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Pregnancy Pregnancy

Why Most Moms Don't Follow Breastfeeding Rec's

Posted by on Sep. 21, 2010 at 11:43 AM
  • 41 Replies

http://healthland.time.com/2010/09/17/most-moms-dont-follow-breastfeeding-recommendations/


When it comes to breast-feeding, there's good news and bad news. The former is that lots of U.S. mothers – 75% — are initiating breast-feeding. The latter? Less than a quarter are persevering a full year, which is the minimum the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends babies dine on mom's milk.

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that just 43% of U.S. mothers were still nursing at six months, although the AAP advises babies stick exclusively to breast milk during that period. (This, despite supermodel Gisele Bundchen's much-publicized proposal last month espousing an international law mandating that mothers breastfeed their babies for six months.)

At one year, 22% of women were still breast-feeding.

"We need to direct even more effort toward making sure mothers have the support they need in hospitals, workplaces and communities to continue breast-feeding beyond the first few days of life, so they can make it to those six- and 12-month marks," says William Dietz, director of CDC's Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity.

Reams of research have linked breastfeeding to scores of benefits for both mom and baby: breast-fed babies aren't as likely to fall prey to obesity, ear infections or diabetes; breast-feeding moms benefit from a decreased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Because breast-fed babies are healthier, the AAP projects that a significant increase in the nation's breast-feeding rate could trim nearly $4 billion a year in health care costs.

The data doesn't surprise breast-feeding experts, who attribute the low breast-feeding numbers over time to a lack of support. When breast-feeding proves difficult — it's not as easy as it looks! — “the only option given is formula-feeding rather than breast-feeding support,” says Miriam Labbok, director of the Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “Mothers don't give up. They are undermined or discouraged. They are initiating breast-feeding so they want to breast-feed, but they are not getting the support they need to achieve their intentions.”

Still, the environment is much friendlier toward breast-feeding that it was a few decades ago. Whereas hospitals used to whisk babies away from mothers right after birth, making it difficult to establish a breast-feeding rhythm, many now employ lactation consultants to assist new mothers and encourage rooming-in, where babies sleep in bassinets in the mother's room.

Yet once mom and baby are discharged from the hospital, the story changes. In Europe, many countries send “health visitors” to check on newborn parents at home. And their paid maternity leaves relieve pressure on mothers to return to work before breast-feeding is well-established.

Reform, anyone?



Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2010/09/17/most-moms-dont-follow-breastfeeding-recommendations/#ixzz10BuLSOy4

Cloth Diapering, Selective Vaccinating, Breastfeeding Advocate who Formula Fed, Work at Home Mom, Professional Blogger, Social Media Director, Childbirth Educator, Doula, Mother to Camden, and Benjamin.
Expecting Baby #3 in May of 2011!

by on Sep. 21, 2010 at 11:43 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Megara
by on Sep. 21, 2010 at 11:53 AM

I think lack of education is one of the biggest reasons mothers don't breastfeed in this country.  I had one woman at my church tell me she tried to breastfeed, but she didn't have enough milk.  I asked her how long she tried - three days.  Three days!  If she had talked to a lactation consultant, or even another nursing mom, for 20 minutes, she would have learned that it can take up to a week to establish your milk supply!

norahsmommy
by Silver Member on Sep. 21, 2010 at 11:58 AM

I agree with this.  With all three of my kids a lactation consultant was supposed to come to my room after baby was born but none ever did.  With my second they gave her formula in the nursery while doing newborn screenings.  I only found out because she vomited and it was obvious what she had eaten.  I am so glad things went well especially with my first because I had no idea about breastfeeding really. I didnt do any research on it at all. I just thought, put baby to breast, feed when hungry. I bf for over a year with my first 2 and am working on 11 months with my third.  The longer I bf the more scrutiny I received from friends and family.  They were all so supportive at first, then once baby hit 6 months all I heard was "when are you going to wean?" 

norahsmommy
by Silver Member on Sep. 21, 2010 at 12:03 PM

Did a lactation consultant ever even visit her in the hospital? None did after my kids, they were supposed to but didn't. Also I had never known a woman who breastfed let alone talked to one.  I had an easy time, I was lucky. But many women have issues and no idea who to talk to.

Quoting Megara:

I think lack of education is one of the biggest reasons mothers don't breastfeed in this country.  I had one woman at my church tell me she tried to breastfeed, but she didn't have enough milk.  I asked her how long she tried - three days.  Three days!  If she had talked to a lactation consultant, or even another nursing mom, for 20 minutes, she would have learned that it can take up to a week to establish your milk supply!


Everyone who supported slavery was free.  Everyone who supports abortion was born.  That, my friends, is how oppression works.  -Anonymous

olivejuicebby
by on Sep. 21, 2010 at 12:19 PM

BUMP!

Megara
by on Sep. 21, 2010 at 12:23 PM

I have no idea if she ever saw an LC, but I guess no.  And that is part of the problem - there are a lot of women who don't know anyone who breastfeeds and have no idea who to talk to or how to find out what's normal.  I read an article somewhere about how this generation of mothers (us) have mothers who don't know anything about breastfeeding.  I'm very lucky - my mother was a "lactivist" when it was very unpopular!

Quoting norahsmommy:

Did a lactation consultant ever even visit her in the hospital? None did after my kids, they were supposed to but didn't. Also I had never known a woman who breastfed let alone talked to one.  I had an easy time, I was lucky. But many women have issues and no idea who to talk to.

Quoting Megara:

I think lack of education is one of the biggest reasons mothers don't breastfeed in this country.  I had one woman at my church tell me she tried to breastfeed, but she didn't have enough milk.  I asked her how long she tried - three days.  Three days!  If she had talked to a lactation consultant, or even another nursing mom, for 20 minutes, she would have learned that it can take up to a week to establish your milk supply!



Azure
by Bronze Member on Sep. 21, 2010 at 12:46 PM

Society carries a lot of weight on the decision too. Women are nervous/shy about feeding in public because they're afraid of being approached by someone who is offended by seeing a baby eating. I nursed my son until he was about 26 1/2 months, when he weaned himself, and I have gotten rude comments about it from people who think breastfeeding is abuse!!! after 6 months and others who don't believe a child should nurse after learning to walk. "Oh, sorry, hon, you're ten months old now and starting to walk, you obviously don't need the benefits of breastmilk anymore!" Please!

twobad4u84
by on Sep. 21, 2010 at 12:55 PM
This is my first time breast feeding. I didn't with my first and felt like I really missed out on something and I did. I felt like I didn't really "bond" with him. Don't get me wrong I love him more than anything but while breast feeding son #2 I feel "complete". It helps when there are other women to talk to and help when needed. With my first I didn't have support and that has been KEY this time.
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Megara
by on Sep. 21, 2010 at 12:55 PM

Congratulations!  I nursed my daughter until she self-weaned at 30 months, so I have heard every rude comment in the book!

Quoting Azure:

Society carries a lot of weight on the decision too. Women are nervous/shy about feeding in public because they're afraid of being approached by someone who is offended by seeing a baby eating. I nursed my son until he was about 26 1/2 months, when he weaned himself, and I have gotten rude comments about it from people who think breastfeeding is abuse!!! after 6 months and others who don't believe a child should nurse after learning to walk. "Oh, sorry, hon, you're ten months old now and starting to walk, you obviously don't need the benefits of breastmilk anymore!" Please!


MommaForever007
by on Sep. 21, 2010 at 1:03 PM

So question then for all you experts...I tried BF my first but when he was about 2 months old I noticed I didn't have enough milk for him.  Is there something I can do to prevent this with my second baby?  (due in March)  I would love to BF her but everybody I know bottle feeds...(or fed)

Megara
by on Sep. 21, 2010 at 1:06 PM

What gave you the impression you didn't have enough milk? 

Quoting MommaForever007:

So question then for all you experts...I tried BF my first but when he was about 2 months old I noticed I didn't have enough milk for him.  Is there something I can do to prevent this with my second baby?  (due in March)  I would love to BF her but everybody I know bottle feeds...(or fed)


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