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Can you recommend a midwife in North Jersey?

Posted by on Nov. 16, 2009 at 2:36 PM
  • 1 Replies

Hi all, I actually have an OB and plan to deliver at the hospital near me. But lately ive been getting worried about my OB and hospital not following what I want during my birth. I will have a talk with my ob but I certainly want to do things more natural and if he has a problem with that, then I want to be prepared to switch to a midwife.

I do want to give birth at a hospital because this is my first birth and scared to do it at home. I know some midwifes do deliver at hospitals. Can you recommend one? Is she covered thru insurance? Money is another concern for me. Although maybe if i just hire one for delivery it wont cost that much?? Since ive had all my prenatal care with OB already.

Thank you so much ladies.

  


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by on Nov. 16, 2009 at 2:36 PM
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doulala
by on Nov. 16, 2009 at 3:16 PM

I prefer and support midwifery care for healthy, low-risk moms-to-be.    For better care, health, and safety, a midwife can help you to have a better experience.

Quoting 1stimemami:

Hi all, I actually have an OB and plan to deliver at the hospital near me. But lately ive been getting worried about my OB and hospital not following what I want during my birth.

Well, it is always YOUR call.   You decide.   But it can be very hard, I know!  You might also try a birth plan and a birth doula.

I will have a talk with my ob but I certainly want to do things more natural and if he has a problem with that, then I want to be prepared to switch to a midwife.

It's important to have a very open & honest dialogue with your provider so there are no problems later...

I do want to give birth at a hospital because this is my first birth and scared to do it at home. I know some midwifes do deliver at hospitals. Can you recommend one?

95% of midwives are nurse-midwives ("CNMs") who work in/with hospitals.   Many work as partners with OBs in their practices.

Is she covered thru insurance? Money is another concern for me. Although maybe if i just hire one for delivery it wont cost that much?? Since ive had all my prenatal care with OB already.

Most are covered, sure.  You'll have to check with your coverage plan to see.

Thank you so much ladies.

Here is some info~    hope this helps.   ;-)



HOW TO FIND A MIDWIFE 
http://www.midwife.org/find.cfm
http://cfmidwifery.org/find/index.aspx
http://birthpartners.com/
http://www.mana.org/memberlist.html 

Questions to Ask a Midwife

Experience

  1. What is your general philosophy about pregnancy and birth?
  2. Do you let us do whatever we want during labor? (Food, positions, water, etc.)
  3. What is your education and training as a midwife?
  4. How many years have you been practicing?
  5. Are you a mother yourself? How old are your children now?
  6. How were your babies born?
  7. Do you work alone or with a partner or assistant? If you work with someone, what is their experience?
  8. Do you participate in a local midwife peer review group?  How many meetings have you attended in the past year?
  9. How many births have you attended as the primary caregiver?
  10. What is your experience with breech births? How many have you attended?
  11. What is your experience with twins? How many have you attended?
  12. What is your experience with VBACS? How many have you attended?

Prenatal Care

  1. How many births are you attending now? Do you have a maximum, and how do you manage to avoid too many commitments?
  2. If I am planning a home birth, do you come to my home any time before I go into labor? Do you provide supplies or literature to help us prepare?
  3. How often will I see you? What do your checkups consist of?
  4. What are your guidelines concerning weight gain, nutrition, prenatal vitamins, and exercise? What are your standards for pre-eclampsia?
  5. Do you require that I take a childbirth education class? Do you teach such a class?
  6. Who takes over for you if you go on vacation or get sick?

Hospital and Obstetrician

  1. Do you attend births in a birthing center, home or hospital?
  2. How do you handle emergencies? Under what circumstances would you transfer?
  3. What is your transfer rate?
  4. Would you stay with me in the hospital?
  5. Do you require that I see a physician during my pregnancy even if everything is all right?
  6. Do you have guidelines or restrictions about who can give birth at home?
  7. Under what circumstances do you induce labor with pitocin?
  8. What is your protocol to induce labor naturally?
  9. What is your c-section rate?
  10. What is your episitomy rate?

General Labor

  1. What kind of equipment do you bring to a birth?
  2. Are you permitted to administer any drugs during labor?
  3. How many people are allowed to be around?
  4. When should I call you after my labor begins?
  5. Do you wait until the cord has stopped pulsating before it gets cut?
  6. Will you allow my partner to be as active at the birth as he desires?
  7. How much time do you allow for the delivery of the placenta?

Financial Matters

  1. What are your fees and what do they include?
  2. Can you submit your charges to my insurance company?
  3. What payment arrangements do you make?

The Baby

  1. Have you ever had to resuscitate a baby?
  2. Do you examine the baby after birth?
  3. Do you give eyedrops or shots to the baby?
  4. Do you have a pediatrician you work with or recommend?
  5. Will you help me with breastfeeding?
  6. How do you feel about circumcision?
  7. How often do you come to see me after I give birth?
  8. Do you provide or know of anyone who will help new mothers after birth?

 




(midwives)  Woman's Way    and    Obstetric Way

 


 

Women's Way of BirthObstetric Way of Birth
Cultural definition of birth
  • Social event
  • Normal part of women's lives
  • Birth is work by the woman and her family and kin
  • The woman is a person passing through a major life transition
  • Potentially pathological process
  • Illness
  • Birth is work of doctors/nurses/midwives and other experts
  • The woman is a patient
The setting for birth
  • Home or other familiar surroundings
  • Informal system of care
  • In a woman's home or near
  • With other women of neighbourhood and family
  • Continuity of care
  • Woman free to change position and move about
  • Hospital, territory alien to the woman
  • Bureaucratic, hierarchical system of care
  • May be distant from woman's home
  • Woman is separated from those close to her
  • Discontinuity of care, e.g. shift changes/woman is moved from one room or one ward to another
  • Woman may not be free to change position and move about
Caregivers: the support they give and the conduct of labour
  • Older and more experienced women who are themselves mothers
  • See birth as holistic process
  • Shared decision-making between caregivers and woman giving birth
  • No class distinction between caregivers and woman giving birth
  • Equal relationship
  • Information shared
  • Personal caring - longer, more frequent, and in-depth prenatal visits
  • Often strong emotional support
  • Verbal and non-verbal encouragement
  • Familiar language and imagery used
  • Empathy
  • Cultural awareness because they are part of the same culture
  • Awareness of spiritual significance of birth
  • Believes in integrity of birth, uses technology if appropriate and proven
  • Young and older women who have often not themselves had babies, under direction of male obstetricians
  • Trained to focus on medical aspects of birth
  • Professional care that is authoritarian
  • Often class distinction between obstetricians and patients
  • Dominant-subordinate relationship
  • Information about health, disease, and degree of risk kept secret
  • Care depersonalized
  • Little emotional support
  • Lack of communication
  • Use of medical language
  • Threatening and often punitive behaviour, e.g. commanding, scolding, warning
  • Little cultural awareness of rituals, beliefs, social behaviour, values
  • Spiritual aspects of birth ignored or treated as embarrassing
  • Values technology, often without proof that it improves birth outcomes
Techniques used
  • Skills to preserve the physiological progress of labour
  • Usually intervention-free
  • Comfort skill, e.g. massage, hot and cold compresses, holding
  • Few resources to handle complicated obstructed labour
  • No skills to preserve the physiological progress of labour
  • Obstetric intervention
  • Drugs for pain relief
  • Skills and resources to handle complicated and obstructed labour, e.g. intravenous fluids, oxytocin stimulation, surgery

 

http://www.moondragon.org/articles/comparison.html




If you don't know your options, you don't have any.           ~Korte & Scaer

Mothers need to know that their care and their choices won't be compromised by birth politics.                                                                                            ~Jennifer Rosenberg

Midwives
see birth as a miracle and only mess with it if there's a problem;
doctors see birth as a problem and if they don't mess with it, it's a
miracle!     
~Barbara Harper

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