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Pregnancy Pregnancy

My mother-in-law to be just said I'm high risk for ppd.

Posted by on Jul. 10, 2012 at 4:00 AM
  • 12 Replies

What is postpardum depression?

What makes someone high risk for ppd?

Is there any way to prevent ppd?

by on Jul. 10, 2012 at 4:00 AM
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Replies (1-10):
momof4and1man
by on Jul. 10, 2012 at 4:03 AM

It's what happens after you have the baby cuz all of those hormones you have come to know and get a custom to all of a sudden disappear...it leaves you very emotional...there are things u can do to help, but baby blues is normal ppd is what happens when u don't get a handle on it.

DoulaGinny
by on Jul. 10, 2012 at 7:31 AM

Women who have had previous bouts with major depression, PTSD, or are dealing with major stress in their lives right now can be at a higher risk.  There are other factors as well.  Great nutrition before birth and after helps!  But here is everything you need to know.  ;)  

Perinatal Mood & Anxiety Disorders Overview

·        Are you feeling sad or depressed?

·        Do you feel more irritable or angry with those around you?

·        Are you having difficulty bonding with your baby?

·        Do you feel anxious or panicky?

·        Are you having problems with eating or sleeping?

·        Are you having upsetting thoughts that you can't get out 
of your mind?

·        Do you feel as if you are "out of control" or "going crazy"?

·        Do you feel like you never should have become a mother?

·        Are you worried that you might hurt your baby or yourself?

Any of these symptoms, and many more, could indicate that you have a form of perinatal mood or anxiety disorder, such as postpartum depression. While many women experience some mild mood changes during or after the birth of a child, 15 to 20% of women experience more significant symptoms of depression or anxiety. Please know that with informed care you can prevent a worsening of these symptoms and can fully recover. There is no reason to continue to suffer.

Women of every culture, age, income level and race can develop perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. Symptoms can appear any time during pregnancy and the first 12 months after childbirth. There are effective and well-researched treatment options to help you recover. Although the term "postpartum depression" is most often used, there are actually several forms of illness that women may experience, including:

Pregnancy (also called antepartum) or Postpartum Depression. A woman with PPD might experience feelings of anger, sadness, irritability, guilt, lack of interest in the baby, changes in eating and sleeping habits, trouble concentrating, thoughts of hopelessness and sometimes even thoughts of harming the baby or herself. Depression during and after pregnancy occur more often than most people realize. Depression during pregnancy is also called antepartum or prenatal depression, and depression after pregnancy is called postpartum depression.

Approximately 15% of women experience significant depression following childbirth. The percentages are even higher for women who are also dealing with poverty, and can be twice as high for teen parents. Ten percent of women experience depression in pregnancy. In fact, perinatal depression is the most common complication of childbirth.

Symptoms can start anytime during pregnancy or the first year postpartum. They differ for everyone, and might include the following:

·        Feelings of anger or irritability

·        Lack of interest in the baby

·        Appetite and sleep disturbance

·        Crying and sadness

·        Feelings of guilt, shame or hopelessness

·        Loss of interest, joy or pleasure in things you used to enjoy

·        Possible thoughts of harming the baby or yourself

It is important to know the risk factors for antepartum and postpartum depression. Research shows that all of the things listed below put you at a higher risk for developing these illnesses. If you have any of these factors, you should discuss them with your medical provider so that you can plan ahead for care should you need it.

·        A personal or family history of depression, anxiety, or postpartum depression

·        Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD or PMS)

·        Inadequate support in caring for the baby

·        Financial stress

·        Marital stress

·        Complications in pregnancy, birth or breastfeeding

·        A major recent life event: loss, house move, job loss

·        Mothers of multiples

·        Mothers whose infants are in Neonatal Intensive Care (NICU)

·        Mothers who've gone through infertility treatments

·        Women with a thyroid imbalance

·        Women with any form of diabetes (type 1, type 2 or gestational)

Postpartum and antepartum depression are temporary and treatable with professional help. If you feel you may be suffering from one of these illnesses, know that it is not your fault and you are not to blame. 

Pregnancy (also called antepartum) or Postpartum Anxiety. A woman with PPA may experience extreme worries and fears, often over the health and safety of the baby. Some women have panic attacks and might feel shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness, a feeling of losing control, and numbness and tingling. Approximately 6% of pregnant women and 10% of postpartum women develop anxiety. Sometimes they experience anxiety alone, and sometimes they experience it in addition to depression.  

The symptoms of anxiety during pregnancy or postpartum might include:

· Constant worry 

· Feeling that something bad is going to happen 

· Racing thoughts 

· Disturbances of sleep and appetite 

· Inability to sit still 

• Physical symptoms like dizziness, hot flashes, and nausea

Risk factors for perinatal anxiety and panic include a personal or family history of anxiety, previous perinatal depression or anxiety, or thyroid imbalance. 

In addition to generalized anxiety, there are some specific forms of anxiety that you should know about. One is Postpartum Panic Disorder. This is a form of anxiety with which the sufferer feels very nervous and has recurring panic attacks. During a panic attack, she may experience shortness of breath, chest pain, claustrophobia, dizziness, heart palpitations, and numbness and tingling in the extremities. Panic attacks seem to go in waves, but it is important to know that they will pass and will not hurt you.

Another form of anxiety is Postpartum Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

Postpartum and antepartum anxiety are temporary and treatable with professional help. If you feel you may be suffering from one of these illnesses, know that it is not your fault and you are not to blame.

Pregnancy or Postpartum Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Women with PPOCD can have repetitive, upsetting and unwanted thoughts or mental images (obsessions), and sometimes they need to do certain things over and over (compulsions) to reduce the anxiety caused by those thoughts. These moms find these thoughts very scary and unusual and are very unlikely to ever act on them. Postpartum Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is the most misunderstood and misdiagnosed of the perinatal disorders. It is estimated that as many as 3-5% of new mothers will experience these symptoms. 

Symptoms of perinatal OCD can include:

·        Obsessions, also called intrusive thoughts, which are persistent, repetitive thoughts or mental images related to the baby. These thoughts are very upsetting and not something the woman has ever experienced before.

·        Compulsions, where the mom may do certain things over and over again to reduce her fears and obsessions. This may include things like needing to clean constantly, check things many times, count or reorder things.

·        A sense of horror about the obsessions

·        Fear of being left alone with the infant

·        Hypervigilance in protecting the infant  

Moms with postpartum OCD know that their thoughts are bizarre and are very unlikely to ever act on them.

Risk factors for postpartum OCD include a personal or family history of anxiety or OCD.

Postpartum OCD is temporary and treatable with professional help. If you feel you may be suffering from one of this illness, know that it is not your fault and you are not to blame. 

Postpartum Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. PPTSD is often caused by a traumatic or frightening childbirth, and symptoms may include flashbacks of the trauma with feelings of anxiety and the need to avoid things related to that event. Approximately 1-6% of women experience postpartum post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following childbirth. Most often, this illness is caused by a real or perceived trauma during delivery or postpartum. These traumas could include: 

·        Prolapsed cord

·        Unplanned C-section

·        Use of vacuum extractor or forceps to deliver the baby

·        Baby going to NICU

·        Feelings of powerlessness, poor communication and/or lack of support and reassurance during the delivery

Women who have experienced a previous trauma, such as rape or sexual abuse, are also at a higher risk for experiencing postpartum PTSD.

Symptoms of postpartum PTSD might include: 

·        Intrusive re-experiencing of a past traumatic event (which in this case may have been the childbirth itself)

·        Flashbacks or nightmares

·        Avoidance of stimuli associated with the event, including thoughts, feelings, people, places and details of the event

·        Persistent increased arousal (irritability, difficulty sleeping, hypervigilance, exaggerated startle response)

·        Anxiety and panic attacks

·        Feeling a sense of unreality and detachment

Postpartum PTSD is temporary and treatable with professional help. If you feel you may be suffering from this illness, know that it is not your fault and you are not to blame. 

Postpartum Psychosis. PPP sufferers sometimes see and hear voices or images that others can't, called hallucinations. They may believe things that aren't true and distrust those around them. They may also have periods of confusion and memory loss, and seem manic. This severe condition is dangerous so it is important to seek help immediately.  Postpartum Psychosis is a rare illness, compared to the rates of postpartum depression or anxiety. It occurs in approximately 1 to 2 out of every 1,000 deliveries, or approximately .1% of births. The onset is usually sudden, most often within the first 4 weeks postpartum.

Symptoms of postpartum psychosis can include:

·        Delusions or strange beliefs

·        Hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that aren't there)

·        Feeling very irritated

·        Hyperactivity

·        Decreased need for or inability to sleep

·        Paranoia and suspiciousness

·        Rapid mood swings

·        Difficulty communicating at times  

The most significant risk factors for postpartum psychosis are a personal or family history of bipolar disorder, or a previous psychotic episode.

Of the women who develop a postpartum psychosis, there is a 5% infanticide or suicide rate associated with the illness. This is because the woman experiencing psychosis is experiencing a break from reality. In her psychotic state, the delusions and beliefs make sense to her; they feel very meaningful and are often religious. Immediate treatment for these women is imperative.

It is also important to know that many survivors of postpartum psychosis never had delusions containing violent commands. Delusions take many forms, and not all of them are destructive. Most women who experience postpartum psychosis do not harm themselves or anyone else. However, there is always the risk of danger because psychosis includes delusional thinking and irrational judgment, and this is why women with this illness must be treated and carefully monitored by a trained healthcare professional.

Postpartum psychosis is temporary and treatable with professional help, but it is an emergency and it is essential that you receive immediate help. If you feel you or someone you know may be suffering from this illness, know that it is not your fault and you are not to blame. Call your doctor or an emergency crisis hotline right away so that you can get the help you need. 

What causes perinatal mood and anxiety disorders? Why did I get this?

There is no one cause for perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. Women who develop depression or anxiety around childbearing have symptoms that are caused by a combination of psychological, social, and biological stressors. Hormonal fluctuations cause reactions in sensitive women. Risk factors do include a personal or family history of mood or anxiety disorders such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder (manic-depressive), or schizophrenia, and sensitivity to hormonal changes. Developing a perinatal mood and anxiety disorder is not your fault. You did not do anything to "get" this.

What kind of treatment will help?

Treatment plans are different for each woman, but might include increased self-care, social support, talk therapy or counseling, and treatment of symptoms, with medication when necessary. Self-care includes proper rest, good nutrition, assistance with baby and other children, and caring for personal needs such as exercise, relaxation, or time with partner/spouse. Social support includes talking with others -- either on the telephone, online, or at a support group -- who understand and provide encouragement. Talking with a counselor or therapist who understands perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can be extremely beneficial. Finally, medications are available to address both anxiety and depression. Some women treat depression and anxiety with medication, some with natural remedies, some with diet and exercise, some with counseling, support groups, or spiritual practice and support. Many use all of them. Find what works best for you, make a plan of self-care, and stick to it. Learn about how to cope with depression and anxiety, and reach out to informed providers until you find the help you need.

How long will it take for me to get better?

Unlike chicken pox or measles, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders have no defined time frame. It is different for every woman and it depends on many things, including access to support and informed health care professionals. Every perinatal mood disorder, no matter how strong the symptoms are, is temporary and treatable. 

How do I find an informed health care professional to work with?

You can contact your local Postpartum Support International Coordinator to find informed health care professionals in your area or give you criteria to consider when seeking an informed health care professional. You can also start with your own doctor while you are looking.

What about medication?

Deciding if you need medication is a decision best made between you and your medical professional. Several medications are available to treat the symptoms of perinatal depression and anxiety. Some women take medication during pregnancy and while breastfeeding.

Can I take medications during pregnancy?

Work with an informed provider who prescribes medication to weigh the benefits and risks of the medications versus your symptoms of depression and anxiety.

If I take medication can I breastfeed?

Women do breastfeed and take medication. It is a decision best made between the mother and a provider who is informed on the latest research about using medication during pregnancy and breastfeeding. 

What about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)?

Exercise, massage, meditation or other techniques designed to relieve tension and stress can bring relief and be part of your wellness plan. Good nutrition and adequate rest will also be helpful. If you are using complementary and traditional medicines, you should make sure that all of your providers know about any medicines or remedies you are taking. You need to work with them to make sure that different treatments will work well together.

www.postpartum.net (All info in this handout)

~Ginny Mills

~Labor Doula & Childbirth Educator
Doula Ginny's Birth Svcs  www.DoulaGinnysBirthSvcs.com 
DoulaGinnyMills@gmail.com     731-499-7268     
Serving Jackson, TN & Surrounding West TN -Including Memphis

meam4444
by Emerald Member on Jul. 10, 2012 at 10:15 AM

bump

Rayawni
by on Jul. 10, 2012 at 10:22 AM
1 mom liked this
Mother in laws are annoying. I would ignore her.
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nickigoingon8
by on Jul. 10, 2012 at 10:25 AM

It is just a form of depression that normally happens after a woman has a baby..it can be mild to severe. It is from your hormones changing back to normal and if you are going to get it you get it...if you do get it call your ob and they can give you meds that you can take for a while until you feel better. There is no way your mother in law could know that now anyways so don't freak out about it : )

CafeMom Tickers
flowerfunleah
by Bronze Member on Jul. 10, 2012 at 12:24 PM

I heard you can eat your placenta to avoid the baby blues.

ashlee62982
by on Jul. 10, 2012 at 1:07 PM
I think anyone with previous depression issues is more likely to get PPD, and not just the baby blues. I have had some problems with it and since I have I ask my dr for a script of zoloft to start just in case I feel the depression coming on, or sometimes to start right away to head it off. I know I get ppd, the severity is dependant,
Perhaps she didn't say it to be a witch, but just so you are aware and can get help if you need it.
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jazzylady88
by on Jul. 10, 2012 at 1:27 PM

i wouldnt take any comments to heart, jus go with the flow and if thats the case take care of it with your dr when the time comes..theres really no way your mil can tell that before you give birth..all pregnant women are moody and emotional..it comes with the territory..good luck!

Mrs.Andrews
by Mandy on Jul. 10, 2012 at 1:28 PM

PPD is depression after the baby is born. It can be from the hormones and exhaustion. If you already struggle with depression, you can be higher risk. But it happens to a lot of people. All you can do is make sure you get as much sleep and rest as possible after baby is born, and try to keep your feelings and hormones in perspective. Also, talk to your doctor if you are struggling.

BiPolarMomto3
by on Jul. 10, 2012 at 1:30 PM
They can give you meds toward the end of your pregnancy to help prevent it I was medicated my whole pregnancy.

Quoting nickigoingon8:

It is just a form of depression that normally happens after a woman has a baby..it can be mild to severe. It is from your hormones changing back to normal and if you are going to get it you get it...if you do get it call your ob and they can give you meds that you can take for a while until you feel better. There is no way your mother in law could know that now anyways so don't freak out about it : )

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