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I have always been fascinated with other cultures esp when it come to birth and babies. I love to find out different ways babies are brought into this world and celebrated. I think its pretty interesting. Like in Ghana they bury the placenta and in Indonesia the mother is massaged daily for the first 90 days. In some cultures the mother must jump over the baby a certain amount of times and then relatives scream at the baby and shake it on a tray. Still other cultures seclude the mother and baby for 30 or 40 days and then the baby comes out and is introduced to the family. Another culture immediately puts a piece of jewelry on the baby that has a red stone in it to ward off evil spirits. 

Does your family have any birth customs or traditions? Did you follow those customs and traditions? What do you think of them? 

by on Aug. 30, 2013 at 7:24 PM
Replies (11-20):
lostosbourne
by on Sep. 1, 2013 at 10:19 AM

BULGARIA AND LITHUANIA HAVE UP TO TWO YEARS PAID MATERNITY LEAVE

Bulgaria pays 100 percent maternity leave for the first year and the minimum salary for the second. 

Lithuania pays one year at 100 percent, or two years at 70 percent for the first 52 weeks, then 40 percent for the rest. Either the mother or father can take it, or they can do the leave in shifts.
lostosbourne
by on Sep. 1, 2013 at 10:21 AM

JAPANESE KEEP THE UMBILICAL CORD IN A BOX

When the baby's umbilical cord falls off, it is saved in a wooden box, called a heso. This is symbol of the mother and child's relationship for the past, present and future. 

On the baby's 7th day (oshichiya), he or she is named.
lostosbourne
by on Sep. 1, 2013 at 10:23 AM

HMONG LOSE THEIR IDENTITY

The ethnic minority group Hmong, who live amongst the Vietnamese, Laotians and Cambodians, lose their first name when they marry. But after the birth of her first child, if the baby is named Tou, for example, the mother becomes "Tou Nam", meaning "Tou's mother". 

By the time she is a grandmother, very few people will actually know her original name.
MIA0223
by Member on Sep. 1, 2013 at 10:24 AM
2 moms liked this
The dad whispers the call to prayer in the baby's right ear as soon as they are born.
And they get a bit of date in their mouth as the first taste before they nurse.
Those are religious and cultural customs.
And my personal tradition is I catch my babies. I literally bring my kids into the world. I pull them out and bring them to my chest and I am the first person to lay hands on them in their life!
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lostosbourne
by on Sep. 1, 2013 at 10:25 AM

BALINESE BABIES' FEET CAN'T TOUCH THE GROUND

A custom of many of the Balinese after birth is that the baby's feet must not touch the ground for the first 105 days. Instead, they are held continuously by their mothers and other close family members.
lostosbourne
by on Sep. 1, 2013 at 10:26 AM

TIBETANS DECORATE THEIR HOUSE

Two large banners are put up outside on the roof eaves. One is to ward off evil and protect the child, the other to attract good fortune. However, the actual celebration does not commence until the third day of the child's life, or fourth for a girl child. Many people may journey from other places to do this. 

Gifts of clothing, yak-buttered tea, barley wine, meat and cheese are presented to represent wishes for an abundant life. 
Jessicamarquez
by Member on Sep. 1, 2013 at 10:27 AM
1 mom liked this
We have to put red to ward off evil immediately at first I had the Dr put on a red ribbon we then changed it to a bracelet with a charm that looks like a fist all red :D
lostosbourne
by on Sep. 1, 2013 at 10:28 AM

IN PAKISTAN THE MOTHER-TO-BE MOVES OUT

In Pakistan a few days before the birth of the baby, she the mother moves out of the home and into a building called the Bashleni. It is painted with animals and contains a shrine to Dezalik, the goddess of birth.

Only 'unclean' women (women who have their period) may enter the building to help out, and they must be naked - even the mid-wife. 
lostosbourne
by on Sep. 1, 2013 at 10:30 AM

INDIAN WOMEN TAKE A CLEANSING BATH OF COW'S MILK AND URINE

Like Chinese women, Indian women do not wash straight away. However on the fifth day after the birth, she is given a bath in cow's urine and milk. 

Then she rests in a room prepared with fresh cow dung.
kcangel63
by Bronze Member on Sep. 1, 2013 at 10:33 AM
Not a custom. Just the way I do it. We birth unassisted, then I encapsulate the placenta.
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