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Right Occiput Transverse *info plz*

Posted by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 2:13 PM
  • 4 Replies

 I was on http://www.spinningbabies.com/ GREAT SITE by the way...and my lil man is sitting in ROT postition...do any of you have experience with this and what happens if they don't turn to LOT (left occiput transverse)....I was reading and reading...but didn't see anything... Please help me if you can.

PS...I really really really don't want a c-section..

by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 2:13 PM
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Replies (1-4):
rachelrothchild
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 2:15 PM

Mine was in that position at the appointment before my last appointment.  Why would you have to have a c-section?

O1j9a1n9n8a6t
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 2:17 PM

 Its just what some of the sites are saying...google just freaks you out lol...I figured I would ask women who had been there before.

Quoting rachelrothchild:

Mine was in that position at the appointment before my last appointment.  Why would you have to have a c-section?

 

NoraDun
by Platinum Member on Jun. 4, 2011 at 2:34 PM

Nothing...both positions are fine just left can make labor a little easier! Generally speaking the LOT babies turn the way needed to delivery easiest...while ROT don't always get into the easiest position possible.

Your baby is Right Occiput Anterior. 

The back is to your right, and the baby is facing towards the roomy sciatic notch in the back left of your pelvis.

This position is not clearly associated with a resulting labor pattern.  The baby may rotate to the posterior and, if so, labor may have a posterior pattern of cluster contractions with slow downs or stalls. The baby may rotate to the anterior and labor may be straight forward. The main thing is whether the chin is tucked.

 

ROA belly map with doll

 

 

Variables with the ROA baby that effect labor;

  1. Flexion of the chin
  2. First time mom
  3. Balance and tone of the soft tissues relating to birthing. (This means the uterus, ligaments, and fascia.)  

  4. Pelvic alignment (This effects the above mentioned balance and tone.)
  5. Pelvic shape and size
  6. Placental location

 

Use the 3 Principles to give the ROA baby a chance to turn and face the back, right side and have their back on mother's left.

  1. Relax the soft tissues so that the baby can move past the placenta during labor, if the placenta is anterior or on the left.
  2. Use maternal positioning to help the baby come up a centimeter and turn their head around to face the right.

 

Notice if there are small wiggling parts near the front, lower half of the womb. Hands in front indicate a posterior baby. The LOP baby is often labeled ROA because the forehead of the LOP baby feels the same width as the nape of the ROA baby's neck.

NoraDun
by Platinum Member on Jun. 4, 2011 at 2:37 PM

I recommend seeing a chiropracter. My Doula suggested it at the end of my last pregnancy. I wish I did it with all my babies...Needless to say he got everything aligned and the baby lined up so well that my daughter was delivered with less then two hrs of labor. I recommend it for everyone. Another lady I know had her first baby at home and she went to the chiropracter during her labor and she delivered in 2 hrs. FIRST baby!! Anyway if your really concerned find one that is familiar with working with pregnnat ladies. Good lcuk

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