and get the same amount of nutrition.

Quoting abra:

There is no reason to offer water unless the baby is overweight or they are going to bed with a sippy. Why waste an opportunity to offer nutrition? 

Quoting jackiewal10:

Not at 16 months old.  Water after 6 months is fine is small amounts and fine after 12 months in any amount.

Quoting abra:

It should be fine. I use both. I would avoid water, though. Babies can get water poisioning very easily since their systems are so tiny. 






abra
by Abra on Apr. 8, 2013 at 11:45 PM

Oh sorry about the link, I was busy talking to a friend when I posted it, here it is: http://www.parenting.com/article/got-milk

I guess it's a good think I don't care what strangers on the internet think of me. I could find more legit sources but I don't think truth matters much to people who think they are the reining authority on everything. Just trying to offer alternative perspectives for the OP. 

Cheers!

Quoting jackiewal10:

Yep!  Done with you.  AGAIN.  Your response to me isn't even relevant.  I wasn't arguing about milk in general.  (Reading comprehension is not your friend.)  OP said that she was out of milk.  Not that she was never going to give it.  Water IS an acceptable alternative for the short term.  While formula probably wouldn't hurt (as long as it isn't expired), it also doesn't have the proper nutrients for an infant over the age of 12 months.  That's why you stop feeding it after the age of 12 months.  Giving me the benefits of milk....not conducive to your "argument".  Stop always twisting "facts" trying to make is seem like you know what you're talking about.  It doesn't make you look smart.  Especially when that source that you did provide (I notice there is no link) sounds a little dated.

Quoting abra:

Fluid to stay hydrated, not necessarily water. Most liquids (alcoholic ones excepted) are hydrants. Babies who can't drink dairy must take special care to get the nutrients they would have gotten from milk from other sources. 


Got Milk? The Benefits of Milk for Kids

Get the fact on why your children should drink milk, how much, and what kind. Plus, learn about how DHA-rich foods for kids.

By Daryn Eller

When we were growing up, the case for milk was clear: It was good for you, your parents told you to drink it (which you did or, defiantly, didn't), end of story. Since then, researchers have been taking a closer look at the benefits of dairy products, and this has confused the issue of how much kids need, when they need it, and what kind they should get. The facts:

When do infants need milk?
Cow's milk isn't digested well by babies under 12 months, and it lacks essential nutrients supplied by breast milk and formula. So hold off on introducing it until your baby's at least a year old. (The cow's milk in cow's milk-based formula is safe for babies.)

Then what? Whole or low-fat?
Until your child is 2, whole milk. "He needs the fat for nerve and brain development," says Frank Greer, M.D., chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics's Committee on Nutrition. A possible exception: If your child's gaining weight too quickly for his height, your pediatrician may recommend switching to low-fat milk before age 2.
Otherwise, switch to 1- or 2-percent milk at age 2 to move your child closer to a diet with moderate amounts of fat and cholesterol. As long as he doesn't have a weight problem, he can drink 1 or 2 percent indefinitely, rather than switching to skim. Kids need the fat for nerve development for many years.

Milk is good for my child's bones, right?
Despite common wisdom, recent research looking at the long-term bone-building effects of dairy products has produced mixed results. "But we do know that three factors determine strong bones: genetics, physical activity, and calcium," says Dr. Greer. "And milk is the number one source of calcium." Milk is also fortified with vitamin D, another important player in bone health, and it has other vital nutrients, including protein, phosphorous, vitamin A, and some B vitamins. Bottom line: Milk is good for bones, but other factors matter, too.

How much is enough?
Recent U.S. dietary guidelines have raised the number of recommended servings of dairy products from two to three a day for kids between 4 and 8. It's still two servings a day for kids under 4. (For kids 9 to 18, it's four servings.) One cup of milk or yogurt or 1.5 ounces of cheese (equivalent to six dice-size cubes) counts as a serving.
But keep in mind that all dairy products are not created equal. Yogurt, for instance, has more protein and sometimes has more calcium than milk, but it's rarely fortified with vitamin D.

Can milk keep my child thin?
The jury is still out on this, particularly for kids. Some studies have shown that the more dairy foods they consume, the less body fat they put on over time. Yet a recent Harvard study found that young children who drank more than three servings of milk a day gained more weight over a period of one year  -- whether they drank whole or low-fat milk. Helaine Rockett, one of the study authors, thinks it's wise to keep milk drinking in perspective. "Milk is healthy, but it does have calories. If your child is overweight, switch him to water once he meets his servings of dairy for the day."

So you can have too much of a good thing?
Yup. In addition to the extra calories, too much milk can fill kids up, increasing the likelihood that they forgo other nutrient-rich foods. So limit your child to the recommended servings per day and make sure he gets a wide variety of nutritious foods.

What if my child just doesn't like it?
There aren't many foods that offer the same package of nutrients, but there are other sources of calcium. Besides other dairy foods, fortified OJ, fortified tofu, white beans, and broccoli, some cereals and cereal bars are fortified with it. Before you give up on milk, though, try offering the flavored kind. The extra sugar is a worthy trade-off for milk's nutrients.

http://www.parenting.com/article/got-milk

Quoting jackiewal10:

Um no... after the age of one, even a baby needs water to keep hydrated.  If they are still nursing, that will also hydrate.  Milk doesn't hydrate, so regardless, water is needed. Yes, milk has some nutrition in it, but nothing that can't be gained from foods for a short time while water is given (until milk could be purchased).  What about all those babies who never get milk or dairy in their diets.  They eat and drink other things and get the same amount of nutrition.

Quoting abra:

There is no reason to offer water unless the baby is overweight or they are going to bed with a sippy. Why waste an opportunity to offer nutrition? 

Quoting jackiewal10:

Not at 16 months old.  Water after 6 months is fine is small amounts and fine after 12 months in any amount.

Quoting abra:

It should be fine. I use both. I would avoid water, though. Babies can get water poisioning very easily since their systems are so tiny. 







"Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children the dragons can be killed." - GK Chesterton 

emilyelephant
by on Apr. 8, 2013 at 11:54 PM
2 moms liked this

Agree. He may not even want it because of the taste.


Quoting jackiewal10:

I don't think it would HURT him...  But why not just give water until you can get milk?  He doesn't NEED milk everyday.  A day or two of not having milk isn't going to be a big deal.  After not having formula for so long, he probably won't like it.  Milk is a lot sweeter.  Formula tastes....bad.  (If it tastes anything like it smells.)



Randi02
by Platinum Member on Apr. 9, 2013 at 1:07 AM
2 moms liked this
I wouldn't bother. Milk isn't necessary, I would just offer water.

I have never given formula, and my kids have never had a drop of cows milk to drink. They get water after they wean.
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