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Anyone ever try this?

Posted by on May. 26, 2010 at 2:07 AM
  • 15 Replies

Just curious of how effective it is....anyone know?

Using black and blue cohosh to induce labor has been a tradition for thousands of years.  These two herbs, in combination, are effective in getting labor started when the baby is post term.  They can also be used to increase the strength and effectiveness of weak contractions in a labor that has been progressing slowly.

These herbs should not be used by a pregnant woman, or a woman who suspects she is pregnant until she is at least forty weeks along and has been given the o.k. by her doctor to begin the labor process.  As with any herb it is imperative that you discuss your plans to use black and blue cohosh with your midwife, doctor, or other health care provider.

 

 

What Is Cohosh?

Although they share a common name, black cohosh is a completely different plant from blue cohosh

Black cohosh, or snakeroot, is from the same plant family as the buttercup.  The roots are the part used medicinally.  The roots are gathered, dried, and then they go through various processes to be turned into the form that will be bought by the consumer.  Generally these forms are:

  • Tincture
  • Capsule
  • Tea

Black cohosh is believed to work on the body in the same way as estrogen.  Research is currently underway to either prove or disprove that fact. 

 

>Blue Cohosh, or papoose root, has been used by Native Americans for generations.  It is often wildcrafted.  This means that rather than being grown domestically the herbalist will go out into the wild and collect the root.  Generally blue cohosh is collected in the autumn when it is at its most potent.  Once collected blue cohosh root is dried and then turned into a tincture, capsules, or tea. 

Blue cohosh is an antispasmodic.  It can be used early in pregnancy to stop a miscarriage or premature labor.  It can be used later in pregnancy to stop uncomfortable Braxton Hicks contractions until labor is ready to begin.

So, how does it help with labor?  Simply, blue cohosh coordinates contractions and makes them more effective if they have all ready begun.  When used in combination with black cohosh, this herb can help a labor go more quickly and smoothly.

 

How to Use Black and Blue Cohosh to Induce Labor

Although these herbs are very effective when used properly they will normally not begin labor in a healthy pregnancy if the uterus is not ready.  For this reason it is important to wait until the mother to be is beyond the forty weeks gestation.  By doing this there is certainty that the baby is fully matured and ready to undergo the birth process.

If the mother is all ready in labor, and having weak, uncoordinated, ineffective contractions using a B & B tincture will get things moving.  B & B tincture is generally what this combination of herbs is called.  Tinctures seem to work better than teas or capsules but you should follow the suggestions of your midwife or obstetrician.

Black and blue cohosh to induce labor that hasn't started yet is fine after forty weeks.  Unlike pitocin, B & B tincture work with your body in a natural way.  Contractions strengthen and regulate over time rather than immediately.  Labor moves along at a natural rate and the contractions are not likely to become overwhelming.

Instructions for Use

Following are the usual instructions for using black and blue cohosh for labor.  They should not be considered as medical advice, and it is important that you not try to induce labor without the advice of your health care provider.  Used incorrectly black and blue cohosh can be dangerous to both you and your baby, as can any form of labor induction.

  1. The day before you want to induce labor rest and relax.  Eat a light, healthy diet of lean proteins and vegetables and fruits.  Stay away from sugars and processed foods. 
  2. Get a full night's sleep.
  3. Wake up at about 7 a.m. and drink 20 drops of B & B tincture in warm, not hot, water.
  4. Drink the same mixture, the same way, hourly for the next five hours.  You may have a light lunch if you wish.
  5. Starting about 1:00 p.m., you may resume taking the tincture hourly until 6:00 p.m.
  6. If you are having light contractions you can help them increase by walking, sexual intercourse, orgasm, or nipple stimulation.
  7. If you are not having contractions, stop taking the tincture and try again in three days, using the same method.
  8. It is important that you stay active while you are taking the tincture.  Activity helps contractions to begin and to regulate.

 

>When used for a short period of time there are rarely any side effects to black or blue cohosh.  Herbalists are in one accord that the tincture is safe to take at forty weeks gestation.  You should be aware that every woman has a unique body and therefore a unique response to pregnancy, labor, and herbs.  While conventional medicine pushes for induction at forty weeks some babies are just not ready to be born until forty-one, forty-two, or even forty-three weeks.  Be patient, do as your health care provider suggests, and enjoy the last few days of your pregnancy.  A healthy birth and a healthy baby is the most important thing.
by on May. 26, 2010 at 2:07 AM
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Replies (1-10):
palemoon21
by on May. 26, 2010 at 2:17 AM

I have not used it, however, I prefer herbs above all pharmacuticals. Susun Weed has a great book that has been incredibly helpful to me. Here's her website.

http://www.susunweed.com/

doulala
by on May. 26, 2010 at 2:21 AM
Quoting lashawna_love:

has been given the o.k. by her doctor to begin the labor process.  As with any herb it is imperative that you discuss your plans to use black and blue cohosh with your midwife, doctor, or other health care provider.
 

 

 

I know it to be one of the more risky home remedies because of the blood pressure risk.

I did it under the instruction AND supervision of my midwifery practice. I had a complication that we were weighing risks and felt like attempting induction would be a legit option. Because it is risky, they wanted me in the office to do it so they could constantly monitor my vitals. I was healthy with normal blood pressure, but they knew it was risky. (And it was for nothing... didn't work.)


Blue Cohosh and Black Cohosh can be given to induce labor. 10-20 drops in water every 1-3 hours. Or 20 drops Blue Cohosh every 30 minutes for 2 doses followed by 20 drops of Cotton Root Bark up to every 15 minutes for 3-6 hours. Risks: Blue Cohosh is known to lower blood pressure, cause nausea and may elevate fetal heart tones. Use under guidance of an herbalist or midwife.


Blue and Black Cohosh are general considered to be as unsafe as medical interventions, and if they are to be used must be used only under the recommendation and supervision of your doctor or midwife.   http://www.maternitycorner.com/mcmag/articles/preg0007.html




The knowledge of how to give birth without outside intervention lies deep within each woman. Successful childbirth depends on an acceptance of the process. ~Suzanne Arms


Birth is not an emergency. It is simply an emergence.” - Jeannine Parvati Baker

BaByMaMa27
by on May. 26, 2010 at 4:39 AM

I'm getting some today. [I KNOW I'm not 40 weeks, but doc is intervention happy & REALLY wanting to induce]





palemoon21
by on May. 26, 2010 at 4:46 AM


Quoting BaByMaMa27:

I'm getting some today. [I KNOW I'm not 40 weeks, but doc is intervention happy & REALLY wanting to induce]


It's still an induction......

PLEASE do your research before you decide to use it. Herbs are not always safe. :)

BaByMaMa27
by on May. 26, 2010 at 9:29 AM

BUMP!!!

Pandapanda
by Amber on May. 26, 2010 at 9:31 AM

I know it's one of the riskier "self-induction" methods and I myself wouldn't use it. it can spike your blood pressure, and that could lead to a c-section.

Plus, nothing will work unless your body is going to start labor soon anyways!

lashawna_love
by on May. 27, 2010 at 5:37 AM

Black cohosh, can actually lower your BP, too low. Its actual reccomended use is to help lower cholesterol, and  BP.among other things = )

Quoting Pandapanda:

I know it's one of the riskier "self-induction" methods and I myself wouldn't use it. it can spike your blood pressure, and that could lead to a c-section.

Plus, nothing will work unless your body is going to start labor soon anyways!


BaByMaMa27
by on May. 28, 2010 at 12:12 AM

I took three doses yesterday of black AND blue & NOTHING. lol

lovemynutterbut
by on May. 28, 2010 at 12:23 AM

yeah my doctor told me he would rather me take a couple shots of castor oil than try this herb I just told him I didn't want to be induced tuesday he said go home and take castor oil! Im good on that nasty sh*t I  did it with my first and it didn't work!

ready_for2
by on May. 28, 2010 at 12:35 AM

nooooo this is very dangerous!! these are still drugs, and should be used under the supervision of a professional.

unless you have an herbalist advising and helping you, i wouldnt. and i still wouldnt at that, i think its too risky

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