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Babies Babies

I have always been fascinated with other cultures esp when it come to birth and babies. I love to find out different ways babies are brought into this world and celebrated. I think its pretty interesting. Like in Ghana they bury the placenta and in Indonesia the mother is massaged daily for the first 90 days. In some cultures the mother must jump over the baby a certain amount of times and then relatives scream at the baby and shake it on a tray. Still other cultures seclude the mother and baby for 30 or 40 days and then the baby comes out and is introduced to the family. Another culture immediately puts a piece of jewelry on the baby that has a red stone in it to ward off evil spirits. 

Does your family have any birth customs or traditions? Did you follow those customs and traditions? What do you think of them? 

by on Aug. 30, 2013 at 7:24 PM
Replies (31-40):
Bonneata
by Bronze Member on Sep. 1, 2013 at 8:18 PM

Do you know anymore about the irth traditions of Ghana like why they bury the placenta? Just curious I want to learn all I can about my heritage. 

lostosbourne
by on Sep. 2, 2013 at 9:26 AM
1 mom liked this

Yes, they treat the placenta as if it were the dead twin of the baby. They swaddle it in a blanket and give it full burial rights and usually bury it under a tree (they feel the tree is the symbol of life) altho some parts place it in an uncultivated field and cover it with grains and grass. Still others bury it int he dirt floor of the family's house. 

Quoting Bonneata:


Do you know anymore about the irth traditions of Ghana like why they bury the placenta? Just curious I want to learn all I can about my heritage. 


lostosbourne
by on Sep. 2, 2013 at 9:31 AM

In Jamaica an open Bible is often placed in a newborn's crib or bed, to protect the baby and ward off evil. The Bible is usually left open at a Psalm.

A red string may be tied around a newborn's wrist, or in the hair. This is to 'run duppy' (chase ghosts away) and ward off evil.

Many parents will not cut an infant's hair before the child has started to speak. It is believed that cutting the hair will delay the start of speech.

The fingernails of an infant should not be cut with scissors as this might make the child grow up to be a thief. A pin may be used, as the fingernails at that stage are very soft.

New mothers are encouraged to stay indoors for a few days so as not to catch a 'baby cold'. It used to be customary for both mother and newborn to be isolated for eight days after birth.

An expectant mother is believed to 'mark' her child with the things she craves during pregnancy. So if the mother craves mangoes, the baby is likely to be born with a birthmark resembling a mango.

A pumpkin vine will bear abundantly if a pregnant woman steps over it.

If a lizard jumps on a woman, it means she is pregnant or will soon become pregnant.

jessymoka
by Member on Sep. 2, 2013 at 9:36 AM
1 mom liked this
This was a great and interesting post, thanks.
lostosbourne
by on Sep. 2, 2013 at 9:47 AM

In Italian culture, there are some families who attribute a saint to a child's name. The saint's name is so attached to the child that for the first few birthdays, families celebrate both the baby's birthday and the saint's day. Saint days are sanctioned by the Catholic Church, so when the saint's day comes up, the family celebrates as if it is the child's actual birthday as well.

lostosbourne
by on Sep. 2, 2013 at 10:03 AM

In some Native American cultures once the child was born the umbilical cord was cut and tied off. It took about a week or so before that little piece fell off of the belly and that piece was kept to put into the umbilical cord pouch. It was kept for good luck and good health, like a good luck charm for that child. It belonged only to that child. When that person passed away, it was buried right along with them. It was something that was a tie between the mother and the family and the tribe as a whole.

Babies are also placed into a special cradle board where he or she is kept most of the time. Its where the tradition of swaddling comes from. The first 3 months after a child's birth is consider the 4th "trimester" because babies are just getting used to being outside of the womb so swaddling them makes them feel safe nad secure. 

lostosbourne
by on Sep. 2, 2013 at 10:04 AM

You're welcome.

Quoting jessymoka:

This was a great and interesting post, thanks.

wedding countdown

Audi AKA The Lost Osbourne

MrsSippyCup
by on Sep. 2, 2013 at 11:24 AM
1 mom liked this
My husband is Moroccan and we are Muslim after 40 days we shaved his head. We are sending the hair back to Morocco and its weight is donated in gold to the poor. We also slaughter a lamb (2 for a boy). We eat it and share with the poor.
Also my sil made me dinner for the day I came out of the hospital, a certain dish that all post partum moms eat.

Dh wanted the Quran in his bassinet but I said no it made me nervous!
MrsSippyCup
by on Sep. 2, 2013 at 11:30 AM
1 mom liked this
This too I forgot lol
DH recited the Muslim call to prayer in ds ear a as soon he was moved out the or.
We didn't give him some date though.


Quoting MIA0223:

The dad whispers the call to prayer in the baby's right ear as soon as they are born.

And they get a bit of date in their mouth as the first taste before they nurse.

Those are religious and cultural customs.

And my personal tradition is I catch my babies. I literally bring my kids into the world. I pull them out and bring them to my chest and I am the first person to lay hands on them in their life!
Bonneata
by Bronze Member on Sep. 2, 2013 at 4:00 PM


Thanks! Did you cross anything involving a nameing ceremony or send me the write direction? 

Quoting lostosbourne:

Yes, they treat the placenta as if it were the dead twin of the baby. They swaddle it in a blanket and give it full burial rights and usually bury it under a tree (they feel the tree is the symbol of life) altho some parts place it in an uncultivated field and cover it with grains and grass. Still others bury it int he dirt floor of the family's house. 

Quoting Bonneata:


Do you know anymore about the irth traditions of Ghana like why they bury the placenta? Just curious I want to learn all I can about my heritage. 




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