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trying avoid another 15 minute epidural. need help relaxing.

Posted by on Nov. 20, 2009 at 11:42 PM
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Well labor with my son went great until the end. Idk if it was the pitocin or what but incase it wasn't I need ways to relax my body. I got so tense from the pain that my son couldn't come down that little bit to make me 10 cm. I was at 9 and he stopped and his heart rate went down so I had the choice epidural or c section. I of course chose epidural and litterly 15 minutes later I started pushing and 19 minutes pf pushing and he was born. I really did want a epi so incase I can't have my water birth or the tub doesn't relax me what can I do to relax me enough so I don't have another epi.the birthing ball didn't help at all so that's not a option. What can I try to physically relax me?
by on Nov. 20, 2009 at 11:42 PM
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doulala
by on Nov. 20, 2009 at 11:49 PM

There are options!  :-)

How about Bradley or HypnoBirthing or HypnoBabies?
Or learning about the normal-natural course of physiological birth works.    You can discover how normal it is to "rest" (AKA "stall") at the end of dilating.   You can learn how to move and work with your body to keep it progressing and relaxed.   Having a good support person can really make a huge difference.   The location a mom chooses to deliver in has an impact, for sure.


I can pass on other some relaxation suggestions, too.



Birth is not only about making babies. Birth is about making mothers ~ strong, competent, capable mothers who trust themselves and know their inner strength.

~Barbara Katz Rothma


When you change the way you view birth, the way you birth will change. -Mongan


housefullofkidz
by on Nov. 20, 2009 at 11:53 PM

I've tried visualisation but that is about it. Good luck mama!

 There are two ways to live your life - one is as though nothing is a miracle, the other is as though everything is a miracle. Albert Einstein andee.jpg picture by us5dots   Join us in the Pregnancy Group,Housefullofkidz, Pregnancy Group Mod 

Pandana
by on Nov. 21, 2009 at 12:30 AM


Quoting doulala:

There are options!  :-)

How about Bradley or HypnoBirthing or HypnoBabies?
Or learning about the normal-natural course of physiological birth works.    You can discover how normal it is to "rest" (AKA "stall") at the end of dilating.   You can learn how to move and work with your body to keep it progressing and relaxed.   Having a good support person can really make a huge difference.   The location a mom chooses to deliver in has an impact, for sure.


I can pass on other some relaxation suggestions, too.

All of this.

"Stalling" (progressing consistently for a time, and then seeing a lull in progress) is very normal in some labors, but it's usually not treated as such in our current care system. It's treated as an obstacle that must be actively (even sometimes aggressively) overcome. The body is often USING that time, and there are things that can be done to facilitate that, rather than trying to force it back onto the clock, as is pretty standard practice.

Fear and reluctance are usually at the root of stress that interferes with labor progress, so as Doulala said, having good support can be essential. Epidurals can sometimes help, but it's just as likely due to the psychological effect....in other words: it feels proactive, therefore it is calming, and the calming effect is what "works". Anesthesia won't facilitate labor unless it has that psychological effect on a woman, enabling her to calm down, release her hold, and let her body go. That being said, the same thing can be achieved without the use of anesthesia OR pitocin (the two often go hand in hand, regardless of which comes first) if good preparation and labor support help her to release her anxiety about the pain.

Personally, learning about the natural physiological process (again, as Doulala says) was most helpful. Simply understanding the underlying purpose of the pain and trusting my instincts to guide me through alleviated any stress. Without the burden of stress, I could just let it happen. I think that the method of care I received and the location DID have a huge impact for me, as well. But Ive always been a huge believer in the idea that "knowledge is power", and it's always worked for me LOL. So on a PERSONAL level, taht's the best advice I can offer. There are various more structured methods for coping with pain however, and so I'd totally encourgae you to explore any and all of them.

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