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GBS - piog

Posted by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 12:14 PM
  • 10 Replies

Well lovely... I just got a phone call (that I wish was a joke lol) saying my test came back positive. So another one of us that has it here... Not worried. Basically just means that I will have the chlorhedexine flush every 6 hours during labour and should up my vitamin c from now until then, which I needed to do anyway because my urine tests for the last 2 weeks have shown I'm fighing off this bug my daughter/husband got and we don't want me sick when I have the baby lol. I know there's a few other things I can do to help before (probiotics and stuff) but I don't have the list off the top of my head & it was the midwife I don't see (don't care for) that called to give me the news & she didn't say beyond the vit c. I know I typed it somewhere on here though so later I get to go on a hunt lol.

On top of that she made a comment about my hemoglobin (sp?) levels being low, which confused the living daylights out of me because the SAME lady called me last week to say that they were coming up along w/ my iron. After I brought that up she looked it up and said I was right, it was just a little low... which is still a big improvement over what they were.  Keep up with supplements like I was planning, but scared me for a second. :-P

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by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 12:14 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Megara
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 12:29 PM
Vitamin C and probiotics are my suggestion. There is also the garlic treatment that doulala has a link to, I'm sure she'll post it. I had GBS with my first baby and didn't end up doing anything during labor because my water didn't break until several hours in.
MamaKalila
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 12:39 PM

Thanks! Yeah she mentioned the Vit C & I remembered garlic & probiotics.. There were a few others my midwife mentioned, but this one didn't. I'm prob just gonna go w/ those three anyway, but I wanted to at least see what the others were again.  My water didn't break until a good ways in w/ my first either so maybe I'll get lucky like you lol.  I'm not worried about the flush thing though, the one thing that I was nervous about was if I'd still get to have a water birth with it and she said yes I could...

K.a.C.87
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 12:44 PM

happy everything is well.....i bet u cant wait till d-day...u are SOOOO close :)

MamaKalila
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 12:53 PM

Thanks :-) I actually don't feel ready lol. I've gone this whole pg saying I'd like to go to 42 weeks (not likely but I can hope right?) and for the last month or so we're just getting the feeling like he may be earlier... and now my husband keeps going on about how its gonna be this week. I know its just cause he's anxious to meet his son, but still.. uggh. lol. I am too but we have so much to do & I really want him to stay in as long as he needs too.

Quoting K.a.C.87:

happy everything is well.....i bet u cant wait till d-day...u are SOOOO close :)


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doulala
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 2:09 PM


Quoting Megara:

Vitamin C and probiotics are my suggestion. There is also the garlic treatment that doulala has a link to, I'm sure she'll post it. I had GBS with my first baby and didn't end up doing anything during labor because my water didn't break until several hours in.

I do love to save info for the wonderful ladies on here--   just want to be helpful!!!   ;-D

lol





How to Treat a Vaginal Infection with a Clove of Garlic

by Judy Slome Cohain, CNM

[Editor's Note: This article first appeared in The Birthkit Issue 38, Summer 2003 and was updated by the author in April 2007.]
Photo by Jennifer Rosenberg

Photo by Jennifer RosenbergGarlic kills yeast. Those who bake bread know not to add garlic while the dough is rising or it will kill the yeast. Instead, garlic is added to the dough after it has risen, just before baking it in the oven.

A fresh garlic clove can easily cure a yeast infection. The trick is to catch the infection early. A woman who suffers from frequent yeast infections knows the feeling well. The first day, she feels just a tickle of itchiness that comes and goes. The next day, or sometimes two or three days later, the vaginal discharge starts to look white and lumpy like tiny bits of cottage cheese. By this time, she has a full-blown yeast infection and the lips of the vagina are often red and sore.

If a woman can pay attention to the first tickling of the yeast infection, she can use the following treatment. Take a clove of fresh garlic and peel off the natural white paper shell that covers it, leaving the clove intact. At bedtime, put the clove into the vagina. In the morning, remove the garlic clove and throw it in the toilet. The garlic often causes the vagina to have a watery discharge. One night's treatment may be enough to kill the infection, or it might have to be repeated the next night. Continue one or two days until all itchiness is gone. The reason that the treatment is done at bedtime is that there is a connection between the mouth and the vagina. The moment the garlic is placed in the vagina, the taste of the garlic travels up to the mouth. Most people will find this strong flavor annoying during the day, so the treatment is recommended for nighttime.

If the infection has advanced to the point that a woman has large quantities of white discharge and red sore labia, it can still be treated by garlic but with a higher dose. Use a dry tissue to remove some of the discharge, then take a clove of garlic and cut it in half. Put it in the vagina at bedtime and repeat this for a few nights. If there is no improvement, she might consider a conventional over-the-counter treatment because it is a shame to suffer for many days. Remember that a woman should never douche during a vaginal infection. Yeast loves water and any water will make it grow faster.

Any cut in the clove makes the activity of the garlic stronger. Thus, the more of the inside of the clove that is exposed, the higher the dose. Each woman should learn the dose that works best for her, from the lowest dose, an uncut clove, to a clove with one or more small fingernail slits, to a clove cut in half.

If a high dose of garlic, a cut-open garlic clove, is inserted in a healthy vagina, it will often "burn" the healthy skin. When the woman is suffering from an advanced yeast infection, the skin is already red and "burned" and the garlic cures the infection by killing the yeast. Then the skin repairs itself. By the way, veterinarians have been using garlic to heal infections in livestock for many years. If drug companies could patent garlic and make money off of it, they would be advertising it everywhere!

Garlic has been shown in vitro (in laboratory petri dishes) to kill bacteria also. In some important research done in China (1), garlic was shown to inhibit the growth of all of the following microorganisms: Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium phlei, Streptococcus faecalis, Bacillus cereus and Micrococcus luteus.

Researchers found that garlic lost its antibacterial activities within 20 minutes of being boiled at 100° C. At the Maxwell Finland Laboratory for Infectious Diseases in the Boston Medical Center, researchers examined the use of garlic for ear infections (2). They found that fresh garlic was bacteriocidal, killing even the dangerous bacterium Streptococcus agalactiae (commonly known as Group B Strep) but is heat- and acid-labile and loses activity when cooked or taken by mouth.

Group B Strep (GBS) can kill newborns, most commonly premature babies. Current U.S. protocols call for culturing women toward the end of pregnancy to see if they are GBS carriers, since newborn strep infections occur more often—but not exclusively—in babies of women who culture positive for beta-strep. About 15 to 30 percent of women carry the beta-strep bacterium, the vast majority without any symptoms, although at least two women with GBS vaginitis have been documented (3). The risk of contracting GBS by infants probably increases with the quantity of GBS in the birth canal (4). Between 1–3 in 1,000 babies develop beta-strep infections after birth (5). Many of these infections may be iatrogenic, caused by the hospital protocols. The strep bacillus originates in the anus. When the membranes are ruptured, fluid washes down and out of the vagina—until someone checks the cervix. Every time a cervical check is done, the examiner may carry GBS up on his or her gloved finger and deposit it on the cervix. Inserting an internal electro-fetal monitor electrode or an internal monitoring catheter also opens a pathway for bacteria to enter. Any of these scenarios could also explain why length of time after rupture of membranes correlates with infection rate. No randomized controlled studies have been undertaken comparing women with no vaginal checks or internal monitors to women with frequent vaginal checks. Intrapartum prophylaxis with intravenous antibiotics, preferably targeted on GBS-colonized parturients with risk factors, is, at present, considered the "new standard of care." However, its efficacy and safety at preventing early-onset infection is still in debate. [Editor's Note: See "Facing the Challenge of Group B Strep" in Midwifery Today, Issue 63, Autumn 2002.] Vaginal chlorhexidine disinfection during labour in GBS-colonized women may, in addition, offer a minor contribution to prevention. Chlorhexidine is a compound with plaque-inhibiting effects and available only by prescription in the U.S.* Its side effects include staining of teeth, restorations and the tongue, bitter taste and other disturbances, such as dryness of the mouth and development of oral ulceration (6).

A fresh garlic clove inserted into the vagina for one or two nights will also, most likely, reduce the colonization of the vagina with GBS, with no known side effects, besides garlic breath. But none of the funding agencies or drug companies are interested in providing support for research—likely because the product could not be patented. Chlorhexidine vaginal gel or wash reduces GBS colonization, so the idea of using local measures is not too radical. But at this time, a clinical trial in the U.S. to demonstrate efficacy of these topical methods will be almost impossible, given the established standard of care (intrapartum antibiotics) established by the CDC. So garlic experiments to reduce neonatal GBS will have to take place outside of the U.S.

Garlic protocol:

  • Break a clove off of a bulb of garlic and peel off the paper-like cover. Cut in half. Sew a string thru it for easy retrieval.
  • Put a fresh half in your vagina in the evening before you go to sleep. Most women taste garlic in their mouths as soon as it is in their vagina, so it is less pleasant to treat while awake.
  • In the morning, the garlic may come out when you poop. If not, many women find it is easiest to take it out on the toilet. Circle the vagina with a finger, till you find it. It cannot enter the uterus through the cervix. It cannot get lost, but it can get pushed into the pocket between the cervix and the vaginal wall.
  • Most people will taste the garlic as long as it is in there. So if you still taste it, it is probably still in there. Most women have trouble getting it out the first time.
  • For easy retrieval, sew a string through the middle of the clove before you put it in. You don't want to get irritated. Be gentle. Don't scratch yourself with long nails.

Judy Slome Cohain, CNM, has run All the Way Homebirth practice in Israel since 1983. She would love to hear from women who have tried to change a positive GBS culture to a negative one by using garlic. Please email her at judyslome@hotmail.com with the outcomes, which will be collected for future research.

*A compound of chlorhexidine is the main ingredient in Hibiclens®, an antimicrobial skin cleanser available over the counter.

References

  1. Chen, H.C., Chang, M.D., Chang, T.J. (1985) Antibacterial Properties of Some Spice Plants Before and After Heat Treatment. [English translation of Chinese article]. Zhonghua Min Guo Wei Sheng Wu Ji Mian Yi Xue Za Zhi 18: 190–5.
  2. Klein, J.O. (1999) Management of Acute Otitis Media in an Era of Increasing Antibiotic Resistance. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 49: S15–17.
  3. Honig, E., Mouton J.W., van der Meijden, W.I. (1999) Can Group B Streptococci Cause Symptomatic Vaginitis? Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol 7: 206–09.
  4. Christensen, K.K, Dykes, A.K., Christensen, P. (1985) Reduced Colonization of Newborns with Group B Streptococci Following Washing of the Birth Canal with Chlorhexidine. J Perinat Med 13: 239–43.
  5. Irving, W.L. Best Practice in Labour Ward Management. Edited by L.H. Kean, P.N. Baker and D. Edelstone. London: WB Saunders, 2000.
  6. Albandar, J.M., Gjermo, P., Preus, H.R. (1994) Chlorhexidine Use after Two Decades of Over-the-counter Availability. J Periodontol 65: 109–12.

If you enjoyed this article, you'll enjoy Birthkit newsletter back issues!





Thinking about  Natural Pregnancy and Childbirth  !!!

MamaKalila
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 2:37 PM

Thanks! I know I've seen the info before, but I was hoping you'd repost it :-D  If for no other reason than the directions for how to do the garlic... So glad we picked up some fresh the other day.  One less thing to "worry" about. As is I just walked down to get Vit C & probiotics and just about wore myself out...

Quoting doulala:


Quoting Megara:

Vitamin C and probiotics are my suggestion. There is also the garlic treatment that doulala has a link to, I'm sure she'll post it. I had GBS with my first baby and didn't end up doing anything during labor because my water didn't break until several hours in.

I do love to save info for the wonderful ladies on here--   just want to be helpful!!!   ;-D

lol





How to Treat a Vaginal Infection with a Clove of Garlic

by Judy Slome Cohain, CNM

[Editor's Note: This article first appeared in The Birthkit Issue 38, Summer 2003 and was updated by the author in April 2007.]
Photo by Jennifer Rosenberg

Photo by Jennifer RosenbergGarlic kills yeast. Those who bake bread know not to add garlic while the dough is rising or it will kill the yeast. Instead, garlic is added to the dough after it has risen, just before baking it in the oven.

A fresh garlic clove can easily cure a yeast infection. The trick is to catch the infection early. A woman who suffers from frequent yeast infections knows the feeling well. The first day, she feels just a tickle of itchiness that comes and goes. The next day, or sometimes two or three days later, the vaginal discharge starts to look white and lumpy like tiny bits of cottage cheese. By this time, she has a full-blown yeast infection and the lips of the vagina are often red and sore.

If a woman can pay attention to the first tickling of the yeast infection, she can use the following treatment. Take a clove of fresh garlic and peel off the natural white paper shell that covers it, leaving the clove intact. At bedtime, put the clove into the vagina. In the morning, remove the garlic clove and throw it in the toilet. The garlic often causes the vagina to have a watery discharge. One night's treatment may be enough to kill the infection, or it might have to be repeated the next night. Continue one or two days until all itchiness is gone. The reason that the treatment is done at bedtime is that there is a connection between the mouth and the vagina. The moment the garlic is placed in the vagina, the taste of the garlic travels up to the mouth. Most people will find this strong flavor annoying during the day, so the treatment is recommended for nighttime.

If the infection has advanced to the point that a woman has large quantities of white discharge and red sore labia, it can still be treated by garlic but with a higher dose. Use a dry tissue to remove some of the discharge, then take a clove of garlic and cut it in half. Put it in the vagina at bedtime and repeat this for a few nights. If there is no improvement, she might consider a conventional over-the-counter treatment because it is a shame to suffer for many days. Remember that a woman should never douche during a vaginal infection. Yeast loves water and any water will make it grow faster.

Any cut in the clove makes the activity of the garlic stronger. Thus, the more of the inside of the clove that is exposed, the higher the dose. Each woman should learn the dose that works best for her, from the lowest dose, an uncut clove, to a clove with one or more small fingernail slits, to a clove cut in half.

If a high dose of garlic, a cut-open garlic clove, is inserted in a healthy vagina, it will often "burn" the healthy skin. When the woman is suffering from an advanced yeast infection, the skin is already red and "burned" and the garlic cures the infection by killing the yeast. Then the skin repairs itself. By the way, veterinarians have been using garlic to heal infections in livestock for many years. If drug companies could patent garlic and make money off of it, they would be advertising it everywhere!

Garlic has been shown in vitro (in laboratory petri dishes) to kill bacteria also. In some important research done in China (1), garlic was shown to inhibit the growth of all of the following microorganisms: Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium phlei, Streptococcus faecalis, Bacillus cereus and Micrococcus luteus.

Researchers found that garlic lost its antibacterial activities within 20 minutes of being boiled at 100° C. At the Maxwell Finland Laboratory for Infectious Diseases in the Boston Medical Center, researchers examined the use of garlic for ear infections (2). They found that fresh garlic was bacteriocidal, killing even the dangerous bacterium Streptococcus agalactiae (commonly known as Group B Strep) but is heat- and acid-labile and loses activity when cooked or taken by mouth.

Group B Strep (GBS) can kill newborns, most commonly premature babies. Current U.S. protocols call for culturing women toward the end of pregnancy to see if they are GBS carriers, since newborn strep infections occur more often—but not exclusively—in babies of women who culture positive for beta-strep. About 15 to 30 percent of women carry the beta-strep bacterium, the vast majority without any symptoms, although at least two women with GBS vaginitis have been documented (3). The risk of contracting GBS by infants probably increases with the quantity of GBS in the birth canal (4). Between 1–3 in 1,000 babies develop beta-strep infections after birth (5). Many of these infections may be iatrogenic, caused by the hospital protocols. The strep bacillus originates in the anus. When the membranes are ruptured, fluid washes down and out of the vagina—until someone checks the cervix. Every time a cervical check is done, the examiner may carry GBS up on his or her gloved finger and deposit it on the cervix. Inserting an internal electro-fetal monitor electrode or an internal monitoring catheter also opens a pathway for bacteria to enter. Any of these scenarios could also explain why length of time after rupture of membranes correlates with infection rate. No randomized controlled studies have been undertaken comparing women with no vaginal checks or internal monitors to women with frequent vaginal checks. Intrapartum prophylaxis with intravenous antibiotics, preferably targeted on GBS-colonized parturients with risk factors, is, at present, considered the "new standard of care." However, its efficacy and safety at preventing early-onset infection is still in debate. [Editor's Note: See "Facing the Challenge of Group B Strep" in Midwifery Today, Issue 63, Autumn 2002.] Vaginal chlorhexidine disinfection during labour in GBS-colonized women may, in addition, offer a minor contribution to prevention. Chlorhexidine is a compound with plaque-inhibiting effects and available only by prescription in the U.S.* Its side effects include staining of teeth, restorations and the tongue, bitter taste and other disturbances, such as dryness of the mouth and development of oral ulceration (6).

A fresh garlic clove inserted into the vagina for one or two nights will also, most likely, reduce the colonization of the vagina with GBS, with no known side effects, besides garlic breath. But none of the funding agencies or drug companies are interested in providing support for research—likely because the product could not be patented. Chlorhexidine vaginal gel or wash reduces GBS colonization, so the idea of using local measures is not too radical. But at this time, a clinical trial in the U.S. to demonstrate efficacy of these topical methods will be almost impossible, given the established standard of care (intrapartum antibiotics) established by the CDC. So garlic experiments to reduce neonatal GBS will have to take place outside of the U.S.

Garlic protocol:

  • Break a clove off of a bulb of garlic and peel off the paper-like cover. Cut in half. Sew a string thru it for easy retrieval.
  • Put a fresh half in your vagina in the evening before you go to sleep. Most women taste garlic in their mouths as soon as it is in their vagina, so it is less pleasant to treat while awake.
  • In the morning, the garlic may come out when you poop. If not, many women find it is easiest to take it out on the toilet. Circle the vagina with a finger, till you find it. It cannot enter the uterus through the cervix. It cannot get lost, but it can get pushed into the pocket between the cervix and the vaginal wall.
  • Most people will taste the garlic as long as it is in there. So if you still taste it, it is probably still in there. Most women have trouble getting it out the first time.
  • For easy retrieval, sew a string through the middle of the clove before you put it in. You don't want to get irritated. Be gentle. Don't scratch yourself with long nails.

Judy Slome Cohain, CNM, has run All the Way Homebirth practice in Israel since 1983. She would love to hear from women who have tried to change a positive GBS culture to a negative one by using garlic. Please email her at judyslome@hotmail.com with the outcomes, which will be collected for future research.

*A compound of chlorhexidine is the main ingredient in Hibiclens®, an antimicrobial skin cleanser available over the counter.

References

  1. Chen, H.C., Chang, M.D., Chang, T.J. (1985) Antibacterial Properties of Some Spice Plants Before and After Heat Treatment. [English translation of Chinese article]. Zhonghua Min Guo Wei Sheng Wu Ji Mian Yi Xue Za Zhi 18: 190–5.
  2. Klein, J.O. (1999) Management of Acute Otitis Media in an Era of Increasing Antibiotic Resistance. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 49: S15–17.
  3. Honig, E., Mouton J.W., van der Meijden, W.I. (1999) Can Group B Streptococci Cause Symptomatic Vaginitis? Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol 7: 206–09.
  4. Christensen, K.K, Dykes, A.K., Christensen, P. (1985) Reduced Colonization of Newborns with Group B Streptococci Following Washing of the Birth Canal with Chlorhexidine. J Perinat Med 13: 239–43.
  5. Irving, W.L. Best Practice in Labour Ward Management. Edited by L.H. Kean, P.N. Baker and D. Edelstone. London: WB Saunders, 2000.
  6. Albandar, J.M., Gjermo, P., Preus, H.R. (1994) Chlorhexidine Use after Two Decades of Over-the-counter Availability. J Periodontol 65: 109–12.

If you enjoyed this article, you'll enjoy Birthkit newsletter back issues!






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doulala
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 3:28 PM

lol!

Good luck!!

:-)

MamaKalila
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 3:33 PM

Thanks!

Quoting doulala:

lol!

Good luck!!

:-)


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truealaskanmom
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 6:15 PM

Ok so I am not clear on this, after you do home treatments should you be retested so that they don't try and force IV's or flushes during labor? I also know that GBS can come and go on its own, so should you retest closer to d-day?

MamaKalila
by on Apr. 1, 2010 at 10:13 PM

Retesting was mentioned on the info sheet I signed before the original test, but we haven't talked about it yet... Really I just got the basic info from the lady today (who is not my real midwife and I'm not all that comfortable with honestly) so I'm not sure if we will. I'm guessing if I want to retest (most likely since I'm trying to do something about it now lol) I can. They're pretty (very) good about stuff like that...

Either way no worries about iv's. They'll only do them when necessary... and they don't do the antibiotics at all so if that was needed/wanted I would be transferring to a hospital birth. We did discuss a few weeks ago what would cause that to be needed if I tested positive and basically it was a long unlikely road of things happening (including my water breaking 3 days or so before birth lol). Not expecting all that to happen... and they said at that point they would recommend it, so still no forcing. 

Quoting truealaskanmom:

Ok so I am not clear on this, after you do home treatments should you be retested so that they don't try and force IV's or flushes during labor? I also know that GBS can come and go on its own, so should you retest closer to d-day?


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